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Mod 4 Class 1

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Libr 534

Libr 534

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  • The selection of print and electronic book and journal collections is among the most important activities for health librarians. Some important issues that health librarians contend with are: what is my annual collections budget? what is the overall scope of the library collection? how do I balance print and digital resource needs? free versus fee-based resources; determining differing content in print versus online versions; duplication of identical sources, multiple vendors, online access and authentication, adaptability of database interfaces and, of course, limited budgets. As physical libraries change from housing print collections to the almost completely digital, health librarians must find ways to perform collection outreach and liaison activities with user groups throughout their organizations. One of the primary challenges for health librarians in the digital age is the proliferation of scientific knowledge and evidence due to advances in biomedical research. Changes in information cycles are often a result of the way physicians are trained, how they practice and carry out their research; ultimately, this has an impact on the maintenance of a knowledge-base in the different medical disciplines and consequently how health librarians build collections.
  • Open archive—Circulating library stacks What is the impact on the last archival print copy when it is accessible to the public? 1. Volumes subject to additional wear 2. Volumes becoming lost, etc. Non-circulating depository What is the impact on the user of storing print issues housed in a non-circulating depository? Shared Consortium Responsibility for Print Journal Archives - What are the Terms of Agreements
  • Cherry picking this chart from an interesting paper full of data….we will explore this paper further This data broken out by discipline This data pertains to faculty….is the same true for students. Not sure I agree with there interpretation of this data but they say - Readings by social sciences, humanities, and medical/health faculty are more likely to be from print sources than are readings by engineering and sciences faculty. Humanities is the only subject discipline whose members use print sources more often than electronic sources. Work by Vakkari (2006) suggests this may simply be a matter of availability, with a much smaller percentage of humanities journals available in electronic format (Table 5).
  • Cherry picking this chart from an interesting paper full of data….we will explore this paper further - younger faculty members are much more likely to access readings from electronic sources than are their older counterparts. In fact, the percent of reading from print sources goes steadily up as the age of the reader increases (Table 24). - This data not broken out by discipline but some of her data is This data pertains to faculty….is the same true for students. More data (Table 20) shows
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    • 1.
      • LIBR534 – Health information sources & services
      • Module IV: Collect
      • Lecture 1- Transition to Online
      • March 11, 2010
      • Greg Rowell & Dean Giustini, SLAIS Adjunct faculty
    • 2.
      • Module IV Class I - Agenda
      • Collection Development in Biomedicine
      • Shift to e-journals
      • Shift to e-books
      • Articles
      • Break
      • Mini presentations reference tools - print vs online
      Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534
    • 3. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534
      • Learning objectives
      • By the end of this class you will have
      • Learned about issues, selection aids and criteria for collection development in biomedicine
      • Reviewed transition issues in move from print to electronic
      • Been given exposure to wide variety of reference tools – many of which have transitioned from print to online versions
      • Discussed the impact of the transition from online to print resources in biomedical libraries
    • 4. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534
      • Collection Development in Biomedicine
      • Collection Consideration
      • Selection Tools and Aids
      • Evaluation Criteria
    • 5. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534
      • Issues in collection development
      • what is my annual collections budget?
      • what is the overall scope of the library collection?
      • how do I balance print and digital resource needs?
      • free versus fee-based resources;
      • duplication of identical sources, multiple vendors, online access and authentication, adaptability of database interfaces
    • 6. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534 Discard or Retain Print Discard Retain - does E equal P - embargo on e-version - Is E ILL eligible - quality of e-version images - Non subscription costs - archive - shelving space - open or closed stacks - processing - personnel - user preference
    • 7.
      • Tenopir et al. 2009 Variations in article seeking and reading patterns of academics: What makes a difference? Lib Information Sci Res, 31: 139-148 .
      • Table 5
      • Source format of reading by subject discipline in the U.S. and Australia, 2004–2005
      • (n=1388, χ2=146.387, p=.000).
      • Age Source format of reading Total
      • Print Electronic Unknown
      • Med/Health 33.1% 61.7% 5.2% 100.0
      • Eng/Tech 18.9% 62.2% 18.9% 100.0
      • Sciences 24.3% 67.8% 7.9% 100.0
      • Soc Sciences 42.7% 51.1% 6.2% 100.0
      • Humanities 68.5% 27.6% 3.9 % 100.0
    • 8.
      • Tenopir et al. 2009 Variations in article seeking and reading patterns of academics: What makes a difference? Lib Information Sci Res, 31: 139-148 .
      • Table 24
      • Source format of reading by age of faculty in the U.S. and Australia, 2004–2005
      • (n=1357, χ2=76.479, p=.000).
      • Age Source format of reading Total
      • Print Electronic Unknown
      • Age under 30 9.8% 67.1% 23.2% 100.0
      • Age 31–40 28.5% 62.3% 9.1% 100.0
      • Age 41–50 40.5% 51.9% 7.5% 100.0
      • Age 51–60 44.0% 50.9% 5.2% 100.0
      • Age over 60 48.7% 48.1% 3.2% 100.0
    • 9. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534
      • Collection Development Tools
      • reference questions
      • reviews in scholarly journals or newspapers
      • approval books and slips
      • publishers' and university press announcements;
      • recommendations from physicians, nurses, pharmacists;
      • course reserve lists
      • standard lists, e.g., Brandon-Hill and Doody's Lists
      • catalogues from professional associations
      • stock lists from major vendors;
      • catalogues of government documents;
      • interlibrary loan requests;
      • Login Brothers newsletters.
      • Scholarly publishing and communication
    • 10.
        • UBC ebooks in the Life Sciences
    • 11. Jason Price and John McDonald, “To supersede or supplement: profiling aggregator e-book collections vs. our print collections,” November 6, 2008
    • 12. Rowell-Giustini – LIBR534 Evaluation Criteria
    • 13. Article exercise and discussion
      • Lingle, Virginia A. and Robinson, Cynthia K.(2009) 'Conversion of an Academic Health Sciences Library to a Near-Total Electronic Library: Part 1 ', Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, 6: 3, 193-210. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15424060903178879
      • Lingle, Virginia A. and Robinson, Cynthia K.(2009) 'Conversion of an Academic Health Sciences Library to a Near-Total Electronic Library: Part 2 ', Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, 6: 4, 279-293. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15424060903364750