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Mississippi State Emerging Technologies Summit 2010
 

Mississippi State Emerging Technologies Summit 2010

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Keynote presentation for the Mississippi State University Library's Emerging Technologies Summit 2010.

Keynote presentation for the Mississippi State University Library's Emerging Technologies Summit 2010.

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  • The internet is a disintermediation machine. Because it takes communication channels and reduces them to effectively zero distance, it removes the need for middle-men in nearly all ways. <br /> <br /> Anyone here familiar with 4chan? <br />
  • Music: Amanda Palmer, Nine Inch Nails, Jonathan Coulton <br /> Books: authors offering their work directly via Amazon or iBooks <br /> Telecom: Skype, Google Voice <br /> Publishing: Blogs, Wikis (wikipedia), etc <br /> Video: Youtube <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • What are the functions of a library, socially speaking? <br /> <br /> I recently wrote: &#x201C; <br />
  • So...what does this make libraries? <br />
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  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • How has the Internet disintermediated libraries over the last 10 years? The first casualty of the Internet upon libraries was probably ready reference. Just 2 decades ago, if you wanted to know how old Oprah Winfrey was, the fastest way to find out would have been to visit the local library and look it up. Just think about the sheer number of things that it was impossible to know without a library prior to Google in 1998. <br /> <br /> One of the hallmarks, according to Clay Shirky, of a successful 2.0 endeavor is how often it sends you somewhere else. Libraries have gotten very, very good at that. <br />
  • What else do we stand to lose? <br />
  • So, now I&#x2019;d like to talk a bit about what the current state of connectivity looks like, and what is likely to drive the next round of disintermediation. <br />
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  • What I hear, time and time again, is issues with Digital Divide. <br />
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  • 2 Terabytes: Academic research library <br /> 10 Terabytes: Printed collection of the U. S. Library of Congress <br /> 2 Petabytes: All U. S. academic research libraries <br /> <br /> You could download the entire Library of Congress in about a day. 1 terabyte would take about 2 hours. Or an uncompressed DVD in 32 seconds.and a blu ray in 6 minutes. <br />
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  • There are, at the time of this writing, at least 4.1 billion mobile phone subscriptions in the world according to International Telecommunications Union (ITU), an agency of the UN. In december of 2009, the population of the earth is estimated to be 6.8 billion...so 60 percent of the globe owns a cell phone. <br />
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  • By 2010, the United Nations estimates that 90% of the world&#x2019;s population will have access to a cell phone signal. <br />
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  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23] <br />
  • I also hear a lot of questions about cost, cost, cost. Let&#x2019;s not forget Moore&#x2019;s Law, The law is named after Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore, who described the trend in his 1965 paper. <br />
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  • 6.5% of the cost over 20 years. And Moore&#x2019;s law tells us that cost doesn&#x2019;t equal reduced capability...indeed, it means an increase in capabilities over the cost of the reduction in price. There is no other good that I can think of that gets cheaper AND better at the same time. <br />
  • So now I want to take some time to look at modern media consumption options, and try to find the context in which the library makes sense. Let&#x2019;s see how people are actually getting content these days. <br />
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  • Will stream netflix, and from your iTunes library, as well as iPhoto. Plus Airplay changes the game. <br />
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  • The scale of youtube is beyond anything, really, that any media has ever known. People are watching 2 billion videos a day on YouTube and uploading hundreds of thousands of videos daily. In fact, every minute, 24 hours of video is uploaded to YouTube. <br />
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  • For libraries, what do these all have in common? <br />
  • On September 10, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held in Vernor v. Autodesk that the first sale and the essential step doctrines do not apply to purchasers of a copy of software when the software was initially provided under a restrictive license. The Autodesk decision provides software companies with a useful tool under the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 (the Copyright Act) to prevent unauthorized third parties from reselling licensed software.&#xA0;&#xA0;&#xA0;&#xA0; <br />
  • Libraries are popular because they offset cost. Media is moving towards a non-physical consumption model where the cost is buried in subscription fees, and don&#x2019;t relate to the container. For people where the cost is the driving factor, piracy is one option. <br />
