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Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring
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Microfinance in the MENA region after the Arab Spring

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  • There are also tools that are meant to increase the access to finance. An example of program which facilitates the access to finance is the case of microfinance. Such programs are especially designed to serve poor clients. Over the last decade, the number of women reached by microfinance programs has considerably increased. Most of the financial organizations of this type consider women a profitable target, taking into consideration that small businesses usually associated with women also attract a higher interest rates.
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    • 1. Multi Country Workshop on Support for Euro-Mediterranean industrial cooperation on Access to Finance Organised by the European Commission (TAIEX) Milan, Italy 13 to 15 December 2011 Microfinance in MENA Challenges and Opportunities Ahead Guadalupe de la Mata
    • 2. <ul><li>Need for financial inclusion in MEDA </li></ul><ul><li>Microfinance in MEDA: Main features </li></ul><ul><li>Regional context update </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges and opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>The role of different actors to face the challenges and opportunities (Governments, MFIs, Donors) </li></ul>Topics for discussion
    • 3. Update on MENA Microfinance Sector
    • 4. Microfinance in the region before the Arab spring Source: Mix Market web site Market Share (2009 ) Region N of MFIs % of MFIs from total % outreach from total Countries with highest outreach in REgion Africa 150 15% 9% Kenya, South Africa, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Uganda ECA 189 19% 3% Mongolia, Bosnia, Azerbaijan, Kyrgyztan, Armenia Asia 289 27% 70% India, Blangladesh, Vietnam, Philippines, China LAC 347 34% 16% Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Bolivia, Brazil MENA 55 5% 3% Egypt, Morrocco, Jordan, Tunisia, IRaq
    • 5. Main features of the sector in the region
    • 6. Portfolio Quality and Profitability (2009)
    • 7. Impact of the political events since beginning of 2011
    • 8. Lessons learned
    • 9. Challenges
    • 10. Opportunities for further improvements: How can different stakeholders help?
    • 11. Opportunities for further improvements: How can different stakeholders help?
    • 12. Opportunities for further improvements: How can different stakeholders help?

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