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Snow Analysis for Numerical Weather prediction at ECMWF
 

Snow Analysis for Numerical Weather prediction at ECMWF

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    Snow Analysis for Numerical Weather prediction at ECMWF Snow Analysis for Numerical Weather prediction at ECMWF Presentation Transcript

    • Snow Analysis for Numerical Weather prediction at ECMWF Patricia de Rosnay, Gianpaolo Balsamo, Lars IsaksenEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather ForecastsIGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 1 ECMWF
    • Land surface data assimilation 1999 2004 2010/2011OI screen level analysis Revised snow analysis Structure Surface AnalysisDouville et al. (2000) Drusch et al. (2004) Optimum Interpolation (OI) snow analysisMahfouf et al. (2000) Cressman snow depth analysis Pre-processing NESDIS dataSoil moisture 1D OI analysis using SYNOP data improved High resolution NESDIS data (4km)based on Temperature and by using NOAA / NSEDIS Snowrelative humidity analysis cover extend data (24km) SEKF Soil Moisture analysis Simplified Extended Kalman Filter Drusch et al. GRL (2009) De Rosnay et al. ECMWF NewsLett. (2011) SYNOP Data NOAA/NESDIS IMS METOP-ASCAT SMOS IGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 2 ECMWF
    • Snow AnalysisSnow Quantities: - Snow depth SD (m) - Snow water equivalent SWE (m) – ie mass per m2 - Snow Density ρs, between 100 and 400 kg/m3 SD×ρS SWE= [m] 1000Background variable used in the snow analysis: - Snow depth Sb computed from forecast SWE and density model parameterization revised in 2009 (Dutra et al., J Hydromet. 2009)Observation types: - Conventional data: SYNOP snow depth (SO) - Satellite: Snow cover extent (NOAA/NESDIS) IGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 3 ECMWF
    • NOAA/NESDIS Snow extent dataInteractive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System- Time sequenced imagery from geostationary satellites- AVHRR,- SSM/I- Station dataNorthern Hemisphere product- Daily- Polar stereographic projectionResolution- 24 km product (1024 × 1024)- 4 km product (6044 x 6044)Information content: Snow/Snow freeFormat:- 24km product in Grib- 4 km product in AsciiMore information at: http://nsidc.org/data/g02156.htmlIGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 4 ECMWF
    • NOAA/NESDIS Pre-Processing - Pre-processing revised in 2010. - NOAA/NESDIS data received daily at 23UTC. - Pre-processing: - Conversion to BUFR - BUFR content: LSM, NESDIS snow extent (snow or snow free), and orography, interpolated from the model orograpghy on the NESDIS data points. Orography (m) included in the BUFR → used in the snow analysisIGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 5 ECMWF
    • Snow AnalysisSYNOP Pre-Processing: - SYNOP reports converted into BUFR files. - BUFR data is put into the ODB (Observation Data Base)Snow depth analysis in two steps: 1- NESDIS data (12UTC only): - First Guess snow depth compared to NESDIS snow cover NOAA snow & First Guess snow free put 0.1m snow in First Guess (First Guess snow free: < 0.01m of snow, ie SWE in [1; 4] mm; Update: SD 0.1m, snow density=100kg/m3, SWE=0.01m) - NESDIS snow free used as a SYNOP snow free data 2- Snow depth analysis (00, 06, 12, 18 UTC): - Cressman interpolation: 1987-2010 Still used in ERA-Interim - Optimum Interpolation: Used in Operations since November 2010 IGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 6 ECMWF
