Value of Unique IDs in Academia, Vilnius - Identifying knowledge contributors

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My slides from an invited talk at a conference on Unique IDs in Vilnius, Lithuania Feb 14th (http://uniqueids.org)

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Value of Unique IDs in Academia, Vilnius - Identifying knowledge contributors

  1. 1. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland - Identifying knowledge contributors - Applications of scholarly identifiers in research data publication Gudmundur A. Thorisson, PhD <gt50@leicester.ac.uk> Research associate, University of Leicester Guest scientist, University of Iceland Participant in the GEN2PHEN Consortium and the ORCID Technical Working Group -- Overview -- ๏ Research data in the life sciences - tackling a problem with sharing ๏ Incentives/rewards, attributing credit ๏ Identifying research outputs, use/reuse and contributors ๏ Emerging solutions & interesting developments ๏ The potentially vital role of ORCID as a central hub and aggregator This work is published under the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) which means that it can be freely copied, redistributed and adapted, as long as proper attribution is given. Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 1Tuesday, 14 February 12
  2. 2. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Big Science, Big Data • Scientific research increasingly large-scale and data-driven • High-profile examples – High-energy particle physics - experiments performed in the Large Hadron Collider – Astronomy - data from ground-based and space telescopes, the Virtual Observatory (VO) • Doctorow, C. Big data: Welcome to the petacentre. Nature 455, 16-21 (2008). http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/455016a Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 2Tuesday, 14 February 12
  3. 3. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Big Science, Big Data • Scientific research increasingly large-scale and data-driven • High-profile examples – High-energy particle physics - experiments performed in the Large Hadron Collider – Astronomy - data from ground-based and space telescopes, the Virtual Observatory (VO) • Doctorow, C. Big data: Welcome to the petacentre. Nature 455, 16-21 (2008). http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/455016a Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 2Tuesday, 14 February 12
  4. 4. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Large-scale data guides hypothesis generation • Science paradigms – 1st: Empirical - describing natural phenomena – 2nd: Theoretical - models, generalizations – 3rd: Computational - simulating complex phenomena4t – 4th (1+2+3): Data exploration, e-Science Gray, J. 2009. The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery. Microsoft Research Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 3Tuesday, 14 February 12
  5. 5. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Large-scale data guides hypothesis generation Kell and Oliver. Bioessays (2004) vol. 26 (1) • Science paradigms – 1st: Empirical - describing natural phenomena – 2nd: Theoretical - models, generalizations – 3rd: Computational - simulating complex phenomena4t – 4th (1+2+3): Data exploration, e-Science Gray, J. 2009. The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery. Microsoft Research Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 3Tuesday, 14 February 12
  6. 6. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Large-scale data guides hypothesis generation Kell and Oliver. Bioessays (2004) vol. 26 (1) • Science paradigms – 1st: Empirical - describing natural phenomena – 2nd: Theoretical - models, generalizations – 3rd: Computational - simulating complex phenomena4t – 4th (1+2+3): Data exploration, e-Science Gray, J. 2009. The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery. Microsoft Research Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 3Tuesday, 14 February 12
  7. 7. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Biological research also big and data-driven Richards, M. et al. Paleolithic and neolithic lineages in the European mitochondrial gene pool. American journal of human genetics 59, 185-203 (1996). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1915109/ Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 4Tuesday, 14 February 12
  8. 8. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Biological research also big and data-driven • Huge technological advances in last 5-10 years – experimental / observations <-- gathering data with high-throughput equipment – computer technology <-- storing & analyzing massive data volumes Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 5Tuesday, 14 February 12
  9. 9. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Biological research also big and data-driven • Huge technological advances in last 5-10 years – experimental / observations <-- gathering data with high-throughput equipment – computer technology <-- storing & analyzing massive data volumes • Example: massively-parallel sequencing – Determine human genome sequence in <1 day - the $1000 genome – Metagenomics: sequence *everything* in environment samples – Large bio-specimen collections • x100,0000 of individuals in disease/population biobanks Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 5Tuesday, 14 February 12
  10. 10. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Dealing with ‘Big Data’ • Managing & making sense of large-scale datasets – Data easy/cheap to generate - not so cheap to store & use – “the $1000 genome sequence, followed by the $10,000 analysis” • Integration & analysis - combine datasets – more data of the same type - e.g. combine sequences from multiple species – related data of different type - e.g. a person’s genome sequence + his/her phenotype • Potential for accelerating research, creating new knowledge and (in biomedicine) improving human health. • Founded on unrestricted sharing of scientific data deposited in the public domain Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 6Tuesday, 14 February 12
  11. 11. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Data = “fuel” of science [..] If digital technologies are the engine of this revolution, digital data are its fuel. But for many scientific disciplines, this fuel is in short supply.[..] Smith,V. Data publication: towards a database of everything. BMC Res Notes (2009) vol. 2 (1) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 7Tuesday, 14 February 12
  12. 12. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Domain repositories for sequence data Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 8Tuesday, 14 February 12
