GTC Scotland Conference 2009 Workshop: Understanding teachers as learning professionals: research perspectives AERS Learne...
Outline <ul><li>Conceptual Framework (Triple lens) </li></ul><ul><li>Research questions and methodology </li></ul><ul><li>...
Summary of Triple Lens Framework Sphere of action  in which the learning takes place Dimensions : Formal/informal Planned/...
Lens 3 –  Sphere  of action (Fraser  et al ., 2007) PLANNED INCIDENTAL INFORMAL FORMAL Chartered teacher module classes Ed...
Teachers as Learners  Research questions <ul><li>How is teachers’ professional learning understood in Scotland? </li></ul>...
Survey Methodology <ul><li>Online questionnaire (‘Snap’ software) currently underway  </li></ul><ul><li>Three sections </l...
Some ‘taster’ findings <ul><li>N=1200 </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative data: frequencies of response to closed items </li></...
Teacher Survey:  quantitative data  Responses from four local authorities (N=1144 teachers) Analysis by Eleni Karagiannido...
Sample 3.5 40 Other 3.8 44 Special 59.9 571 Secondary 42.7 489 Pre-school/Primary  Percentage of sample No. of responses T...
Sample characteristics <ul><li>N=1144 </li></ul><ul><li>Promoted – 29% </li></ul><ul><li>Unpromoted – 71% </li></ul><ul><l...
Engagement in different forms of CPD
Engagement in different forms of CPD 0 1 1 19 80 Individual activity 0 1 1 16 82 Informal discussion/ support 10 69 4 7 10...
Different forms of CPD: How beneficial?  Percentage frequency (N=1144) 13 3 13 42 29 School/cluster working party or devel...
Different forms of CPD: How beneficial? Percentage frequency (N=1144) 76 3 2 6 13 Mentoring  (as mentee) 65 2 3 15 15 Ment...
Different forms of CPD: How beneficial? Percentage frequency (N=1144) 4 0 2 31 63 Individual activity 4 0 1 19 77 Support ...
Views about professional learning <ul><li>Experimenting with new learning and teaching strategies can help me develop my p...
Views about professional learning <ul><li>If I have a problem with my teaching I usually turn to colleagues for help </li>...
Teacher Survey:  qualitative data  Responses from two local authorities (N=198 teachers) Interim analysis by Lesley Reid &...
Open-ended Survey Questions <ul><li>Give examples of ways in which you have benefited from these activities </li></ul><ul>...
Teachers’ needs as Learners <ul><li>.. too many courses which  are powerpoint and not enough discussion or practical examp...
Teachers’ needs as Learners (contd.) <ul><li>Personal reading is particularly helpful  </li></ul><ul><li>Being part of Aif...
Teacher learning – pupil gains? <ul><li>It encourages you to try .. And to go and find new ideas , then assess their effec...
TRIPLE LENS FRAMEWORK  1. Domains of Influence personal/social/occupational <ul><li>“ From my own reading and research I h...
2. Sphere of Action <ul><li>Collocation  </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>S...
3. Capacity for professional autonomy <ul><li>Contextualised learning </li></ul><ul><li>Broad professional landscape </li>...
Triple Lens Framework <ul><li>Bell and Gilbert </li></ul><ul><li>Reid’s Quadrants </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy’s Continuum </...
Feeling valued and supported <ul><li>Many respondents refer to increased confidence…  </li></ul><ul><li>Feeling supported ...
Some interim conclusions from survey <ul><li>Teachers do not construe their professional learning only in terms of deliver...
Task: sort examples on sheet into the four quadrants of teacher learning formal informal planned incidental 1 2 3 4
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'Understanding teachers as learning professionals: research perspective.' (National Education Conference, 28 May 2009)

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'Understanding teachers as learning professionals: research perspective.'
University of Strathclyde, Workshop 6, GTC Scotland National Education Conference, 28 May 2009.

This workshop will showcase research findings about teachers as learners in the context of their continuing professional development (CPD) from projects conducted by AERS Learners, Learning and Teaching Network and related studies.

It will highlight: the importance of taking into account the different personal, social and occupational influences on teachers' learning; the extent to which teachers feel they have ownership of their CPD and the extent to which CPD transforms practice; the potential importance of both formal and informal settings and both planned and unplanned opportunities for professional learning, especially in collaborative contexts.

