George rossolatos seminar on branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods part 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

George rossolatos seminar on branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods part 1

on

  • 317 views

Seminar on Branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods ...

Seminar on Branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods
Tartu University, Estonia 13-14 May 2014
George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD
//disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com
http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos

Statistics

Views

Total Views
317
Views on SlideShare
317
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

George rossolatos seminar on branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods part 1 George rossolatos seminar on branding, brand equity, brand semiotic models and research methods part 1 Document Transcript

  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Agenda- Day 1 • Key branding concepts • What is brand planning? • Marketing brand planning conceptual models • Branding research methods • Emerging marketing perspectives and research methods in branding research • Brand equity in focus: Concepts and research methods • Semiotic perspectives on branding • Literature gaps in brand equity research and the contribution of the brand trajectory of signification • Q&A
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Agenda- Day 2 • Literature gaps in brand equity research and the contribution of the brand trajectory of signification • From the generative trajectory to the brand generative trajectory of signification • The levels, morphology and syntax of the generative trajectory of signification • The brand generative trajectory of signification • Rhetorical operations and figures: The missing links in the brand trajectory of signification • Brand equity semiotically revisited: Linguistic value as the semiotic counterpart of brand equity • Methodology: A qualitative research design facilitated by quantitative content analysis and multivariate mapping techniques • 9-step methodological framework for projecting a brand equity structure at the encoding stage of an ad filmic text • Content analysis • Case-study: Projecting the brand equity structure of the major UK Cereals brand players • Consolidated equity metrics • In quest for patterns of differential semic-cum-rhetorical ad textual configurations • Areas for further research • Q&A
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date What are brands? The marketing perspective  A name, term, sign, symbol, or design, or a combination of them, intended to identify the goods and services of one seller or group of sellers and to differentiate them from those of competitors (AMA)  Intangible assets that produce added benefits for the business (Kapferer)  Powerful entities because they blend functional, performance-based values with emotional values (De Chernatony)  A complex symbol, the intangible sum of a product’s attributes, its name, packaging and price, its history, reputation, and the way it is advertised (Ogilvy)
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date What are brands? The semiotic perspective • “A brand is a sign in the semiotic sense. It stands for something other than itself in some meaningful way” (Danesi) • Logico-semantic simulacra (in line with Greimas) • Constellations of different morphological components • Motivated signs hanging together in self-referential discourses through unique syntactical configurations Rossolatos A brand is more than a product Aaker
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Key branding concepts: Brand identity  Brand identity is a unique set of brand associations that the brand strategist aspires to create or maintain.  A brand identity structure consists of a core and an extended identity  Core identity  The central, timeless essence of the brand or least likely to undergo changes in line with shifts in market / competitive dynamics  The locus of core brand associations  Enduring meaning patterns  Extended identity  Peripheral brand associations  More likely to change in line with or in response to shifting market and consumer dynamics Aaker Examples of core brand identity  McDonald’s: Consistent product quality and customer service across selling points on a global scale  Coca-Cola: Quenches thirst  Michelin: Advanced-technology tires for the driver who is knowledgeable about tires  Johnson & Johnson: Trust and quality in OTC medicine
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Key branding concepts: Brand personality  A metaphorical way of conceptualizing a brand  “The set of human characteristics associated with a given brand, from gender, age to warmth, concern” (Aaker)  Who would a brand be if it were a person? An animal? A car?  Forging closer bonds with consumers by attributing anthropomorphic features to a brand  Example: Tony the tiger (Kellogg’s Frosties)  User personality (existing or ideal)  Example: Marlboro man, endorsers Key branding concepts: Brand personality  A metaphorical way of conceptualizing a brand  “The set of human characteristics associated with a given brand, from gender, age to warmth, concern” (Aaker)  Who would a brand be if it were a person? An animal? A car?  Forging closer bonds with consumers by attributing anthropomorphic features to a brand  Example: Tony the tiger (Kellogg’s Frosties)  User personality (existing or ideal)  Example: Marlboro man, endorsers
