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Questioning

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Questioning Questioning Presentation Transcript

  • Questioning
  • No hands rule Otherwise some students will never participate You can use software to choose a ‘victim’
  • Thinking time • Teachers don’t allow enough
  • Open or closed? Higher/lower order
  • Higher order questions • Up to 3 per lesson is usually enough • Move from what? and when? • - to how? and why?
  • Recall questions • Use sparingly • Can be spiced up with games – millionaire etc
  • An alternative to recall • Answers – not questions • Recall questions by their very nature tend to be closed and dominate the beginnings/ends of lessons. An alternative to recall is to provide students with answers and get them to devise the original question. This provides a reasonable starter activity.
  • Blockbusters • Students create own questions for revision
  • Loop Games Question 1 Question 4 Answer…… Answer 3 Question 2 Question 5 Answer 1 Answer 4 Question 3 Question 6 Answer 2 Answer 5
  • Hot spot- oral questioning • A student is selected to sit on the ‘Hot spot’ • Other members of the group direct questions • You cannot say ‘don’t know’, but can nominate another member of the group to answer • A league table is created where students keep track of their scores. • Hot spot pairings could be less threatening than an individual student • Use a stopwatch to keep pace up.
  • participation • Write in back of book • Mini whiteboards • Traffic lights/thumbs up or down • Discuss answer with partner
  • Prompts • For classroom display • Why would we want to know that? • What are the alternatives? • Could you tell me more about…? • How can we prioritise? • Is that always so? • What would we like to find out? • Is there another way/ reason/ idea? • Where is there another example of this? • Would you summarise …. Please? • What would we have done had we been there?
  • Framing the question • Apologise for asking – “I’m sorry to ask, but” • Ask for help – “ Can you help me with this problem?” • Allow choice in their answer These techniques may help to initiate cooperation from a student
  • • Position yourself carefully when questioning - Can you distribute your questions evenly from where you are standing? • Think about body language and frame of mind/tone of voice– what message does it send? • Vary the ways in which you want pupils to respond to your questions – give everyone a chance to contribute their ideas • Listen carefully to answers
  • • Allow thinking time after the answer is given – so that more thoughtful responses are encouraged.
  • Top Ten Tips 1. · Prepare key questions to ask; 2. · Ask fewer and better questions; 3. · Use appropriate language and content; 4. · Distribute questions around the class; 5. · Give pupils “thinking time” to respond to questions, and pause between them; 6. · Use questions to make progressive cognitive demands; 7. · Prompt pupils, give cues; 8. · Use pupils’ responses ~ even incorrect ones; 9. · Encourage pupils to ask questions; 10. · Listen, and acknowledge pupils’ responses positively.
  • What to do now • Vary how you ask questions • Write 3 higher order questions each lesson for a series of lessons ( share these with colleagues) • Limit recall /closed questions in your lessons • No hands rule • Try out software to choose your ‘victim’ • Stick prompts to your wall where you can see them clearly • Try out a game you haven't used before (To share) • Allow more thinking time and discussion in pairs • Get students to ask more questions in their work