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Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
Assistive technology web quest gia johnson
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Assistive technology web quest gia johnson

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  • 1. Gia JohnsonFebruary 26, 2012
  • 2. All students are able to learn, as teachers we need to asses the strengthsand weaknesses of the students in our classrooms and incorporateUniversal Design for Learning into our lessons and classroom. UDIsuggests that teachers can remove barriers to learning by providingflexibility in terms of options for materials, methods and assessments(Rose & Meyer, 2002)This flexibility and customization is especially important for studentswith disabilities. These students benefit greatly when assistivetechnology and teaching strategies are incorporated into the classroom.These students are not intellectually impaired, they just learn indifferent ways or need to have hurdles to learning cleared, so that theycan have the same educational opportunities as their fellow classmates.Our goal should be to create a learning environment that is inclusive forthe disabled student and allows the student to be in a regular classroomas much as possible. Studies have indicated that students withoutdisabilities also benefit from inclusive classrooms.
  • 3.  Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) - A learning plan that provides the most possible time in the regular classroom setting. Inclusion – A term which involves bringing the support services to the child in the classroom, instead of separating the child from the other students. Learning Disability - a neurological disorder that affects one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using spoken or written language
  • 4.  Auditory Disability –a disorder that effects the way auditory information is processed by the brain Assistive technology or adaptive technology (AT) is a term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them.
  • 5.  Work to determine what type of help each student needs Communicate verbally, in writing and displayed in the classroom the rules, classroom expectations, schedules and assignments. Teach study skills and learning strategies Schedule breaks, allow student to work standing at the board Provide step by step directions, both verbally and in writing. Allow the student to complete assignments on a computer.
  • 6.  Lee Swanson (1999) and his colleagues  Show rather than explain found two major intervention practices  Supplement with more intact senses (use that produced large outcomes. One is visual cues, signals, handouts, direct instruction. The other is learning manipulatives) strategy instruction.  Reduce or space directions, give cues Teachers who were applying those kinds such as “ready?” of intervention: broke learning into small steps;  Reword or help decipher confusing oral and/or written directions administered probes;  Teach abstract vocabulary, word roots, supplied regular quality feedback; synonyms/antonyms used diagrams, graphics and pictures to  Vary pitch and tone of voice, alter pace, augment what they were saying in stress key words words;  Ask specific questions as you teach to provided ample independent, well- find out if they do understand designed, intensive practice;  Allow them 5-6 seconds to respond modeled instructional practices that (“think time”) they wanted students to follow;  Have the student constantly verbalize provided prompts of strategies to use; concepts, vocabulary words, rules, etc. and  Avoid asking the child to listen and write engaged students in process type at the same time questions like “How is that strategy  Excerpted from the LDA of California and working? Where else might you apply it?” UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute "Q.U.I.L.T.S." Calendar 2001-2002
  • 7.  Web application/e-reader to read stories aloud Icommunicator Digi-wave personal listening system Windows XP Assistive Software Computer/Laptop Spell check, grammar and thesaurus software I-Pad/I-Pod Touch Software – Tap to Talk, Easy Speech Pro, Vanguard Springboard, Proloquo2go, Vmax, Verbally and Lingraphica
  • 8.  For students with auditory disabilities a printed calendar listings assignments and class activities is a helpful tool. Providing written outlines and notes on class lessons will support students with both auditory and mild learning disabilities. Break down information into small parts for the student to understand and grasp. Incorporate memory tricks like mnemonics into your instruction. Use visual, auditory and tactile cues to augments teaching concepts.
  • 9. Students who have trouble focusing canuse graphic organizers to assist inarranging thoughts and ideas. This is aneffective tool for students with ADHD.
  • 10.  www.lessonbuilder.cast.org/ www.readingrockets.org www.signedstories.com/index.cfm
  • 11. ReferencesCennamo, Katherine S., Ross, John D., and Ertmer, Peggy A, (2010). TechnologyIntegration for Meaningful Classroom Use; A Standards-Based Approach. Belmont, CA:Wadsworth.Retrieved from http://www.cabrini.edu/communications/ProfDev/cardevChickering.htmlBehrmann, Michael M., (1995). ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted EducationReston VA. Retrieved from http://www.ericdigests.org/1995-2/mild.htmRetrieved from http://lessonbuilder.cast.org/Retrieved fromhttp://www.ldaamerica.org/aboutld/teachers/understanding/strategies.aspBehrmann, Michael M., (2011). ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted EducationReston VA. Retrieved from http://www.ericdigests.org/1995-2/mild.htmRetrieved from http://www.ldonline.org/article/Checklists_for_Teachers©Retrieved fromhttp://weac.org/Issues_Advocacy/Resource_Pages_On_Issues_one/Special_Education/special_education_inclusion.aspxCAST (2008), Retrieved from www.cast.org, www.udlcenter.orgWakeeld, MA (N.D.). Universal design for learning guidelines version 1.0. Retrieved fromhttp://nichcy.org/disability/specific/adhd/

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