Saving Blackberry

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Using Near Field Communication to turn Blackberry phones into cutting-edge devices.

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  • - Market share for 3 brands from 2010-11
  • Level 1 like RFID tags (Smartcard, EZ Pass)Level 2 allows programmable encryptionLevel 3 allows for multiple step instructions to be followed by receiving devices
  • 1st level is standard PIN access2nd level is biometric scan3rd level is an emergency shutoff in case device is lost or stolen
  • - Allows option to apply coupons, rewards cards, and gift cards electronically stored on your phone
  • - Duel identification of photo and biometric scan for access to secure locations
  • we’re not finished innovating here at BlackberryTap phone to panel at entrance to home when leaving to shut off all non-essential electricitySecure home accessCan remotely start car and heat during the winter months or cool during the summer months before you even leave your home
  • - These are the items we use daily that Blackberry is looking to replace…simplifying our lives
  • Saving Blackberry

    1. 1. SavingBlackberry Tim Favinger Ben Gruitt Saliq Khan
    2. 2. Agenda• Current state of Blackberry phones• Introduce Near Field Communication (NFC) technology• Demonstrate content and social media strategy• Present the future of secure transactions (payment and access)• Additional technology applications
    3. 3. Where is Blackberry today? iPhone Android Blackberry
    4. 4. New Blackberry Strategy• Partner with content provider to develop seamless mobile ecosystem• Integrate and streamline social media apps• Fully embrace NFC and explore its future applications• Maximize security features to lure back white collar customers and corporate accounts
    5. 5. What is NFC?• NFC is a short-range communication technology that enables devices to exchange information with other NFC-enabled devices or certain NFC supporting cards.• Three levels of communication:  Level 1: Offer read and write ability enabling one-way communication (like a credit card).  Level 2: Contain math operations and have cryptographic hardware to authenticate access (like an ID card).  Level 3: Contain operating environments which allow complex interactions between the two cards.
    6. 6. The New Content PartnershipAmazon Blackberry Interface • Amazon App: Permits full access to Amazon account including all content • Enables full Kindle Fire and Amazon Video on Demand synchronization using NFC chips or Amazon Cloud Drive
    7. 7. Amazon Synchronization
    8. 8. Evolution of Social Media • SyncTap: Near Field Communication enabled Contact Exchange App for social media
    9. 9. Contact Information Exchange Megan Victor megan@ejournal.com (301) 555-8311 victorp@yahoo.com
    10. 10. Custom Exchange John Baker (301) 555-2089 baker@gmail.com
    11. 11. Securing Transactions • Encryption: Maximize customer confidence in secure communications • 3 levels of security: PIN, biometric scan, centralized system lockout
    12. 12. 3 Levels of Security Enter PIN Press Thumb to Icon
    13. 13. Blackberry Mobile Payments Ready!
    14. 14. Secure AccessJohn Doe
    15. 15. Applications in Development Home Energy EfficiencyRemote Car Startup and Access Secure Home Access
    16. 16. Conclusion House/Car Keys Hotel Key IdentificationCredit Cards Written Contact InfoID Badge Rewards Cards & Coupons
    17. 17. References• Anonymous. (March, 2012). Potential Uses of NFC That We’d Like to See. Retrieved from http://nfcme.com/potential-uses-of-nfc-that-wed- like-to-see/• Anonymous. (May, 2012). NFC as technology enabler. Retrieved from http://www.nfc-forum.org/aboutnfc/tech_enabler/• Anonymous. (April, 2012). Near Field Communication. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near_Field_Communication#cite_note- 34• Anonymous. (May, 2012). Retrieved from http://www.google.com/wallet/where-it-works.html• Chandler, N. (April, 2012). What’s the difference between NFC and RFID? Retrieved from http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/difference- between-rfid-and-nfc1.htm• Clark, S. (March, 2011). NFC Task Launcher expands potential uses of Android tag reading applications. Retrieved from http://www.nfcworld.com/2011/03/30/36757/nfc-task-launcher-android-tag-application/• Coulumbe, R. (February, 2012). In-depth on NFC. Retrieved from http://www.securityinfowatch.com/ article/10624824/in-depth-on-nfc• Crocker, P. (August, 2011). Mobile payments: forecasts, technologies, and opportunities. Retrieved from http://pro.gigaom.com/2011/08/mobile-payments-forecasts-technologies-and-opportunities/ ?utm_source=tech&utm_medium=editorial&utm_campaign=auto3&utm_term=407480+google-wallet-goes-live-with-nfc- payments&utm_content=oryankim• Kessler, S. (May, 2010). NFC Technology: 6 Ways It Could Change Our Daily Lives. Retrieved from http://mashable.com/2010/05/06/near- field-communication/• Kim, R. (September, 2011). Google goes live with NFC payments. Retrieved from http://gigaom.com/ 2011/09/19/google-wallet-goes-live- with-nfc-payments/• Walsh, S. (February, 2012). 12 practical uses for NFC. Retrieved from http://blog.freestyleinteractive .co.uk/2012/02/12-practical-uses-for- nfc/• Anonymous. (May, 2012). Near Field Communication. Retrieved from http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/nfc/index.html• Schonfeld, Erick. (January, 2012). Chart: How Google and Apple won the smartphone wars. Retrieved from http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/02/chart-google-apple-smartphone-wars/

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