Realtime Web

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  • Law libraries are NOT my specialty...academic/technology are. But communication patterns and paths are a universal need in libraries. New Streams of Library Communications is a great topic, and I’ve prepared two different talks today revolving around this them...this first one is about perhaps the newest web communications pattern.
  • The realtime web is that part of the web that is extraordinarily communicative.
  • Twitter has already been extraordinarily useful for real-time news. It was used extensively by the “media” when the plane crashed on the hudson river US Airways Flight 1549, January 15, 2009

    Research reported in New Scientist in May 2008[88] found that blogs, maps, photo sites and instant messaging systems like Twitter did a better job of getting information out during emergencies than either the traditional news media or government emergency services. The study also found that those using Twitter during the fires in California in October 2007 kept their followers (who were often friends and neighbors) informed of their whereabouts and of the location of various fires minute by minute. Organizations that support relief efforts are also using Twitter. The American Red Cross started using Twitter[89] to exchange minute-to-minute information about local disasters including statistics and directions.[90]

    During the 2008 Mumbai attacks eyewitnesses sent an estimated 80 tweets every 5 seconds. Twitter users on the ground helped compile a list of the dead and injured. In addition, users sent out vital information such as emergency phone numbers and the location of hospitals needing blood donations.[91] CNN called this "the day that social media appeared to come of age" since many different groups made significant use of Twitter to gather news and coordinate responses.[91]

    In January 2009, US Airways Flight 1549 experienced multiple bird strikes and had to be ditched in the Hudson River. Janis Krums, a passenger on one of the ferries that rushed to help, took a picture of the downed plane as passengers were still evacuating and sent it to Twitpic before any other media arrived at the scene.[92][93]

    The Australian Country Fire Authority used Twitter to send out regular alerts and updates regarding the February 2009 Victorian bushfires.[94] During this time the Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, also used his Twitter account to send out information on the fires, how to donate money and blood, and where to seek emergency help.[95]

    Also in April, public health departments used Twitter to provide updates on H1N1 cases.[96]
    Use in criminal proceedings

    The first criminal prosecution arising from Twitter posts began in April 2009. Agents of the FBI arrested Daniel Knight Hayden, a supporter of the Tea Party protests against the policies of US President Barack Obama. Hayden was allegedly sending tweets threatening violence in connection with his plan to attend that protest in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.[97]

    In July 2009, Horizon Realty Group, a Chicago real estate management company, sued a former tenant, Amanda Bonnen, for libel based on a Twitter message sent to friends. Horizon contends that Bonnen defamed Horizon by posting a tweet to her friends that said, "You should just come anyway. Who said sleeping in a moldy apartment was bad for you? Horizon realty thinks it's ok." Horizon asked for at least $50,000 for the alleged libel.[98] The lawsuit prompted widespread comment from journalists, bloggers, and legal experts.[99]
  • Similar to Twitter, but brings in all sorts of other media besides small text updates...photos, audio, video, etc.
  • Coined by Anil Dash (early and influential blogger who started in 1999, chief evangelist of Six Apart), it describes the immediate or nearly immediate delivery of information from publisher to reader.
  • PubSubHubbub is an open protocol for distributed Publish/subscribe communication on the internet. The protocol extends the Atom and RSS protocols for data feeds. The main purpose is to provide near-instant notifications of change updates, which would improve on the typical situation where a client periodically polls the feed server at some arbitrary interval.

    Under PubSubHubbub, there is an ecosystem of publishers, subscribers, and hubs [1].

    A subscriber initially pulls the Atom or RSS feed in the conventional way, i.e. by requesting it from the feed server. The subscriber then inspects the feed, and if it references a hub, the subscriber can subscribe to the feed URL topic on that hub. The subscriber runs a server so that hubs can directly notify it when any of its subscribed topics have updated.

    Publishers expose their content as Atom or RSS feeds, but with the inclusion of hub references. They post notifications to those referenced hubs whenever they publish something. Thus, when a publication event occurs, the publisher calls its hubs and the hubs call their subscribers.
  • Dave Winer: RSS Cloud is an extension to the RSS protocol that enables real-time push notifications or distributed Publish/subscribe communication for feeds. This is done using a <cloud> element where more information is given on how a subscriber should request updates. RSS Cloud is not limited to RSS feeds but can also be used with other feed formats such as Atom. On September 7th 2009 WordPress became the first large supporter of the protocol, enabling the <cloud> tag for over 7.5 million hosted blogs on WordPress.com [1].

    Another protocol providing roughly the same is PubSubHubbub.
  • WARNING: Technical content ahead.

    RSS. Simple syndication....a simple call and response system, and the web in general
  • WARNING: Technical content ahead.