  13. 13. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Domain repositories for sequence data • GenBank - genetic sequence repository, established 1986 Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 8Tuesday, 14 February 12
  14. 14. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Domain repositories for sequence data • GenBank - genetic sequence repository, established 1986 • UniProt - knowledge base for protein sequence & function Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 8Tuesday, 14 February 12
  15. 15. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Domain repositories for structure data • Protein Data Bank - structure of proteins, nucleic acids and other bio-molecules Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 9Tuesday, 14 February 12
  16. 16. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Large-scale genome projects • The human genome sequence – International Human Genome project - mandatory rapid data sharing, the Bermuda principles • Pattern of variation in the human genome – International Haplotype Map Project - genotyping population samples – 1000 Genomes Project - sequencing population samples • Examples of community resource projects - large-scale data generation for the purpose of making the data available for broad reuse Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 10Tuesday, 14 February 12
  17. 17. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Data sharing in the “long tail” • Biology is complex, so data are often very heterogeneous • Technologies changing rapidly • Lots of small research projects • Lots of small/medium datasets The ‘long tail’ of dark bio-data • Data in the long tail usually *not* shared OR not shared in a useful way • Contrasts with other data-intensive disciplines with – a long history of sharing research data - a “culture of sharing” – big, expensive, shared facilities = the only way to do this kind of research – relatively homogeneous datasets, easier to scale up to big volumes (e.g. telescope images) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 11Tuesday, 14 February 12
  18. 18. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland The “data sharing problem’ in life sciences Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 12Tuesday, 14 February 12
  19. 19. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 13Tuesday, 14 February 12
  20. 20. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Data analysed synthesised interpreted Information published Knowledge Publication Lots of published knowledge but impossible to to go back reproduce work and validate findings Opportunity for maximising the value of data through reuse is wasted Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 13Tuesday, 14 February 12
  21. 21. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland LOTS of different reasons for not sharing - No suitable repository - - Too much work, no incentive for me - - The ‘My Data’ syndrome - ‘ownership’ vs ‘stewardship’ - My competitors can take the data and ‘scoop’ me - ‘Genuine’ reasons for not sharing freely, e.g.: -ethical: patient confidentiality / consent -IP: intellectual property Koslow. Should the neuroscience community make a paradigm shift to sharing primary data?. Nat Neurosci (2000) vol. 3 (9) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 14Tuesday, 14 February 12
  22. 22. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland LOTS of different reasons for not sharing - No suitable repository - - Too much work, no incentive for me - - The ‘My Data’ syndrome - ‘ownership’ vs ‘stewardship’ - My competitors can take the data and ‘scoop’ me - ‘Genuine’ reasons for not sharing freely, e.g.: -ethical: patient confidentiality / consent -IP: intellectual property Most reasons can be dismissed by referring to Koslow. Should the neuroscience community make basic premise of scientific discourse a paradigm shift to sharing primary data?. Nat Neurosci (2000) vol. 3 (9) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 14Tuesday, 14 February 12
  23. 23. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Sharing currently driven by mandates Journals increasingly require data to be available “Provide supporting data in a repository OR we won’t publish your paper” Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 16 15Tuesday, 14 February 12
  24. 24. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Sharing currently driven by mandates Journals increasingly require data to be available “Provide supporting data in a repository OR we won’t publish your paper” Funders increasingly require data sharing plan & budget baked into grant proposals. “Publish data we are funding you to generate OR we will not fund your research again” Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 16 15Tuesday, 14 February 12
  25. 25. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Sharing currently driven by mandates Journals increasingly require data to be available “Provide supporting data in a repository OR we won’t publish your paper” Funders increasingly require data sharing plan & budget baked into grant proposals. “Publish data we are funding you to generate OR we will not fund your research again” Using just a stick gets you so far Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 16 15Tuesday, 14 February 12
  26. 26. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Sharing currently driven by mandates Journals increasingly require data to be available “Provide supporting data in a repository OR we won’t publish your paper” Funders increasingly require data sharing plan & budget baked into grant proposals. “Publish data we are funding you to generate OR we will not fund your research again” Mandates likely to ensure only Using just a stick minimum compliance gets you so far - AND - often are not enforced Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 16 15Tuesday, 14 February 12
  27. 27. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 16Tuesday, 14 February 12
  28. 28. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Complimentary strategies to encourage sharing - Make it easy - - Make it useful - - Make it citable - Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 17Tuesday, 14 February 12
  29. 29. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Prof Anthony J Brookes GEN2PHEN coordinator Chair, Bioinformatics and Genomics Department of Genetics University of Leicester, UK Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 18 4Tuesday, 14 February 12
