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  • Main idea: Mobile money holds a lot of promise for expanding access to finance in places where mobile phones are everywhere (and cheap), but banks are few and far between (and costly, in time, money, and other barriers). So far, M-PESA has been wildly successful, but m-money users are basically just using transfer services. Even though “mobile money” has taken off, very few people got information about personal finance via SMS. Urban users, who are more likely to already have better access to finance, are more likely to do things like save money via “branchless banking” or pay bills – for example, when I was in Nairobi people were talking about how businessmen that don’t want to carry large sums of money around, for fear of being robbed, now prefer to pay for things via mobile payments… they know that even if their phone gets stolen, their password-protected account is still safe. This is a good reality check, but again it’s an area that’s changing rapidly and these results will probably look much different in one or two years.Transition: So for one of the hot topics in personal finance, the data allow us to see what people are really doing, as well as some of the reasons they’re not currently using these services. The data also lets you identify who’s being left out, and where to focus more attention.
  • Main idea: Mobile money holds a lot of promise for expanding access to finance in places where mobile phones are everywhere (and cheap), but banks are few and far between (and costly, in time, money, and other barriers). So far, M-PESA has been wildly successful, but m-money users are basically just using transfer services. Even though “mobile money” has taken off, very few people got information about personal finance via SMS. Urban users, who are more likely to already have better access to finance, are more likely to do things like save money via “branchless banking” or pay bills – for example, when I was in Nairobi people were talking about how businessmen that don’t want to carry large sums of money around, for fear of being robbed, now prefer to pay for things via mobile payments… they know that even if their phone gets stolen, their password-protected account is still safe. This is a good reality check, but again it’s an area that’s changing rapidly and these results will probably look much different in one or two years.Transition: So for one of the hot topics in personal finance, the data allow us to see what people are really doing, as well as some of the reasons they’re not currently using these services. The data also lets you identify who’s being left out, and where to focus more attention.
  • Main Idea: With mobile phones, for example, many people still use other people’s phones – borrowing, paying at a kiosk, etc.This is a good example of the kind of information you can’t get from simple subscription rates – to see something like whether people will buy a SIM card and have a phone number, even if they don’t have their own handset. We found that people who own a phone personally are much more likely to use features like SMS, mobile money, etc., so it’s important to look at the type of access different groups have (women, a particular region, etc) when gauging whether mobile phones are a good way to reach your target audience.Transition: So this understanding of the media and communication environment is a critical first step, but the really innovative value of this kind of data is to be able to identify a target audience and/or a target sector, and get detailed information that helps you design a better communication strategy…
  • Main idea: Mobile money holds a lot of promise for expanding access to finance in places where mobile phones are everywhere (and cheap), but banks are few and far between (and costly, in time, money, and other barriers). So far, M-PESA has been wildly successful, but m-money users are basically just using transfer services. Even though “mobile money” has taken off, very few people got information about personal finance via SMS. Urban users, who are more likely to already have better access to finance, are more likely to do things like save money via “branchless banking” or pay bills – for example, when I was in Nairobi people were talking about how businessmen that don’t want to carry large sums of money around, for fear of being robbed, now prefer to pay for things via mobile payments… they know that even if their phone gets stolen, their password-protected account is still safe. This is a good reality check, but again it’s an area that’s changing rapidly and these results will probably look much different in one or two years.Transition: So for one of the hot topics in personal finance, the data allow us to see what people are really doing, as well as some of the reasons they’re not currently using these services. The data also lets you identify who’s being left out, and where to focus more attention.
  • Main idea: Mobile money holds a lot of promise for expanding access to finance in places where mobile phones are everywhere (and cheap), but banks are few and far between (and costly, in time, money, and other barriers). So far, M-PESA has been wildly successful, but m-money users are basically just using transfer services. Even though “mobile money” has taken off, very few people got information about personal finance via SMS. Urban users, who are more likely to already have better access to finance, are more likely to do things like save money via “branchless banking” or pay bills – for example, when I was in Nairobi people were talking about how businessmen that don’t want to carry large sums of money around, for fear of being robbed, now prefer to pay for things via mobile payments… they know that even if their phone gets stolen, their password-protected account is still safe. This is a good reality check, but again it’s an area that’s changing rapidly and these results will probably look much different in one or two years.Transition: So for one of the hot topics in personal finance, the data allow us to see what people are really doing, as well as some of the reasons they’re not currently using these services. The data also lets you identify who’s being left out, and where to focus more attention.
  • HERE THE DEMOGRAPHIC FOCUS IS ON EARLY ADOPTERS – FOR EXAMPLE IN MOBILE PHONES, THOSE WHO ACQUIRED ONE MORE THAN 5 YEARS AGO. INTERESTING HOW THE GENDER MIX CHANGES AS THE PURCHASE DATA COMES CLOSER, BY THE WAY, THOUGH THE GAP REMAINS LARGER IN KENYA. WHY INTERESTED IN THESE PEOPLE? COULD BE A PROXY FOR TECHNICAL CHAMPIONS – THOSE WHO BLAZE TRAILS WITH NEW ICTs. IN PROJECT DESIGN, IT PAYS TO BE AWARE OF SUCH PEOPLE AND HOW THEY ACT DIFFERENTLY FROM “THE REST” SO LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT THAT.