    • NCressman Interpolation ∑ ( wn S n − S b O ) Sa = Sb + n =1 N ∑w n =1 n - (Cressman 1959) - SO snow depth from synop reports, - Sb background field estimated from the short-range forecast of snow water equivalent, - Sb‘ background field at observation location, and - wn weight function, which is a function of horizontal r and vertical difference h (model – obs): w = H(r) v(h) with:  rmax − r 2  2 H(r) = max 2 ,0  rmax = 250 km (influence radius)  r + r2   max  1 if 0 < h Model above observing station h2 max − h2 v(h) = if – hmax < h < 0 hmax = 300 m (model no more than h2 max + h2 300m below obs) 0 if h < - hmax Obs point more than 300m higher than modelIGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 7 ECMWF
    • Some issues in the Cressman Snow analysis “PacMan” Snow Patterns where observations are scarce SNOW Depth and SYNOP data in cm (1) 20050220 at 12UTC 165°W 160°W 155°W 150°W 145°W 140°W 135°W 130°W 125°W 120°W 115°W 110°W 105°W 100°W 95°W 90°W 85°W 80°W 75°W 70°W 65°W 6 10001 5775°N 5 75°N 4000 2670°N 70°N 150 26 North 14 80 19 10065°N 92 13 15 65°N 20 38 43 50 America 49 30 77 45 35 2060°N 63 42 67 39 68 34 55 73 37 60°N 20 3555°N 0 6 6 3 33 6 18 26 26 1 2 50 10 23 2 15 26 32 18 10 19 21 361112 4 15 16 12 25 29 10 51 59 26 49 37 65 36 71 24 52 38 39 127 42 55°N 15 10 2005 15 4 5 12 7 24 2 9 27 27 71 46 36 45 40 1550°N 2 1 8 153 9 23 71 5172 60 34 50°N 6 4569 40 55 46 3 5 28 19 44 25 79 28 109 55 34 2 3 5 53 20 44 6 18 35 8 14 25 7 17 93 14 17 645°N 10 11 7 5 74 1 2 122 10 21 42 14 9 18 17 18 1527 45°N 2 5 3 5 2 10 3 3 3 0 2 3 1 165°W 160°W 155°W 150°W 145°W 140°W 135°W 130°W 125°W 120°W 115°W 110°W 105°W 100°W 95°W 90°W 85°W 80°W 75°W 70°W 65°W SNOW Depth and SYNOP data in cm (1) 20070212 at 12UTC 85°E 90°E 95°E 100°E 105°E 110°E 115°E 120°E 125°E 130°E 135°E 140°E 145°E 150°E 155°E 10001 400075°N 75°N 15070°N 70°N 100 Siberia65°N 65°N 50 20 2007 1560°N 60°N 1055°N “5 55°N 2 1 85°E 90°E 95°E 100°E 105°E 110°E 115°E 120°E 125°E 130°E 135°E 140°E 145°E 150°E 155°E
    • Snow Patterns, “PacMan” issues – example on 23 Feb 2010 Deterministic Analysis, T1279 (16km) SNOW Depth and SYNOP dataForecasting System IFS cycle 36r1 85°E (cm) Integrated in cm (1) 20100223 at 12UTC 90°E 95°E 100°E 105°E 110°E 115°E 120°E 125°E 130°E 135°E 140°E 145°E 150°E 155°E 10001 400075°N 75°N 15070°N 70°N 100 5065°N 65°N 20 1560°N 60°N 10 555°N 55°N 2 1 85°E 90°E 95°E 100°E 105°E 110°E 115°E 120°E 125°E 130°E 135°E 140°E 145°E 150°E 155°E ERA-Interim re-analysis, T255cm (1) 20100223 at 12UTC SNOW Depth and SYNOP data in (80km), IFS cycle 31r1 85°E 90°E 95° E 100° E 105°E 110° E 115° E 120°E 125° E 130° E 135°E 140° E 145°E 150° E 155° E 10001 400075°N 75° N 15070°N 70° N 100 5065°N 65° N 20 1560°N 60° N 10 555°N 55° N 2 1 85°E 90°E 95° E 100° E 105°E 110° E 115° E 120°E 125° E 130° E 135°E 140° E 145°E 150° E 155° E
    • Revised snow analysisWinter 2009-2010 highlighted several shortcomings of the snow analysis related to the Cressman analysis scheme as well as to a lack of satellite data in coastal areas, as well as issues in the NESDIS product pre-processing at ECMWF, fixed in flight in operations on 24 Feb 2010.Revised snow analysis from Nov. 2010:(from Integrated Forecasting System, IFS cycle 36r4) OI: New Optimum Interpolation Snow analysis, using weighting functions of Brasnett, J. Appl. Meteo. (1999). The OI makes a better use of the model background than Cressman. NESDIS: NOAA/NESDIS 4km ASCII snow cover product (substituting the 24 km GRIB product) implemented with fixes in geometry calculation. The new NESDIS product is of better quality with better coverage in coastal areas. QC: Introduction of blacklist file and rejection statistics. Also allows easier identification of stations related to MS queries.
