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The Future is Already Here
 

The Future is Already Here

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Keynote about the future of libraries, change management, and technology over the next 5 years given to Western Kentucky University Libraries, August 24, 2011 by Jason Griffey

Keynote about the future of libraries, change management, and technology over the next 5 years given to Western Kentucky University Libraries, August 24, 2011 by Jason Griffey

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  • \n
  • grew up in Olive Hill, did my undergraduate at MSU, am a proud son of the commonwealth, and am thrilled to finally have my first speaking engagement in KY. Thank you.\n
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  • Stacks maintenance\n
  • Special Collections/Archives\n
  • We are here to think about how we get to the future\n
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  • Librarians LOVE books. But books are not, and have not been for a long time, the primary method of consuming media. \n
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  • Media expectations are changing\n
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  • access no ownership\n
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  • Kindle is next!\n
  • 48 hours of video are uploaded every minute, resulting in nearly 8 years of content uploaded every day\n\n
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  • Netflix's global subscriber base grew almost 70% over the past year, to 23.6 million users...that’s 7% of the entire population of the US\n
  • In the United States, Netflix represents more than 20 percent of downstream traffic during peak times," Sandvine wrote in a statement highlighting its "Fall 2010 Global Internet Phenomena" report. The company said that Netflix's traffic is heaviest (20.61 percent, to be precise) between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. local time--the venerable prime time for people to sit back, relax, and enjoy some programming.\n\nRead more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13506_3-20020434-17.html#ixzz1KkeGZQPX\n
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  • President Obama, in the state of the union on Tuesday, said that it was a federal priority to bring highspeed wireless access to 98% of americans in the next 5 years.\n
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  • Digital Divide Cost argument - Moore’s Law\n
  • In October 2009 John Walkenbach noticed that the price of the Kindle was falling at a consistent rate, lowering almost on a schedule. By June 2010, the rate was so unwavering that he could easily forecast the date at which the Kindle would be free: November 2011.\nSince then I've mentioned this forecast to all kinds of folks. In August, 2010 I had the chance to point it out to Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon. He merely smiled and said, "Oh, you noticed that!" And then smiled again.\nWhen I brought it to the attention of publishing veterans they would often laugh nervously. How outrageous! they would say. It must cost something to make? The trick was figuring out how Amazon could bundle the free Kindle and still make money. My thought was the cell phone model: a free Kindle if you buy X number of e-books.\n\n\n
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  • When was this written?\n
  • academic libraries have felt safe because no one wants our stuff. We have a captive audience. I imagine that pay phone operators once felt the same.\n
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  • Plenoptic Lens\n
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  • Recon\n
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  • So...who and when?\n
  • So...who and when?\n
  • So...who and when?\n
  • So...who and when?\n
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  • There have been several watershed moments in information sharing over the last millennium or so; Gutenberg and the printing press, the invention of mass media with the radio and television, the Internet. The cellular revolution in some ways is a natural outgrowth of the media before it. Indeed, it subsumes all of them, providing books, audio, and video as a part of its current incarnation. But the future of the mobile device is so much more than just as a platform for the media of the past. It is that, but it is also the mechanism of creation for entirely new types of information.\n \nThe Honeywell Kitchen Computer or H316 pedestal model of 1969 was a short-lived product made by Honeywell and offered by Neiman Marcus. It sold for $10,000, weighs over 100 pounds, and is used for storing recipes (but reading or entering these recipes would have been very difficult for the average cook as the only "user interface" was the binary front panel lights and switches). It had a built in cutting board and had a few recipes built in. There is no evidence that any Honeywell Kitchen Computers were ever sold. [3]\nThe full text of the Neiman-Marcus Advertisement seems to read:\n"If she can only cook as well as Honeywell can compute."\n"Her souffles are supreme, her meal planning a challenge? She's what the Honeywell people had in mind when they devised our Kitchen Computer. She'll learn to program it with a cross-reference to her favorite recipes by N-M's own Helen Corbitt. Then by simply pushing a few buttons obtain a complete menu organized around the entree. And if she pales at reckoning her lunch tabs, she can program it to balance the family checkbook. 84A 10,600.00 complete with two week programming course. 84B Fed with Corbitt data: the original Helen Corbitt cookbook with over 1,000 recipes $100 (.75) 84C Her Potluck, 375 of our famed Zodiac restaurant's best kept secret recipes 3.95 (.75) Corbitt Epicure 84D Her Labaird Apron, one-size, ours alone by Clairdon House, multi-pastel provencial cotton 26.00 (.90) Trophy Room"\n \nIt would cost 58,000 in today's dollars. \n \n
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The Future is Already Here The Future is Already Here Presentation Transcript