  • Transcript

    • 1. MMU<br />Working Group<br />May 24, 2010<br />Hotel Intercontinental <br />Rio de Janeiro, Brazil<br />Peter Goldstein<br />InterMedia<br />goldsteinp@intermedia.org<br />Tel. 1-202-341-0042<br />
    • 2. The AudienceScapes Project<br />InterMedia’s Worldwide Research Experience<br />EUROPE/CIS COUNTRIES:<br />Albania<br />Armenia<br />Azerbaijan<br />Belarus<br />Bosnia<br />Chechnya<br />Georgia<br />Kazakhstan<br />Kosovo<br />Kyrgyzstan<br />Macedonia<br />Moldova<br />Russia<br />Tajikistan<br />Ukraine<br />Uzbekistan<br />ASIA: <br />Bangladesh<br />Cambodia<br />China<br />India<br />Indonesia<br />Laos<br />Nepal<br />Pakistan<br />Sri Lanka <br />SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: <br />Angola Nigeria<br />Burkina Faso Rwanda<br />Burundi Somalia <br />Chad Sudan<br />DR Congo Tanzania<br />Ethiopia Zambia<br />Ghana Zimbabwe<br />Guinea <br />Kenya<br />Mali <br />Mozambique <br />L. AMERICA/CARRIBEAN: <br />Argentina Mexico<br />Bolivia Nicaragua<br />Brazil Paraguay<br />Colombia Venezuela<br />Cuba<br />Ecuador<br />Guatemala<br />Jamaica<br /> Haiti<br />MIDDLE EAST/N. AFRICA: <br />Afghanistan<br />Gulf Countries<br />Egypt <br />Iran<br />Iraq<br />Jordan<br />Lebanon<br />Morocco<br />Tunisia<br />Turkey<br />
    • 3. The AudienceScapes Project<br />What Research Can Do For You:Learn about new technology “Early Adopters”<br />We ask: How long ago did you buy your first mobile phone? Early Adopters answer “more than 5 years ago.”<br />We want to know: Do early adopters use their mobile phones differently than latecomers?<br />Kenya: SMS and Mobile Money<br />
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    • 7. Ezra Mbogori<br />Executive Director Akiba Uhaki Fund<br />Project Focus: Human Rights and Social Justice <br />“We want to use ICTs more in our human rights and social justice communication and outreach work….This [research] was very useful in terms of finding out who has access to what medium.”<br />The AudienceScapes research also clarifies “some of the claims different media outlets put out about being the most-watched station and that sort of thing.” <br />“We need this for more of East Africa – like Tanzania and Rwanda.” <br />
    • 8. World Bank <br />Kenya Office<br />Africa Region <br />Project Focus: Impact for the Poor of Cell Phones and Mobile Money Transfers<br />Using AudienceScapes and other data to assess reach and impact as an aid for future programmatic strategy in Kenya and elsewhere in the East African region. <br />Gabriel Demombynes<br />Senior Economist<br />World Bank, Nairobi<br />
    • 9. Millicom Ghana (Tigo)<br />Project Focus: Mobile Money for the Unbanked<br />Working with GSMA Development Fund to make mobile money services available to the poorest Ghanaians<br />“Our service will be focused on providing the unbanked and under-banked with easy access to a money storage and transfer service.” - Khuen How Ng, Head of Commercial Projects<br />
    • 10. MTN Zambia <br />Project Focus: Mobile Money Market Assessment<br />Analyzing data in other African countries and in Zambia to assess prospects for mobile money products in Zambia. <br />“There is great need for this baseline analysis [on mobile use] so we can understand the market….This will be a great help in Zambia.” – Daniso Ndolo, Market Analyst, MTN Zambia <br />
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    • 13. Quantitative Surveys: Findings<br />Many mobile phone users are borrowing from others, or even using a SIM in someone else’s handset<br />
    • 14.
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    • 16. The AudienceScapes Project<br />What Research Can Do For You:New ICT adoption and use - “Early Adopters”<br />We ask: How long ago did you buy your first mobile phone? Early Adopters answer “more than 5 years ago.”<br />We want to know: What made the first wave of mobile phone owners unique?<br />Ghana<br />Kenya<br /><ul><li>Early adopters had more education, on average, than later adopters
    • 17. Three quarters were between 15-45
    • 18. Early adopters were wealthier than later adopters, but still only 30 percent said their families can afford to buy expensive goods
    • 19. Rates of early adoption were much higher among men than women
    • 20. Early adopters had more education, on average, than later adopters
    • 21. Early adopters were wealthier than later adopters, but still only 35 percent said their families can afford to buy expensive goods
    • 22. Rates of early adoption were much higher among men than women
    • 23. Rates of early adoption were much higher in urban areas than in rural areas</li></li></ul><li>The AudienceScapes Project<br />What Research Can Do For You:Learn about new technology “Early Adopters”<br />We ask: How long ago did you buy your first mobile phone? Early Adopters answer “more than 5 years ago.”<br />We want to know: Do early adopters use their mobile phones differently than latecomers?<br />Kenya - Men<br />Kenya - Women<br />
    • 24. Contacts: <br />Peter Goldstein<br />Project Director<br />AudienceScapes<br />goldsteinp@intermedia.org<br />(M): 1-202-341-0042<br />Alex Wooley <br />VP - Business Development<br />InterMedia<br />wooleya@intermedia.org<br />

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