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  • 'Understanding teachers as learning professionals: research perspective.' (National Education Conference, 28 May 2009)

    1. 1. GTC Scotland Conference 2009 Workshop: Understanding teachers as learning professionals: research perspectives AERS Learners, Learning and Teaching Network Project 2 Team University of Strathclyde, University of Aberdeen, University of Glasgow and University of Edinburgh.
    2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Conceptual Framework (Triple lens) </li></ul><ul><li>Research questions and methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Snapshots from survey </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers’ experiences of CPD and professional learning opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers’ views and attitudes to CPD and professional learning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Qualitative data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers’ needs as Learners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher learning- pupil gains? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Triple lens framework themes emerging </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conclusions? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Summary of Triple Lens Framework Sphere of action in which the learning takes place Dimensions : Formal/informal Planned/incidental 3. Quadrants of teacher learning Capacity for professional autonomy and transformative practice supported by the learning Continuum : Transmission/ transitional/ transformation 2. Analytical framework for CPD Domain of influence of professional learning Domains : Personal/ social/ occupational 1. Aspects of professional learning What is being categorised? Terms of categorisation Framework (Lens)
    4. 4. Lens 3 – Sphere of action (Fraser et al ., 2007) PLANNED INCIDENTAL INFORMAL FORMAL Chartered teacher module classes Education Authority courses In-school courses School development meetings Action Research Projects Joint forward planning Web-based networks Sharing professional experiences at assessment moderation meetings Incidental conversations at teacher network meetings Staffroom ‘chat’ ‘ Corridor culture’ Photocopier conversations
    5. 5. Teachers as Learners Research questions <ul><li>How is teachers’ professional learning understood in Scotland? </li></ul><ul><li>How is professional learning for teachers realised in Scotland? </li></ul><ul><li>How do teachers currently advance/address their own professional development/learning? </li></ul><ul><li>To what extent are schools ‘professional learning communities’? </li></ul><ul><li>To what extent are teachers’ professional needs and aspirations currently realised? </li></ul>
    6. 6. Survey Methodology <ul><li>Online questionnaire (‘Snap’ software) currently underway </li></ul><ul><li>Three sections </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. background details: sector, promoted, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. professional learning undertaken in last 12 months: types, how beneficial?, any barriers? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. attitudes/views on professional learning: school as learning community; collaborative approaches; teacher professionalism (inc. statements derived from interviews) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Distributed electronically through four Scottish local authorities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 urban; 1 mixed; and 2 rural (1 small, 1 large) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Target population of serving teachers c. 10,000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Entry into prize draw incentive for participating </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Some ‘taster’ findings <ul><li>N=1200 </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative data: frequencies of response to closed items </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative data: comments from text boxes </li></ul>
    8. 8. Teacher Survey: quantitative data Responses from four local authorities (N=1144 teachers) Analysis by Eleni Karagiannidou and Donald Christie
    9. 9. Sample 3.5 40 Other 3.8 44 Special 59.9 571 Secondary 42.7 489 Pre-school/Primary Percentage of sample No. of responses Type of school
    10. 10. Sample characteristics <ul><li>N=1144 </li></ul><ul><li>Promoted – 29% </li></ul><ul><li>Unpromoted – 71% </li></ul><ul><li>Female – 77% </li></ul><ul><li>Male – 23% </li></ul><ul><li>Award bearing course since qualifying? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Yes: 567(49.6%); No: 575(50.3%); D.n.a.: 2(0.2%) </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Engagement in different forms of CPD
    12. 12. Engagement in different forms of CPD 0 1 1 19 80 Individual activity 0 1 1 16 82 Informal discussion/ support 10 69 4 7 10 Mentoring as mentee 7 59 5 14 16 Mentoring as mentor 3 22 13 42 21 Peer observation 1 9 7 40 43 Team teaching/collaboration N/A Never One-off Occasional Frequent Type of CPD (%)
    13. 13. Different forms of CPD: How beneficial? Percentage frequency (N=1144) 13 3 13 42 29 School/cluster working party or development gp. 1 2 18 51 27 School-based event or in-service session 8 1 11 44 36 External event e.g. conference, l.a. in-service Not/ applicable Not at all beneficial Of limited benefit Beneficial Highly beneficial Type of CPD
    14. 14. Different forms of CPD: How beneficial? Percentage frequency (N=1144) 76 3 2 6 13 Mentoring (as mentee) 65 2 3 15 15 Mentoring (as mentor) 26 1 7 30 36 Peer observation Not/ applicable Not at all beneficial Of limited benefit Beneficial Highly beneficial Type of CPD
    15. 15. Different forms of CPD: How beneficial? Percentage frequency (N=1144) 4 0 2 31 63 Individual activity 4 0 1 19 77 Support from/ informal discussion with colleagues 12 0 5 32 51 Team teaching/collabor-ative working Not/ applicable Not at all beneficial Of limited benefit Beneficial Highly beneficial Type of CPD
