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WE1.L10 - TERRA, AQUA, AND AURA DIRECT BROADCAST – PROVIDING EARTH SCIENCE DATA FOR REALTIME APPLICATIONS
 

WE1.L10 - TERRA, AQUA, AND AURA DIRECT BROADCAST – PROVIDING EARTH SCIENCE DATA FOR REALTIME APPLICATIONS

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    WE1.L10 - TERRA, AQUA, AND AURA DIRECT BROADCAST – PROVIDING EARTH SCIENCE DATA FOR REALTIME APPLICATIONS WE1.L10 - TERRA, AQUA, AND AURA DIRECT BROADCAST – PROVIDING EARTH SCIENCE DATA FOR REALTIME APPLICATIONS Presentation Transcript

    • Terra
      Aqua
      Aura
      IGARSS 2010
      July 28, 2010
      TERRA, AQUA, AND AURA DIRECT BROADCAST-
      PROVIDING EARTH SCIENCE DATA FOR REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS
      Angelita C. Kelly, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
      Patrick L. Coronado, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
      Warren F. Case, SGT Inc., NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
      Amelia Franklin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
      1
    • 2
      Purpose
      Provide an overview of the Earth Observing Missions
      Describe the EOS Direct Broadcast (DB) and DB/Direct Readout (DR) ground stations
      Discuss the benefits of DB and examples of how it is being used
    • 3
      Earth Observing Missions
      NASA and other space agencies have invested in Earth observing missions, including NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS), consisting of Terra, Aqua, andAura:
      Sun-synchronous polar orbits
      705 km altitude
      98.2 degree inclination
      Terra
      Aqua
      Aura
    • 4
      Earth Observing Constellations
      Landsat-5
      Afternoon Constellation
      Morning Constellation
      OCO-2
      (A-Train)
      GCOM-W1
      Terra
      Aqua
      SAC-C
      CloudSat
      CALIPSO
      EO-1
      Glory
      Aura
      PARASOL
      Landsat-7
      2010 07 27
    • 5
      EOS Data
      EOS science data are available two ways:
      All science data are recorded onboard and downlinked every orbit at 150 Mbps via:
      TDRSS (Terra)
      EOS Ground Stations at Norway, Alaska, and Wallops (Aqua and Aura)
      The data are processed, archived, and distributed (free of charge) to users worldwide
      Realtime science data are sent at 15 Mbps to DB stations
      Terra also has a Direct Downlink (DDL) capability for the ASTER instrument, but this has not been used operationally
    • EOS End-to-End System Overview
      Flight Operations,
      Data Capture,
      Initial Processing,
      Backup Archive
      Data Transport
      to Data Centers/
      SIPSs
      Mission Operations
      Science Operations
      Science Data Processing,
      Data Mgmt, Interoperable Data Archive, & Distribution
      Data Acquisition
      Distribution and Data
      Access
      Spacecraft
      Terra
      Tracking & Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)
      Research
      Aqua
      Education
      Aura
      Value-Added
      Providers
      Internet
      EOS Data and Operations System (EDOS)
      Data Processing
      White SandsComplex(WSC)
      (Search, order,
      distribution)
      Interagency
      Data Centers
      EOSDIS Data
      Centers
      DB data
      EOS Operations Center (EOC) Mission Control
      Earth
      System Models
      DirectBroadcast(DB)
      International
      Partners
      NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN) Mission Services
      EOS PolarGround Stations
      Decision Support
      Systems
      Data backup
      Schedules
      Instrument Teamsand Science
      Investigator-ledProcessing Systems
      (SIPS)
      Direct Broadcast/
      Direct Readout Stations
    • 7
      AIRS
      OMI
      MODIS
      CERES
      HSB
      AMSU
      AMSR-E
      What is Direct Broadcast?
      • Direct Broadcast (DB) is the satellite capability to transmit data in real-time to ground-based receivers. For EOS satellites, this is done almost continuously (24x7).
      • The latest estimate is that there are ~3,000 individual DB users associated with over 200 ground stations worldwide.
      Aura
      Aqua
      Terra
      MODIS
    • 8
      Registered EOS Direct Broadcast Sites Worldwide
    • 9
      Direct Readout Station
      • A Direct Readout (DR) station is a ground station that receives and processes DB transmissions.