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  • textbook by Everett Rogers (1962), Diffusion of Innovations (Rogers 1962). He defines diffusion as "the process by which an innovation is communicated through certain channels over time among the members of a social system." [1] <br />
  • If I&#x2019;d asked them what they wanted, they&#x2019;d have said a faster horse. - Henry Ford <br /> <br /> Talking about the innovation curve, Libraries need to be at the leading edge, in that Innovators part of the curve, because of this...if we rely on the patrons to tell us what they want, we cease innovating and become moribund. <br />
  • ...especially when they are about the future. - Yogi Berra <br />
  • There have been several watershed moments in information sharing over the last millennium or so; Gutenberg and the printing press, the invention of mass media with the radio and television, the Internet. The cellular revolution in some ways is a natural outgrowth of the media before it. Indeed, it subsumes all of them, providing books, audio, and video as a part of its current incarnation. But the future of the mobile device is so much more than just as a platform for the media of the past. It is that, but it is also the mechanism of creation for entirely new types of information. <br /> &#xA0; <br /> The Honeywell Kitchen Computer or H316 pedestal model of 1969 was a short-lived product made by Honeywell and offered by Neiman Marcus. It sold for $10,000, weighs over 100 pounds, and is used for storing recipes (but reading or entering these recipes would have been very difficult for the average cook as the only "user interface" was the binary front panel lights and switches). It had a built in cutting board and had a few recipes built in. There is no evidence that any Honeywell Kitchen Computers were ever sold. [3] <br /> The full text of the Neiman-Marcus Advertisement seems to read: <br /> "If she can only cook as well as Honeywell can compute." <br /> "Her souffles are supreme, her meal planning a challenge? She&apos;s what the Honeywell people had in mind when they devised our Kitchen Computer. She&apos;ll learn to program it with a cross-reference to her favorite recipes by N-M&apos;s own Helen Corbitt. Then by simply pushing a few buttons obtain a complete menu organized around the entree. And if she pales at reckoning her lunch tabs, she can program it to balance the family checkbook. 84A 10,600.00 complete with two week programming course. 84B Fed with Corbitt data: the original Helen Corbitt cookbook with over 1,000 recipes $100 (.75) 84C Her Potluck, 375 of our famed Zodiac restaurant&apos;s best kept secret recipes 3.95 (.75) Corbitt Epicure 84D Her Labaird Apron, one-size, ours alone by Clairdon House, multi-pastel provencial cotton 26.00 (.90) Trophy Room" <br /> &#xA0; <br /> It would cost 58,000 in today&apos;s dollars. <br /> &#xA0; <br />
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Mississippi State Emerging Technologies Summit 2010 Mississippi State Emerging Technologies Summit 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • 1 Post 2.0 Disintermediation :: Ubiquity :: Contextualization Mississippi State University Libraries Emerging Technologies Summit 09.17.2010
  • 2 Disintermediation
  • 3 The Internet Photo by Stian Eikeland - http://flic.kr/p/6CCWXH
  • 4 Remove the Middle Man Music Telecommunications Publishing Video Photo by John Linwood - http://flic.kr/p/CW3jG
  • 5 The Library Photo by Stuck in Customs - http://flic.kr/p/7AjE2e
  • 5 The Library Archive Collect Describe Equality of Access Distributed Financial Burden Instruct Inform Photo by Stuck in Customs - http://flic.kr/p/7AjE2e
  • 6 “Libraries, especially public libraries, exist in order to balance the inequality of information access due to economic or other pressures. No single average member of the public can afford to purchase all of the potential information they may want to access, and so libraries distribute that financial burden across the public as a whole, acting both as collective buyer for their community and as access point.” Photo by chotda - http://flic.kr/p/3ADVYr
  • 7 aka: Middle Man
  • 8 Last 10 Years
  • 8 Last 10 Years Ready Reference Reader’s Advisory Bibliographic Information Periodical Indexes
  • 9 What’s next?
  • 10 Ubiquity
  • 11 Broadband
  • 12 “It just isn’t evenly distributed” - Gibson
  • 13
  • 14 The Future
  • 15 Mobile
  • 16 4,100,000,000 Photo by ZeroOne - http://flic.kr/p/5729SD
  • 17 89/100
  • 18 100/100
  • 19 117/100
  • 20 151/100
  • 21 209/100
  • 22 Cell signal Photo by Dyntr - http://flic.kr/p/4kS5j5
  • 23
  • 24 4G :: WiMax :: LTE
  • 25 Cost
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28 Contextualization
  • 29 Container != Content
  • 30 personal electronics are personal Photo by Yutaka Tsutano - http://flic.kr/p/7QuJpi
  • 31 Media
  • 32 Video
  • 33 Netflix
  • 34 Netflix
  • 35 Netflix
  • 36 Netflix
  • 37 Netflix
  • 38 Netflix
  • 39 Netflix
  • 40 Netflix
  • 41 Apple TV
  • 42 Google TV
  • 43 Boxee
  • 44 hulu
  • 45 YouTube
  • 46 audio
  • 47 Mog
  • 48 Rdio
  • 49 Rhapsody
  • 50 Spotify
  • 51 print
  • 52 Magazines
  • 53 Newspapers
  • 54 Books
  • 55
  • 56 What do all of these have in common?
  • 57 Licensing > Ownership
  • 58 Breakin’ the Law
  • 59 Conclusion
  • 60 Roger’s Adoption/Innovation Curve
  • 61
  • 62 Predictions are hard...
  • 63
  • 64 Thank You.
  • 65
  • 66
  • 67 Jason Griffey Head of Library Information Technology University of TN at Chattanooga griffey@gmail.com @griffey on Twitter 423-443-4770 www.jasongriffey.net bit.ly/perpetualbeta ALA TechSource www.delicious.com/griffey
  • 68
  • 69 Questions?