  • The Future is Already Here Jason Griffey Western Kentucky University Library August 24, 2011
  • The future is already here...
  • The future is already here... ...it just isn’t very evenly distributed. - William Gibson
  • Traditional Library Roles
  • Photo by ACPL - http://flic.kr/p/5pHMz1
  • Photo by lauren_pressley - http://flic.kr/p/z6Qd4
  • Photo by Ohio University Libraries - http://flic.kr/p/6fZP2W acquisitions
  • Photo by diylibrarian - http://flic.kr/p/HWiUw
  • Photo by susansimon - http://flic.kr/p/8NNRtd
  • Photo by Vermin Inc - http://flic.kr/p/4yxj6u
  • Experiences becomeExpectations
  • “In education, this means the end ofthe one-way passing along ofknowledge to students. For theyalready live in a “field” of knowledgecreated by new media which, thoughdifferent in kind, is yet far richer andmore complex than any ever taughtvia traditional curricula.”
  • Services
  • Photo by HackingNetflix - http://flic.kr/p/5rQKpe
  • Devices
  • Photo by thekellyscope - http://flic.kr/p/96nYuV
  • Access
  • 42.1% of all Internet traffic at UTC was streaming media
  • Photo by Bryan Gosline - http://flic.kr/p/362n8r
  • Photo by HowardLake - http://flic.kr/p/8zSXff
  • Digital Divide
  • The Future
  • “When your old world is collapsing andeverything is changing at a furious pitch,to start announcing your preferences forold values is not the act of a seriousperson.It is frivolous, fatuous...
  • ...If you were to knock on the door of one ofthese critics and say “Sir, there are flamesleaping out of your roof, your house isburning,” under these conditions he wouldthen say to you, “That’s a very interestingpoint of view. Personally, I couldn’t disagreewith you more.”...
  • ...That’s all these critics are saying. Theirhouse is burning and they’re saying, “Don’tyou have any sense of values, simplytelling people about fire when you shouldbe thinking about the serious content, thenoble works of the mind?”Value is irrelevant.”
  • Photo by Caro Wallis - http://flic.kr/p/7Hc1WT
  • Masatoshi Ishikawa
  • Masatoshi Ishikawa
  • moving forward
  • “The movement of information atapproximately the speed of light hasbecome by far the largest industry of theworld. The consumption of thisinformation has become correspondinglythe largest consumer function in theworld...
  • ...The globe has become on one hand acommunity of learning, and at the sametime...the globe has become a tiny village.Patterns of human association based onslower media have become overnight notonly irrelevant and obsolete, but a threat tocontinued existence and to sanity.”
  • ?
  • Marshall McLuhanMcCluhan Hot & Cool 1967
  • Photo by x-ray delta one - http://flic.kr/p/87gkH5
  • Photo by ACPL - http://flic.kr/p/5pHMz1
  • Photo by niallkennedy - http://flic.kr/p/21ZZ7D
  • Photo by lauren_pressley - http://flic.kr/p/z6Qd4
  • Photo by chelmsfordpubliclibrary - http://flic.kr/p/4noiMY
  • Photo by Ohio University Libraries - http://flic.kr/p/6fZP2W acquisitions
  • Photo by William Hook - http://flic.kr/p/4UTJwU
  • Photo by diylibrarian - http://flic.kr/p/HWiUw
  • Photo by susansimon - http://flic.kr/p/8NNRtd
  • Douglas Adams said...
  • Douglas Adams said...1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
  • Douglas Adams said...1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.2. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
  • Douglas Adams said...1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.2. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.3. Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.
  • If I’d askedthem what theywanted, they’dhave said afaster horse. - Henry Ford
  • The best way to predict the future is to create it. -Peter Drucker
  • thank you
  • Jason Griffey Email: griffey@gmail.com Site: jasongriffey.net gVoice: 423-443-4770 Twitter: @griffey Other: Perpetual Beta ALA TechSource Head of Library Information Technology http://pinboard.in/u:griffey/ University of Tennessee at Chattanooga