Wide Receivers
Play makers, prima donnas, highlight reels
Goals
• The goals of this lesson will be:
• Gain an understanding of the physical traits that NFL scouts are looking for w...
Wide Receiver Roles
• The wide receiver is expected to two three things
• Catch the ball
• Block for other wide receivers
...
Wide Receiver PhysicalTraits
• Today’s pass friendly NFL has driven the market for big, strong receivers;
however as long ...
Wide Receiver PhysicalTraits
• Here at the desired combine numbers for wide receivers:
40 yard dash: 4.55 seconds Broad Ju...
Basics of Film Review
• Once again, we turn to Phil Savage, formerGM of the Cleveland Browns and
current director of the S...
Basic Film Review
• Phil Savage says there are three key things to look at when evaluating wide
receivers
• Suddenness, wh...
Hands
• The #1 job of the wide receiver is to catch the ball. How can we determine
whether or not that a wide receiver has...
Hands
• The two major differences between
the QB chart and the receiving chart
• No INT numbers needed
• Behind line of sc...
Practice
• In this video we are going to watch Penn State standout Allen Robinson, #8.
• Watch the video and chart his pro...
Practice
• Did your chart look like this?
IfYoursWasn’t Quite Right
• Here are a break down of the plays:
Play # What Happened Play # What Happened
1 Five yard comp...
Routes
• The next thing that NFL scout look for when evaluating receivers is their
ability to use as many different routes...
RouteTree
• Route 1: Flat
• Receiver runs a short,
prespecified distance and
cuts to the side line
• Route 2: Slant
• Rece...
RouteTree
• Route 3: Comeback
• Receiver runs a medium,
prespecified distance and
cuts back towards the line of
scrimmage ...
RouteTree
• Route 5: Out
• Receiver runs a medium,
prespecified distance and
cuts out towards the sidelines
• Route 6: Dig...
RouteTree
• Route 7: Corner
• Receiver runs a long,
prespecified distance and
cuts at an angle to the corner
of the end zo...
RouteTree
• Route 9: Fade or Go Route
• Receiver runs as fast and as
far as he can in a straight line
towards the end zone
Suddenness
• What Phil Savage described in his video as suddenness can be described as
the receiver being able to accelera...
Suddenness
• Suddenness can be viewed on tape but we can also get a realistic preview in
the 10 yard split from the 40 yar...
Blocking
• As alluded to earlier wide receivers are expected to block for the running
back and/or other wide receivers
• W...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lesson 5

319 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
319
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lesson 5

  1. 1. Wide Receivers Play makers, prima donnas, highlight reels
  2. 2. Goals • The goals of this lesson will be: • Gain an understanding of the physical traits that NFL scouts are looking for when evaluating wide receivers • Learn what scouts look for on the field when evaluating wide receivers • You will complete an assessment at the end of this lesson
  3. 3. Wide Receiver Roles • The wide receiver is expected to two three things • Catch the ball • Block for other wide receivers • Block for running plays
  4. 4. Wide Receiver PhysicalTraits • Today’s pass friendly NFL has driven the market for big, strong receivers; however as long as the guy can play size doesn’t seem to matter for receivers. • 2013 First round pick for the St. Louis Rams,TavonAustin, is only 5’9” • If the receiver can play bigger than his body with a good vertical jump and great hands, it doesn’t matter his size.
  5. 5. Wide Receiver PhysicalTraits • Here at the desired combine numbers for wide receivers: 40 yard dash: 4.55 seconds Broad Jump: 10’0” 10 yard split: 1.60 seconds 20 yard shuttle: 4.15 seconds Bench press: 12 60 yard shuttle: 11.4 seconds Vertical jump: 36” 3 cone drill: 7.00 seconds
  6. 6. Basics of Film Review • Once again, we turn to Phil Savage, formerGM of the Cleveland Browns and current director of the Senior Bowl to give us a breakdown of the wide receiver position. • Please watch this video and take notes. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geLiqSSN-Uw
  7. 7. Basic Film Review • Phil Savage says there are three key things to look at when evaluating wide receivers • Suddenness, which we are going to call acceleration • Make Plays • Size/strength
  8. 8. Hands • The #1 job of the wide receiver is to catch the ball. How can we determine whether or not that a wide receiver has the ability to catch the ball at the right level? • Well we can start with a chart that resembles the QB passing chart • Download the Blank Receiving Chart from BlackBoard and proceed to the next slide.
  9. 9. Hands • The two major differences between the QB chart and the receiving chart • No INT numbers needed • Behind line of scrimmage (LOS) has changed to No Gain; if a receiver catches a ball behind the LOS and doesn’t make it to the LOS there’s no gain on the play and its important to chart that.
  10. 10. Practice • In this video we are going to watch Penn State standout Allen Robinson, #8. • Watch the video and chart his progress using the blank receiving chart which you can download from BlackBoard. • Also keep track of how many times he run blocks or blocks for another receiver. • Be mindful of the replays.This is broadcast film and not All-22 • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDzAtmj_4kA&list=UU3goSfAins9Aj8vWOHb xPZw
  11. 11. Practice • Did your chart look like this?
  12. 12. IfYoursWasn’t Quite Right • Here are a break down of the plays: Play # What Happened Play # What Happened 1 Five yard completion to the left hash 6 Run block 2 Incomplete to the left hash; 10 to 19 yards 7 Incomplete pass between the hashes; 0-9 yards 3 11 yard completion to the left hash 8 Fumble recovery 4 Run block 9 Run block 5 Forty-six yard completion to the right hash 10 Not involved
  13. 13. Routes • The next thing that NFL scout look for when evaluating receivers is their ability to use as many different routes as possible. • Some of this is the result of the offense; yet the best players can run crisp, clean routes. • The best way to learn routes is view the route tree.
  14. 14. RouteTree • Route 1: Flat • Receiver runs a short, prespecified distance and cuts to the side line • Route 2: Slant • Receiver runs a short, prespecified distance and cuts inward at an obtuse angle toward the opposite sideline
  15. 15. RouteTree • Route 3: Comeback • Receiver runs a medium, prespecified distance and cuts back towards the line of scrimmage away from the ball • Route 4: Curl • Receiver runs a medium, prespecified distance and cuts back towards the line of scrimmage towards the ball
  16. 16. RouteTree • Route 5: Out • Receiver runs a medium, prespecified distance and cuts out towards the sidelines • Route 6: Dig • Receiver runs a medium, prespecified distance and cuts towards the middle of the field
  17. 17. RouteTree • Route 7: Corner • Receiver runs a long, prespecified distance and cuts at an angle to the corner of the end zone away from the ball • Route 8: Post • Receiver runs a long, prespecified distance and cuts at an angle to the center of the goal post in the endzone
  18. 18. RouteTree • Route 9: Fade or Go Route • Receiver runs as fast and as far as he can in a straight line towards the end zone
  19. 19. Suddenness • What Phil Savage described in his video as suddenness can be described as the receiver being able to accelerate at a high rate • When the receiver gets the ball in his hand is he already at his top speed or does he speed up and cover ground faster than the defense?
  20. 20. Suddenness • Suddenness can be viewed on tape but we can also get a realistic preview in the 10 yard split from the 40 yard dash. • Remember the time we are looking for is 1.60 seconds to cover 10 yards
  21. 21. Blocking • As alluded to earlier wide receivers are expected to block for the running back and/or other wide receivers • When evaluating wide receivers we need to see that the receiver latches on to his assigned block and doesn’t give him room to make the tackle until the play is over. • If a receiver can catch and block; he will be a useful commodity for his team.

×