  30. 30. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Researcher IDs in GEN2PHEN • The aim is to – create the mechanisms for researchers to get credit for their contributions to scientific knowledge, even if contributions don’t fit into * the human-readable ‘aliquots’ of a conventional journal article * some vague notion of attributing credit by way of position in authorlist – ..and thereby provide incentives for the kind of thankless work that people now do without any kind of reward. • Main use cases being explored – Research datasets in disease genetics – Database management and curation Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 19Tuesday, 14 February 12
  31. 31. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Key building blocks: the 3 I’s Identifying the scholarly work or research output – e.g. Bell et al. 2009. Science 323(5919) doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0024357 Identifying use/reuse - measuring impact – e.g number of full-text downloads for article X first 6 months after publication Identifying contributors - attributing credit – e.g. who contributed to highly-cited resource X? Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 20Tuesday, 14 February 12
  32. 32. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • The problem: unstable URL references to online digital materials – http://www.le.ac.uk/~gt50/files/important_data/env2012.dat – URL decay, tend to have short half-life • URLs are locators for online resources - need persistent identifiers Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 21Tuesday, 14 February 12
  33. 33. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Articles published in scientific journals – Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) issued to papers via CrossRef – Identifier resolves to metadata record, link to current location of content • Example: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt1109-984b => ‘landing page’ on journal website – Content moves => DOI metadata is updated => stable identifier points to new location Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 22Tuesday, 14 February 12
  34. 34. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Articles published in scientific journals – Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) issued to papers via CrossRef – Identifier resolves to metadata record, link to current location of content • Example: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt1109-984b => ‘landing page’ on journal website – Content moves => DOI metadata is updated => stable identifier points to new location Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 22Tuesday, 14 February 12
  35. 35. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Biological datasets published in digital repositories – Institutional vs. domain-specific, often offer Handles or other persistent ID scheme – DataCite Consortium created in 2009 – to promote the use of ‘data DOIs’ – Data Dryad, FigShare, others Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 23Tuesday, 14 February 12
  36. 36. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Biological datasets published in digital repositories – Institutional vs. domain-specific, often offer Handles or other persistent ID scheme – DataCite Consortium created in 2009 – to promote the use of ‘data DOIs’ – Data Dryad, FigShare, others Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 23Tuesday, 14 February 12
  37. 37. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Biological databases, added-value from expert curation – No identification scheme - acknowledgement based conventional papers, URLs, names – e.g. http://www.uniprot.org, GenBank, Database of COL3A1 gene mutations – The new BioDBCore initiative is building the foundations for a registry of bio-databases – Could become a kind of ‘journal’ for database resources – Example persistent resource URI: http://identifiers.org/biodbcore/COL Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 24Tuesday, 14 February 12
  38. 38. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying resources - persistent, unique IDs • Biological databases, added-value from expert curation – No identification scheme - acknowledgement based conventional papers, URLs, names – e.g. http://www.uniprot.org, GenBank, Database of COL3A1 gene mutations – The new BioDBCore initiative is building the foundations for a registry of bio-databases – Could become a kind of ‘journal’ for database resources – Example persistent resource URI: http://identifiers.org/biodbcore/COL Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 24Tuesday, 14 February 12
  39. 39. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying reuse - beyond the Impact Factor • Reliance on citations and citation-based metrics – ISI Impact Factor really a way to measure influence of scholarly journals – Not going away: citation remains the gold standard • Lots of other use/reuse indicators for impact of scholarly articles – Focus on the impact of the *publication* itself, not the journal in which it appears – Indicators: no. full-text downloads, tweets (i.e. mentions on Twitter), social bookmarking – AltMetrics - a growing grassroots movement “ to better measure and reward all the different ways that people contribute to the messy and complex process of scientific progress [..] born out of a simple recognition: Many of the traditional measurements are too slow or simplistic to keep pace with today’s Internet-age science” – Lots new tools emerging to explore possibilities in this space Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 25Tuesday, 14 February 12
  40. 40. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 26Tuesday, 14 February 12
  41. 41. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 26Tuesday, 14 February 12
  42. 42. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 27Tuesday, 14 February 12
  43. 43. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying reuse - beyond the Impact Factor • Reliance on citations and citation-based metrics – ISI Impact Factor really a way to measure influence of scholarly journals – Not going away: citation remains the gold standard • Lots of other use/reuse indicators for impact of scholarly articles – Focus on the impact of the *publication* itself, not the journal in which it appears – Indicators: no. full-text downloads, tweets (i.e. mentions on Twitter), social bookmarking – AltMetrics - a growing grassroots movement “ to better measure and reward all the different ways that people contribute to the messy and complex process of scientific progress [..] born out of a simple recognition: Many of the traditional measurements are too slow or simplistic to keep pace with today’s Internet-age science” – Lots new tools emerging to explore possibilities in this space • Key obstacle: access to citation links, downloads, ‘clickstream’ data Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 28Tuesday, 14 February 12