      • The ground station can be
      • Developed in-house using relatively inexpensive hardware, or
      • Purchased from a commercial provider (currently ~ $ 200K)
      • Hardware (see below) and software for receiving the data,
      • Access to science application algorithms, and
      • A decision-making infrastructure.
      Minimum Hardware
      • Antenna (at least 2.4 meter aperture)
      • Antenna control unit
      • Frequency downconverter
      • Satellite receiver
      • Input/output board
      Source: http://directreadout.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.cfm?section=portal%20info&page=faqs_subject& topic=Terra
    • 10
      Direct Readout Laboratory (DRL)
      • NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) operates the Direct Readout Laboratory (DRL)as a technology and information resource for the DB community
      • The DRL acts as an intermediary between the missions and the DB community members that can make use of the science algorithms
      • Provides the algorithms (software) for processing the EOS data free of charge. See next slide.
      • Holds periodic meetings for the entire international DB community
      • Provides training (as requested)
    • 11
      DB Processing Software
      NASA provides the International Polar OrbiterProcessingPackage (IPOPP)software free of charge to DB users for processing MODIS and AIRS/AMSU/HSB data
      • The operational EOS processing software algorithms developed at GSFC and JPL were modified to be compatible with DB data
      • IPOPP enables ground stations to create several products (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU) for near real-time applications such as environmental monitoring and forecasting, fire monitoring, etc.
      • Several U.S. organizations (Oregon State University, University of South Florida, Univ. of Miami, Florida International University, and University of Wisconsin) and many international organizations also provide DB processing software based on the software used by the EOS Science Teams
      • Training is provided, as requested.
    • 12
      DB Benefits
      • Provides users a way to receive Earth observations in real-time
      • Provides easy and cost-effective access when broadband internet service is unavailable, restricted, or cost-prohibitive
      • Provides a secondary path for data to reach the ground with virtually no time delay
      • Serves as a back-up to the primary store and forward method and can be used to fill in data gaps for science processing
      • Real-time applications can be derived using NASA-provided software algorithms
      • Limitations:
      • DB users do not receive data from other parts of the world
    • 13
      Examples of DB Uses
      • Various countries and organizations capture and utilize DB data. Some of the operational applications include:
      • Weather forecasting
      • Disaster prediction, monitoring, and management
      • Fire identification and monitoring
      • Fisheries
      • Air quality monitoring
      • Water management
      • etc.
    • 14
      Examples of DB Users (1 of 5)
      US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service
      Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC)
      Salt Lake City, Utah
      RSAC
      • Collects TERRA and Aqua MODIS data
      • Detects and monitors forest fires
      • Provides data to Forest Service and other agencies for resource management and environmental monitoring
      • Provides assistance in applying the most advanced geospatial technology toward improved monitoring and mapping of natural resources
      MODIS image of Wolf and Copper fires near Los Angeles provided by RSAC
      http://www.fs.fed.us/eng/rsac/
    • Examples of DB Users (2 of 5)
      Sri Lanka National Aquatic Resources Agency (NARA)
      • Sri Lanka's fishery resources beyond the continental shelf waters are not fully exploited, while some coastal fishery resources are being over-exploited because of heavy expenses and lack of resources.
      • This Satellite-Based Fishery Forecasting System
      uses EOS DB data to provide accurate information
      on large shoals of fish in the seas and inland waters to:
      • Reduce the amount of fishing occurring along the coast
      • Increase production
      • Increase the quality of fish for export
      • Reduce the operational costs (search time and fuel) of multi-day fishing fleets
      • The initial experiments have shown positive results with fisheries corporation vessels netting large catches.
       http://www.nara.ac.lk/
      15
    • 16
      Examples of DB Users (3 of 5)
      Russia and nearby Territories
      ScanEx Network of Stations
      • ScanEx, a private Russian company implemented and operates several satellite stations. Their network includes 4 DB receiving stations utilizing 9 receiving antennas in Moscow, Megion, Irkutsk and Magadan
      • The stations collect data from more than a dozen satellites (including Aqua and Terra) covering all of Russia and the nearby territories
      • The MODIS DB data are used to observe the weather, map ice and vegetation, and monitor floods and fires
      http://www.scanex.com/en/stations/default.asp?submenu=uniscan&id=index 
      ScanEx Station
    • 17
      Examples of DB Users (4 of 5)
      Sodankylä Station, Finland
      • The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) helped develop the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board Aura, in cooperation with the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI).