    RSS. Simple syndication....a simple call and response system, and the web in general
  • WARNING: Technical content ahead.

    RSS. Simple syndication....a simple call and response system, and the web in general
  • WARNING: Technical content ahead.

    RSS. Simple syndication....a simple call and response system, and the web in general
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • A bit more complicated, but here’s how these work
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • they are scalable...so you can have multiples of any piece
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • How it’s being used.
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • Content holders can talk to each other
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • what if catalog record enhancements were pushed to ILS's directly via pubsubhub or rssCloud?
  • Google Wave is a completely new way of thinking about communication online.
  • To paraphrase one of the Google engineers, it’s what you might get if you redesigned email for the 21st Century.
  • Google Wave will allow both synchronous and asynchronous communication, letting anyone that is part of a Wave interact with it at any time.
  • Google Wave shows you what others are doing on the Wave in realtime, keystroke by keystroke.a
  • Anyone that is part of a Wave can edit any part of it, treating it like a communal document...but with full revision history and the ability to replay the edits.
  • It also supports complicated robots which can be programmed to respond to text in specific ways. Imagine a robot that could automatically recognize a Call Number and create a link to your catalog on the fly. Or one that was programmed with the top 20 most asked reference questions.
  • Waves can be embedded in webpages, much like YouTube videos. This means multiple simultaneous edits of a single ongoing conversation are possible, from any webpage you wish.
  • Google has said that the code for Wave will be Open Source, and Waves can be hosted anywhere. The protocol will allow all of the installs to cooperate freely. So every library can have their own server, hosting their own Waves...but all of them will be interoperable and can share information.
  • Most information seeking online lacks human filters. If we aren’t careful, it may complete the disenfranchisement of librarians as answer-agents online. When communication interactions scale easily, and communities that form around topic areas are trivially easy to locate and join, information seeking will move towards those communities.

Transcript

  • 1. realtime expectations & ruminations
  • 2. realtime web
  • 3. twitter
  • 4. friendfeed
  • 5. facebook
  • 6. pushbutton
  • 7. pubsubhubbub
  • 8. RSSCloud
  • 9. Pub Sub
  • 10. Request Pub Sub
  • 11. Request Pub Sub Content
  • 12. Pub Sub
  • 13. Request Pub Sub
  • 14. Request Pub Sub Content
  • 15. Pub Hub Content Request Sub
  • 16. Pub Hub H ubSub Content Request Sub
  • 17. Pub Hub H ubSub Content Sub
  • 18. Pub Hub Sub
  • 19. Conte Pub nt Hub Sub
  • 20. Conte Pub nt Hub e nt o nt C Sub
  • 21. Conte Pub nt Hub e nt o nt C Sub Sub Sub
  • 22. Conte Pub nt Hub nt te C on Sub Sub Sub
  • 23. Hub Conte Pub nt Hub nt te C on Sub Sub Sub
  • 24. Hub n t nte Co Conte Pub nt Hub nt te C on Sub Sub Sub
  • 25. Sub Hub n t nte Co Sub Conte Pub nt Hub nt te C on Sub Sub Sub
  • 26. Content Sub Pub Hub n t nte Co Sub Conte Pub nt Hub nt te C on Sub Sub Sub
  • 27. Blog
  • 28. Blog Hub
  • 29. Conte Blog nt Hub
  • 30. Conte Blog nt Hub e nt o nt C gReader Webpage Fever
  • 31. Twitter
  • 32. Twitter Hub
  • 33. Conte Twitter nt Hub
  • 34. Conte Twitter nt Hub e nt o nt C FriendFeed tumblr facebook
  • 35. Cataloger
  • 36. Cataloger LC
  • 37. MARC Cataloger /XML LC
  • 38. MARC Cataloger /XML LC L X M C / A R M UTC Public Law
  • 39. one more
  • 40. Google Wave
  • 41. new
  • 42. redesign
  • 43. sync & async
  • 44. realtime
  • 45. editable
  • 46. robots
  • 47. embeddable
  • 48. open source
  • 49. change everything
  • 50. Thank you.
  • 51. www.delicious.com/griffey/sandall speakerrate.com/griffey
  • 52. Jason Griffey Email: griffey@gmail.com Site: jasongriffey.net Twitter: @griffey Book: Library Blogging Other: LITABlog, TechSource Head of Library Information Technology University of Tennessee at Chattanooga www.delicious.com/griffey/sandall speakerrate.com/griffey
  • 53. Jason Griffey Email: griffey@gmail.com Site: jasongriffey.net Twitter: @griffey Book: Library Blogging Other: LITABlog, TechSource Head of Library Information Technology University of Tennessee at Chattanooga www.delicious.com/griffey/sandall speakerrate.com/griffey