  44. 44. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying contributors - the common thread [Or: what’s ORCID go to do with all this??] • Vast majority of repositories and database currently rely on names for identifying creators/curators/persons in general => leads to disambiguation problems Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 29Tuesday, 14 February 12
  45. 45. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying contributors - the common thread Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 30Tuesday, 14 February 12
  46. 46. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Identifying contributors - the common thread – For content, many different identifier schemes will be needed, because there’s a range of different types of scholarly content – For contributors, a single, unified identifier scheme is needed, because a person will tend to contribute to various types of content over his/her career • What kind of contribution? – Conventional authorship – Analytical, data managing, technical vs. intellectual / scientific, support roles etc. – Editing / peer-review, incl. future post-publication review systems • Complications relating to attributing credit – like High-ener paper, >1000 authors. they’re not really all *authors* are they? • Intellectual input vs. pure support? • designed experiment, ran key analysis, technical support staff etc. Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 31Tuesday, 14 February 12
  47. 47. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland • But, wait! there’s many more ways of contributing to science than publishing papers/data and curating databases! 21st century ‘Digital scholars’ should also be credited for contributions to... Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 32Tuesday, 14 February 12
  48. 48. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland ... Wikipedia articles Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 33Tuesday, 14 February 12
  49. 49. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland ... open-source software projects Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 34Tuesday, 14 February 12
  50. 50. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland ... distributed analytical workflows + other digital research objects (published e.g. on myExperiment.org) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 35Tuesday, 14 February 12
  51. 51. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland • .. and many more! – future post-publication open peer-review systems – stuff we haven’t even thought of • ORCID can potentially have a pivotal role here – as source of scholarly identities – as central aggregator & index of data on links between author & content Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 36Tuesday, 14 February 12
  52. 52. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Lessons from social networking domain • We NOW HAVE: – Lots of 3rd party applications built around social IDs that users already have on Twitter, Facebook and other sites • We WILL HAVE in the near future: – online scholarly communication tools built around ORCID IDs that scholars already have – Rich ecosystem of ‘ORCID apps’ – Lower the barrier to participation - tackle the “multiple profiles syndrome” • The 1st-generation ORCID central service will support this Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 37Tuesday, 14 February 12
  53. 53. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Technologically, this is not rocket science Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 38Tuesday, 14 February 12
  54. 54. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Technologically, this is not rocket science Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 38Tuesday, 14 February 12
  55. 55. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Single sign-on with social IDs Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 39Tuesday, 14 February 12
  56. 56. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Some points for discussion • Is ORCID the right way forward? • International organization with many stakeholders – Big mass, moves slowly, complex politics, BUT this also gives it ‘oomph’ • The upcoming contributor ID service will be centralized – Single place to point to when promoting in community – Developer-friendly: integration app with a single service • The organization & registry is open (enough) – Enable reuse & collaboration with others, BUT slices of data will be for members only • Engaging with end users - scholars to manage their profile • Journal publishers are involved and committed – Will be key to adoption via journal article submission, BUT what about anti-OA and other questionable practices? Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 40Tuesday, 14 February 12
  57. 57. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 41Tuesday, 14 February 12
  58. 58. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 41Tuesday, 14 February 12
  59. 59. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 41Tuesday, 14 February 12
  60. 60. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 41Tuesday, 14 February 12
  61. 61. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland An online identity as a digital scholar, anchored in a ORCID profile? Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 29 42Tuesday, 14 February 12
  62. 62. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland An online identity as a digital scholar, anchored in a ORCID profile? ORCID ID: B-1242-2010 G. Thorisson, Univ. Leicester G. A. Thorisson, Univ. Leicester G. A. Thorisson, Cold Spring Harbor Lab. Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 29 42Tuesday, 14 February 12
  63. 63. G. A. Thorisson, University of Leicester / University of Iceland Acknowledgements GEN2PHEN Consortium This work has received funding from the http://www.gen2phen.org/about-gen2phen/partners European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement number 200754 - Prof Anthony J. Brookes Bioinformatics Group, Leicester the GEN2PHEN project. Contact me! <gt50@le.ac.uk> |<gthorisson@gmail.com> http://www.linkedin.com/in/mummi http://www.twitter.com/gthorisson Published under the CC BY license (http:// http://www.gthorisson.name creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) Conference on Unique Identifiers, Vilnius, Feb 14 2012 43Tuesday, 14 February 12

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