      • FMI DB station produces near realtime ozone and ultraviolet OMI data products
      • Available via the internet 15 minutes after a pass since the end of 2004
      • Covers central Europe from the North Pole to the Mediterranean area.
      • OMI data were recently used by various volcanology centers in the U.S. and Europe following the Iceland volcano eruption.
      • Also receives MODIS DB data from Terra and Aqua:
      • Re-broadcast by the Finnish Meteorological Institute since March 2003
      • Delivered to other Finnish governmental institutes for scientific purposes and to NOAA’sNational Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
      http://fmiarc.fmi.fi/fmiarc_new/ozone.html
    • 18
      Examples of DB Users (5 of 5)
      Dundee Satellite Receiving Station
      Dundee University, UK
      • Systematically records satellite images on a daily basis since 1978
      • Maintains an up-to-date archive of images from NOAA, SeaStar, Terra, and Aqua polar orbiting satellites.
      • Receives and archives MODIS data providing much-improved spatial and spectral resolution. The archive is kept on tape and CD- ROM, with a photographic archive kept for quick browsing
      • Can supply either enhanced photographic images produced from the data, or the data itself via the internet, tape, or disk.
      http://www.sat.dundee.ac.uk/
    • 19
      Examples of DB Data
      MODIS true color image displayed using Google Earth offers a different perspective of the oil slick.*
      *Courtesy of Liam Gumley, CIMSS
    • 20
      Examples of DB Data
      MODIS Observation of the Jesusita Fire near Santa Barbara, California on May 8, 2009
    • 21
      Examples of DB Data
      Terra MODIS image of yellow rust infection of crop lands in the Middle East – April 2010
      Aqua MODIS image of the Arctic region June 28, 2010
      Aqua MODIS image of the Great Escarpment, South Africa, April 2010
      Aqua MODIS image of a phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Iceland – June 2010
    • 22
      Examples of DB Data
      Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull Volcano observed by MODIS on May 12, 2010
    • 23
      What is the Future for Direct Broadcast?
      • Some future missions that are planning to have DB capability include
      • National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP)
      • Joint Polar Satellite System (part of the former NPOESS)
      • Global Change Observation Missions (follow-on to AMSR-E)
      • The DRL is enhancing the IPOPP software which will enable the DB community to process, visualize, and evaluate Sensor and Environmental Data Records from NPP
    • 24
      Summary
      • EOS data are important and valuable not only for science but for everyday operational applications that benefit society
      • The DB community appreciates having the data and the software
      • The use of EOS DB data is increasing every year
      • The free software and data access from NASA makes DB an attractive and cost-effective option, particularly for developing countries
      • The continued availability of realtime EOS-type data for operational use is needed
      • NASA and other satellite agencies must consider this capability when planning future missions.
    • 25
      Mahalo!
      Thank you!
      Questions?
    • 26
      Additional Information
    • 27
      International Polar Orbiter Processing Package (IPOPP)
      • Needed by the Direct Readout community during the transition from EOS data to NPP and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) data.
      • DRL technologies developed for the NPP In-Situ Ground System (NISGS) will provide the IPOPP framework:
      • Freely available
      • Portable to Linux x86 platforms
      • Can be run efficiently on modest hardware
      • Simple to install and easy to use
      • Able to ingest and process DB overpasses of arbitrary size
      • Able to produce core and regional value-added Environmental Data Record products
    • 28
    • 29
      Examples of DB Users (6 of 6)
      Japanese Fishery Agency
      Information Services For The Offshore Fisheries Around Japan
      • The Japanese Fishery Agency is responsible for the management of fisheries resources in Japan
      • Management is mainly based on the total allowable catch, calculated from the allowable biological catch.
      • Terra and Aqua DB data help determine the time period, location, and abundance of the target fish (taking onto account migration routes), which must be recorded in near-real time.
      Priority species
      Several species have been selected for management because of their importance and popularity as a food resource, and also because of concerns about their abundance
      Japanese common squid
      (Todarodes pacificus)
      Mackerel
      (Trachurus japonicus)
      Pacific saury
      (Cololabis saira)
      Pollack
      (Theragra chalcogramma)
      Queen crab
      (Chionoecetes opilio)
      Laboratory of Marine Bioresource and Environment Sensing , Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University , Japan