    • Snow depth Optimum Interpolation1. Observed Increments from the interpolated background ∆Si are estimated at each observation location i.2. Analysis increments ∆Sja at each model grid point j are calculated from: N ∆ Saj = ∑ w i × ∆Si i =1 3. The optimum weights wi are given for each grid point j by: (B + O) w = b b : error covariance between observation i and model grid point j (dimension of N observations) b(i) = σb . X µ(i,,j) B : error covariance matrix of the background field (N × N observations) B(i1,i2) = σ2b ×µ(i1,i2) with the horizontal correlation coefficients µ(i1,i2) and σb = 3cm the standard deviation of background errors. ri1 i 2   ri i  2    zi i  2  µ(i1 , i 2 ) = (1 + ) exp −  1 2  . exp −  1 2   (Brasnett , 1999) Lx   Lx     Lz       O : covariance matrix of the observation error (N × N observations): O = σ2o × I with σo = 4cm the standard deviation of obs. Errors Lz; vertical length scale: 800m, Lx: horizontal length scale: 55km Quality Control: if ∆Si> Tol (σb2 + σo2 )1/2 ; Tol = 5IGARSS 2011, Vancouver, 25-29 July 2011 Slide 11 ECMWF
    • OI vs Cressman NIn both cases: ∆ S = a j ∑w i =1 i × ∆SiCressman (1959): weights are function ofhorizontal and vertical distances.OI: The correlation coefficients of B and b follow asecond-order autoregressive horizontal structureand a Gaussian for the vertical elevationdifferences.OI has longer tails than Cressman and considersmore observations. Model/observation informationoptimally weighted by an error statistics.
    • NESDIS 4km product- Data thinning to 24 km -> same data quantity, improved quality- Data Orography interpolated from high res (T3999, ie 5km) IFS
    • Snow Depth Analysis Old: Cressman NESDIS 24 km New: OI NESDIS 4km
    • Snow Water Equivalent Analysis increments(18UTC) Accumulated for January 2010, in mm of water Accumulated January 2010 In mm of water Old: Cressman NESDIS 24 km New: OI NESDIS 4km
    • Snow Depth AnalysisCressman, NESDIS 24 km OI, NESDIS 4kmCase study: 22 december 2009 – major snow fall in Europe- Removes snow free patches and overestimated snow patches- Better agreement with SYNOP data and NESDIS data
    • New snow analysis- Snow Optimum Interpolation using Brasnett 1999 structure functions- A new IMS 4km snow cover product to replace the 24km product- Improved QC and monitoring possibilities Number of SYNOP data used in the Analysis in January 2010 Identified a lack of SYNOP Snow depth data in Sweden
    • Use of Additional Snow depth data Since December 2010, Sweden has been providing additional snow depthData, Near Real Time(06 UTC)through the GTSSnow depth analysisusing SYNOP dataSnow depth analysisusing SYNOP data+ additional snowdataImplemented as anew report type,in flight from 29March 2011
    • Use of Additional Snow depth data control normalised fi28 minus fi29 Root mean square error forecast N.hem Lat 20.0 to 90.0 Lon -180.0 to 180.0 Date: 20101221 00UTC to 20110107 00UTC 500hPa Geopotential 00UTC Snow Depth difference (cm) Confidence: 90% Due to using additional non-SYNOP Population: 18 data in Sweden 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02  Impact on 500hPa Geopotential 0 -0.02 -0.04 -0.06 -0.08 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Forecast Day
    • Comparison against SYNOP data Old analysis (Cressman and NESDIS 24km) New analysis (OI and NESDIS 4km) RMSD between analysis and observations
    • Independent validationSodankyla, Finland (67.368N, 26.633E) Winter 2010-2011 ECMWF deterministic analysis SYNOP snow depths FMI-ARC snow pit and ultrasonic depth gauge Figures produced by R. Essery, Univ Edinburgh)
    • New snow analysisImpact RMSE Forecast 1000hPa Geopotentail in Europe Improved when above 0 Impact of OI vs Cressman (both use NESDIS 24km) Overall Impact of OI NESDIS 4km vs Cressman NESDIS 24 km
    • New snow Analysis Cressman +24km NESDISin Operations Old: Cressman NESDIS 24km OI Brasnett 1999 +4km NESDIS New: OI NESDIS 4kmFC impact (East Asia): - OI has longer tails than Cressman and considers more observations. - Model/observation information - optimally weighted by an error statistics.
    • Summary and Future Plans• New snow analysis implemented at ECMWF • Based on a 2D Optimum Interpolation • Uses Brasnett 1999 structure functions •Uses SYNOP and high resolution snow cover data from NOAA/NESDIS, • Flexible to use non-SYNOP reports (new report codetype) • Improved QC (blacklisting and monitoring possibilities).•OI has longer tails than Cressman and considers moreobservations.•Model/observation information optimally weighted with errorstatistics.• Positive impact on NWP. However extensive validation usingindependent data needs to be done•In the future, use of combined EKF/OI system forNESDIS/conventional information data assimilation.