Gef p acific iwrm gw integration dialogue pres

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third groundwater integration dialogue

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Gef p acific iwrm gw integration dialogue pres

  1. 1. Third UNESCO/GEF IW:LEARN Groundwater Integration Dialogue GEF Pacific IWRM Project 2009-2014 “IMPLEMENTING SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT IN PACIFIC ISLAND COUNTRIES”
  2. 2. GEF Pacific Project Area
  3. 3. Context 1000 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Figure 1: Percentage of Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water (2011) Pacific SIDS East Asia & Pacific World Average Caribbean SIDS AIMS SIDS 53% 89% 91% 93% 95% 1000 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Figure 2 : Percentage of Population with Access to Safe Sanitation (2 0 1 1 ) Pacific SIDS East Asia & Pacific World Average Caribbean SIDS AIMS SIDS 3 0 % 6 4 % 6 7 % 7 4 % 8 3 %
  4. 4. Additional Effort Required to Meet Post-2015 SDGs 20301990 2015 15 2 4 6 8 10 12 Population(millions) Population Using Improved Water Supply 2 .7 M actual 1 9 9 0 projected 2 0 1 5 required to meet SDG 5 .4 M 1 2 .8 M (total Pacific SIDS) 20401990 2015 15 2 4 6 8 10 12 Population(millions) Population Using Improved Sanitation 1 .7 M actual 1 9 9 0 projected 2 0 1 5 required to meet SDG (total Pacific SIDS) 3 .0 M 1 4 .7 M
  5. 5. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org Project Objectives • To improve water resource and wastewater management and water use efficiency in Pacific Island Countries • To balance overuse and conflicting uses of scarce freshwater resources through policy and legislative reform and, • To implement applicable and effective Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) and Water Use Efficiency (WUE) plans
  6. 6. Project Components • Component 1: Demonstration, Capture, and Transfer of Best Practices • Component 2: IWRM and WUE Indicator Framework • Component 3: Policy, Legislative and Institutional Reform for IWRM and WUE • Component 4:Regional and National Capacity Building and Sustainability Programme
  7. 7. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org Demonstration Projects 1. Watershed Management Federated States of Micronesia • Ridge to Reef: Protecting Water Quality from Source to Sea in the FSM Palau • Ngerikiil Watershed Restoration for the Improvement of Water Quality Samoa • Rehabilitation and Sustainable Management of Apia Catchment Vanuatu • Sustainable Management of Sarakata Watershed (GW)
  8. 8. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org Demonstration Projects 2. Wastewater Management & Sanitation Marshall Islands • Integrated Water Management and Development Plan for Laura Groundwater Lens, Majuro Atoll (GW) Nauru • Enhancing water security for Nauru through better water management and reduced contamination of groundwater Tuvalu • Integrated Sustainable Wastewater Management (Ecosan) for Tuvalu
  9. 9. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org Demonstration Projects 3. Water Resources Assessment & Protection Cooks Islands • Integrated freshwater and coastal management on Rarotonga (GW) Fiji Islands • Environmental and Socio-Economic Protection in Fiji: Integrated Flood Risk Management in the Nadi River Basin Niue • Using Integrated Land Use, Water Supply and Wastewater Management as a Protection Model for Alofi Town Groundwater Supply and Nearshore Reef (GW)
  10. 10. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org Demonstration Projects 4. Water Use Efficiency & Water Safety Solomon Islands • Managing Honiara City Water Supply and Reducing Pollution through IWRM Approaches Tonga • Improvement and Sustainable Management of Nieafu Aquifer Groundwater Resources in Vava'u Islands (GW)
  11. 11. http://www.pacific-iwrm.org
  12. 12. Key Messages – It’s the people thing! • Community to Cabinet – building the connectivity between local action and primary governance structures both as formal and informal conduits. • Doing is Seeing the Need – communities have traditional and experiential knowledge but the realisation that something is amiss is not always obvious. – Doing defines the needs and implements responses which heightens awareness and the need for better information thereby enabling a role for scientific and technical knowledge. – Doing also makes governance gaps obvious and provides a “real” reason for governance. Doing also demonstrates the benefits and thereby impetus for replication and upscaling. – Doing helps converts the skeptical
  13. 13. Integration’s Role in Sustainable Development • Integration is a tool within the overarching framework of sustainable development. • Integrations higher objective is thus to support sustainable development. • Integration seeks to improve responses to the degradation of PIC land and water ecosystems – Pressures of populations and demands on resource – Vulnerabilities expanded due to climate change What is at stake? • Biodiversity – terrestrial and marine • Water – fresh and coastal • Land • Ecosystem Services
  14. 14. Gaps/Barriers to Implementation of Integrated, Cross-Sectoral Approaches in PICs • Fragmented, sectoral efforts – Across different landscapes and government levels • Need to enhance capacity • Need to replicate and upscale good examples (such as IWRM) • Need for enhanced civil society participation • Need to improve linkages between land/water/forest and coastal area planning processes – “ridge to reef” approach • Need for base level knowledge for informed decisions
  15. 15. Environmental Stress Reduction Sustainable Development and Environmental Stress Reduction National and Regional Replication Local Action
  16. 16. The Elements • Buying Into Solutions – Supporting local level action and capacity building – Appropriate and workable local solutions – Demonstrating tangible household and environmental benefits – Gaining household level action – Implement at local absorptive capacity. • Sharing the View – Coordination and Cooperation Nationally and Regionally – Governance Facilitated through APEX Ctee – Effective and Efficient Project Management – Well Resourced and Delivered Communications – Demonstrating Benefits Through Tangible Results • Building Capacity – Learning from Doing through Demonstrations and Training – Making it Stick through appropriate policy frameworks – Knowledge acquisition, synthesis, application and sharing
  17. 17. The Elements • Sustainable Development and Environmental Stress Reduction – Informed Decision Making – Holistic approach to Biodiversity, Land and Water ie Integration – Climate Change Adaptations – Demonstrating Benefits – Monitoring and Reporting on Meaningful Indicators • Global, Regional, National and Local Impacts – CC Mitigation – Equity in implementation of adaptations and development of resiliency
  18. 18. PACIFIC R2R Program “Pacific Islands Ridge-to-Reef National Priorities - Integrated Water, Land, Forest & Coastal Management to Preserve Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services, Sequester Carbon, Improve Climate Resilience and Sustain Livelihoods “
  19. 19. GEF IW Ridge 2 Reef Program Structure • Program vs Project • Program consists of ‘independent’ national R2R projects ‘linked’ by a regional program support project • Overall Program Coordination
  20. 20. New GEF IW Ridge 2 Reef Project • Pioneers integrated approaches, with opportunities to go further thematically and geographically • Through the follow-up IWRM project • Through direct links with the national R2R projects • Leadership at the national and regional level • Opportunities for further upscaling and replication in GEF-6 and in Climate Change adaptation • Building and strengthening capacity in each PIC for integrated approaches and keep that capacity • Better opportunities for cross country cooperation
  21. 21. GEFPACIFICR2R • Component 1: National Multi-focal Area Ridge- to-Reef Demonstrations in all Pacific Island Countries • Component 2: Improved Governance for Integrated, Climate resilient Land, Water, Forest and Coastal Management • Component 3: Regional and National/Local Ridge-to-Reef Indicators, Monitoring and Evaluation and Knowledge Management • Component 4: Regional Program Coordination
  22. 22. Vinaka vakalevu Malo aupito Fa’afetai lava Tank yu tumas Kommol tata Sulang Kinisou Tubwa kor Kam raba Tagio tumas Meitaki maata Fakafetai lasi Thank you

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