Mobile - Internet Librarian 2009
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My small part of the Internet Librarian 2009 presentation on Mobile Technologies and Libraries.

My small part of the Internet Librarian 2009 presentation on Mobile Technologies and Libraries.

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  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • So, let’s talk about some library-specific issues.
  • Libraries have two areas that we’re known for:
  • Libraries have two areas that we’re known for:
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • This is a whole new type of information delivery. It’s been imagined for quite some time, but is only now coming to life. Layar, Enkin, Yelp.
  • Now...what happens when people start treating the real world like Wikipedia? What about marking up an area with crime stats? Or with complaints from the Better Business Bureau?
  • There have been several watershed moments in information sharing over the last millennium or so; Gutenberg and the printing press, the invention of mass media with the radio and television, the Internet. The cellular revolution in some ways is a natural outgrowth of the media before it. Indeed, it subsumes all of them, providing books, audio, and video as a part of its current incarnation. But the future of the mobile device is so much more than just as a platform for the media of the past. It is that, but it is also the mechanism of creation for entirely new types of information. <br /> &#xA0; <br /> The Honeywell Kitchen Computer or H316 pedestal model of 1969 was a short-lived product made by Honeywell and offered by Neiman Marcus. It sold for $10,000, weighs over 100 pounds, and is used for storing recipes (but reading or entering these recipes would have been very difficult for the average cook as the only "user interface" was the binary front panel lights and switches). It had a built in cutting board and had a few recipes built in. There is no evidence that any Honeywell Kitchen Computers were ever sold. [3] <br /> The full text of the Neiman-Marcus Advertisement seems to read: <br /> "If she can only cook as well as Honeywell can compute." <br /> "Her souffles are supreme, her meal planning a challenge? She&apos;s what the Honeywell people had in mind when they devised our Kitchen Computer. She&apos;ll learn to program it with a cross-reference to her favorite recipes by N-M&apos;s own Helen Corbitt. Then by simply pushing a few buttons obtain a complete menu organized around the entree. And if she pales at reckoning her lunch tabs, she can program it to balance the family checkbook. 84A 10,600.00 complete with two week programming course. 84B Fed with Corbitt data: the original Helen Corbitt cookbook with over 1,000 recipes $100 (.75) 84C Her Potluck, 375 of our famed Zodiac restaurant&apos;s best kept secret recipes 3.95 (.75) Corbitt Epicure 84D Her Labaird Apron, one-size, ours alone by Clairdon House, multi-pastel provencial cotton 26.00 (.90) Trophy Room" <br /> &#xA0; <br /> It would cost 58,000 in today&apos;s dollars. <br /> &#xA0;
  • "If I&apos;d asked them what they wanted, they&apos;d have said a faster horse" - Henry Ford
  • Tools don&apos;t get socially interesting until they get technologically boring. - Clay Shirkey <br /> <br /> This means that while they are still technologically interesting, we had better get comfy with them. Because if we fail to do so, the resulting socially interesting period will leave us far, far behind. <br /> <br /> The current generation, the one we&apos;re living in, is the largest increase in expressive capability in human history.

Mobile - Internet Librarian 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Mobile ubiquitous & revolutionary
  • 2. future
  • 3. 4G WiMax LTE
  • 4. libraries
  • 5. content services
  • 6. content
  • 7. text audio video
  • 8. augmented reality
  • 9. If I'd asked them what they wanted, they'd have said a faster horse. -- Henry Ford
  • 10. Tools don't get socially interesting until they get technologically boring. -- Clay Shirkey
  • 11. Mobile Technologies & Libraries coming in early 2010 Neal Schuman - The Tech Set
  • 12. Thank you.
  • 13. www.delicious.com/griffey/sandall speakerrate.com/griffey
  • 14. Jason Griffey Email: griffey@gmail.com Site: jasongriffey.net gVoice: 423-443-4770 Twitter: @griffey Book: Library Blogging Other: LITABlog, TechSource Head of Library Information Technology University of Tennessee at Chattanooga www.delicious.com/griffey/sandall speakerrate.com/griffey