    16. 16. Views about professional learning <ul><li>Experimenting with new learning and teaching strategies can help me develop my practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 96% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Professional learning is not just about knowing what to do, but also why I'm doing it </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 93% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Professional learning is mostly about learning in the workplace during collaboration with colleagues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 58% </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Views about professional learning <ul><li>If I have a problem with my teaching I usually turn to colleagues for help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 89% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>I feel that it is the individual's responsibility to undertake professional learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 79% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The responsibility for my professional learning should lie with the management of my school </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 13% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>I feel I need more time to spend on professional learning activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly agree/agree: 73% </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Teacher Survey: qualitative data Responses from two local authorities (N=198 teachers) Interim analysis by Lesley Reid & Chris Fraser
    19. 19. Open-ended Survey Questions <ul><li>Give examples of ways in which you have benefited from these activities </li></ul><ul><li>Give examples of ways in which any of these activities were not effective </li></ul><ul><li>Is there anything else that you would like to tell us about your professional learning? </li></ul>
    20. 20. Teachers’ needs as Learners <ul><li>.. too many courses which are powerpoint and not enough discussion or practical examples… </li></ul><ul><li>The problem is that they are never practical, only lectures which hardly practises what they are preaching about active learning! </li></ul><ul><li>When would you ever talk to a class for over an hour and expect them to listen and learn? NEVER! Why can these days not be more interactive and involve more activity based exercises? </li></ul><ul><li>How many boring CPDs, HGIOS rubbish can any one person sit through?….and this Curriculum for Excellence mince…! </li></ul>
    21. 21. Teachers’ needs as Learners (contd.) <ul><li>Personal reading is particularly helpful </li></ul><ul><li>Being part of AifLworking group enabled interaction with latest research and stimulated practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback from colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Co-operatiive learning course </li></ul><ul><li>Peer collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Moderation </li></ul><ul><li>External courses </li></ul><ul><li>Chartered teacher programme </li></ul><ul><li>Network meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion with colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Mentor support </li></ul>
    22. 22. Teacher learning – pupil gains? <ul><li>It encourages you to try .. And to go and find new ideas , then assess their effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the training I have been on, I have put into action straightaway </li></ul><ul><li>Discussing behaviour strategies with colleagues to understand better how to deal with pupils </li></ul><ul><li>Invaluable for sharing good ideas, reassuring each other about our teaching, evolving new activities for use within the department </li></ul><ul><li>Has made me change my practice to the benefit of pupils </li></ul>
    23. 23. TRIPLE LENS FRAMEWORK 1. Domains of Influence personal/social/occupational <ul><li>“ From my own reading and research I have been able to find new ideas for working with children in my class which are sometimes more successful than things I have done n the past. Informal discussions with peers always produce constructive ideas for dealing with problem children or introducing interesting materials .” </li></ul>
    24. 24. 2. Sphere of Action <ul><li>Collocation </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Serendipity </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion reminds me of methods that I had forgotten or or encourages me to try new things. </li></ul>
    25. 25. 3. Capacity for professional autonomy <ul><li>Contextualised learning </li></ul><ul><li>Broad professional landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Acquisition of knowledge, skill stressed rather than understanding </li></ul>
    26. 26. Triple Lens Framework <ul><li>Bell and Gilbert </li></ul><ul><li>Reid’s Quadrants </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy’s Continuum </li></ul>
    27. 27. Feeling valued and supported <ul><li>Many respondents refer to increased confidence… </li></ul><ul><li>Feeling supported and being able to support each other ‘ especially when SMT are negligent with praise’ </li></ul><ul><li>Being a valued member of the school/belonging. </li></ul><ul><li>A sense of ownership, a feeling of not being alone and having a safe place to discuss problems also seemed important. </li></ul><ul><li>Do these indicate feeling in control in a system that is largely controlled by others? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Some interim conclusions from survey <ul><li>Teachers do not construe their professional learning only in terms of delivered courses </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers particularly value the informal support from, and professional dialogue with, colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers value collaborative working in small groups located in their own school context (but this was more strongly evidenced in individual comments than in quantitative data) </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers see professional learning as their own (and not management’s) responsibility, but they feel that more time should be allowed for their professional learning </li></ul><ul><li>Occasionally CPD can serve as a source of inspiration and motivation, e.g. ‘Rekindled some enthusiasm for job which has flickered recently.... </li></ul>
    29. 29. Task: sort examples on sheet into the four quadrants of teacher learning formal informal planned incidental 1 2 3 4

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