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Key branding concepts: Intended vs. (pe)received positioning • Positioning is not what you do to a product, but what you do to the mind of the prospect (Ries & Trout) • Intended brand positioning is equivalent to the projection of brand associations Key branding concepts: Brand Image • “Despite research agreement on the importance of image, the term is used so inconsistently that no two researchers are necessarily talking about the same phenomenon” (Stern). •“Inconsistent usage is the root of gaps between construct definition, methodological procedure, and focused theory development” (Dobni and Zinkhan, 1990; Keaveney and Hunt, 1992; Villanova et al., 1990). • “Image is generally conceived of as the outcome of a transaction whereby signals emitted by a marketing unit are received by a receptor and organized into a mental perception of the sending unit” “It can refer to a real-world sending entity such as a firm, product/brand, or store; it can also refer to a psychological entity such as a pattern of beliefs and feelings in a consumer’s mind stimulated by associations with the real-world entity; or it can refer to advertising or public relations messages” Consequently, the term refers to three different domains of reality - the external world - the consumer’s mind - the textual intermediary between the two •
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Key branding concepts: Brand Image • Marketing disciplines use the same or cognate words to refer to three different reality domains (Stern) • tangible entities in the physical world (i.e., brands as physical entities) • verbal and pictorial representations in the media • mental pictures in the consumer’s mind (i.e., brand associations) • Brand image as specific attributes that reflect brand associations • Are these unidimensional or gestaltic constructs? • Category image: Key image drivers, perceptual KPIs, points of parity • Brand-specific image: Points of differentiation, unique territories for attaining differential advantage • Positioning = nexus of associations about a brand’s semic universe in consumer memory linked to an expressive inventory (Rossolatos) Key branding concepts: Core vs. peripheral brand image attributes • Core brand image: Attributes that a brand will always uphold, regardless of environmental/cultural changes • Peripheral brand image: Secondary attributes that are less important to a brand, but essential for its enrichment • without mitigating the integrity of core brand image
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date The branding challenge De Chernatony Correctly identifying and relating the two parts of the iceberg Need for a brand grammar that may account for how multimodal rhetorical transformations occur at the intersection between these two layers Key branding concepts: Brand Equity (the pinnacle of branding)  “A set of brand assets and liabilities linked to a brand, its name and symbol that add to or subtract from the value provided by a product or service to a firm and/or that firm's customers” (Aaker/AMA)  “Customer-based brand equity occurs when the consumer has a high level of awareness and familiarity with the brand and holds some strong, favorable and unique brand associations in memory” (Keller)
  • George Rossolatos MSc, MBA, PhD //disruptiVesemiOtics// email: georgerossolatos123@gmail.com http://uni-kassel.academia.edu/georgerossolatos Ref.ppt Date Key branding concepts: Brand Equity (the pinnacle of branding)  “A set of brand assets and liabilities linked to a brand, its name and symbol that add to or subtract from the value provided by a product or service to a firm and/or that firm's customers” (Aaker/AMA)  “Customer-based brand equity occurs when the consumer has a high level of awareness and familiarity with the brand and holds some strong, favorable and unique brand associations in memory” (Keller) BRAND EQUITY THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE OF BRANDING Building and maintaining strong brands through strong, unique, favorable brand associations in consumers’ minds. Nestle in 1988 paid 8 times the net assets worth of Rowntree for acquiring the brand Why brand strength matters?  A strong brand can drive sales growth by increasing the ability of a business to attract new customers and to retain existing ones.  A strong brand can increase margins by commanding a price premium over competitors (Starbucks and Pringles).  Brands with strong bonds to consumers create barriers for entry to competitors; consumers will be reluctant to switch to new players, even when their products and services are of equal or higher quality.  A strong brand can ease entrance into new categories. Consumers know what to expect from a product with a brand name like GE or Samsung. They will recognize and trust the brand name in a new context.  Suppliers are more willing to work with companies that have a strong brand reputation.  Companies with strong brands have the option to minimize investment costs and risks when extending into new areas by licensing the brand to a third party and getting royalties in return (The Gap).  A strong brand can protect against downturns. Brand loyalists are more likely to stay with them through tough times. The reputation of brands such as Coca-Cola and Johnson & Johnson’s Tylenol enabled them to recover quickly from adverse publicity. (Hollis)