Lita Forum 2009 Mobile Day Two
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Day One of my 2 day preconference for the Library Information Technology Association Forum 2009.

Day One of my 2 day preconference for the Library Information Technology Association Forum 2009.

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  • Overdrive uses DRM controlled mobi-pocket files <br /> <br /> http://cwmars.lib.overdrive.com/3B92FE9D-7D15-4056-B777-97C6B6FAF967/10/344/en/SearchResults.htm?SearchID=30344541
  • Stanza (see Figure 1.7) is an electronic book application that allows for nearly anything you want might want to do with an electronic book .(see Figure 4.8). It gives you instant access to Project Gutenberg, the home of more than 25,000 Public Domain books, free for download. It also has access to a number of other electronic bookstores, from the general purpose (Fictionwise) to the specialized (O&apos;Reilly or All Romance). These latter choices sell ebBooks, ranging in price from a couple of dollars to $12 or more. Stanza also has available a desktop application for your computer that will allow you to convert and upload existing texts, from Word files to converted PDFs, to your phone. The interface is well done, and allows for the customization of the text display, altering the colors, sizes, spacing, and other features in order to make reading from the screen as comfortable as possible. You can also bookmark positions in the books, to return to at any point. The flexibility of this application, and the access to the thousands and thousands of Project Gutenberg and Feedbooks texts make it an absolute must have download for the iPhone. The best part is that it&apos;s free.
  • There is one more ebBook reading option that should be mentioned, and that is the Google Books Mobile project (see Figure 4.121.10). Google has formatted almost 2.5 million books from their library scanning project, all of which are in the Public Domain, for mobile phones. Using the web browser on nearly any smartphone, you can search and read any of these books, making Google Books the largest electronic book library in the world. And accessing them doesn&apos;t involve any particular software, or any particular phone or operating system. We&apos;ll look at Google Books Mobile in more detail in a later section devoted to ebBooks.
  • Overdrive, again, has audiobooks
  • Overdrive, again, has audiobooks
  • Overdrive provides video in mobile sizes for download, but only in DRM&apos;d Windows Media format. This means that your mobile device has to be licensed by Microsoft to play their particular DRM, which limits you to Windows Mobile devices. There are lots of cell phones running Windows Mobile, however, and Overdrive should work with most of them. Overdrive doesn&apos;t advertise an overall title count for their video, but are adding titles regularly. Overdrive provides video content from PBS, Magnolia Pictures, Starz, and other video distributors.
  • There are libraries that circulate devices for patrons to watch videos on, where the librarians are digitizing and loading the device, and relying on the device itself to be a "locker" for the video files in order to prevent further duplication of the content. One way to do this sort of mobile circulation is a model that uses a device like a iPod Touch that the library itself owns, and movies that the library has licensed for digital distribution. Digitizing the movies into an iPod friendly format is reasonably straightforward using software such as Handbrake. Sync the films, and circulate! This assumes that the library has been able to secure the rights to digitization and limited distribution. I am not aware of any library that has successfully found a legal method of distributing
  • what other forms of library content are we ignoring? Games.
  • reference and instruction become two different things when brought into the mobile world. In real life, most librarians I know treat reference as a one-on-one instruction session, and instructions as a one-to-many reference session, more or less. When moved into the mobile realm, that&#x2019;s translated into synchronous (reference) and asynchronous (instruction)
  • reference and instruction become two different things when brought into the mobile world. In real life, most librarians I know treat reference as a one-on-one instruction session, and instructions as a one-to-many reference session, more or less. When moved into the mobile realm, that&#x2019;s translated into synchronous (reference) and asynchronous (instruction)
  • reference and instruction become two different things when brought into the mobile world. In real life, most librarians I know treat reference as a one-on-one instruction session, and instructions as a one-to-many reference session, more or less. When moved into the mobile realm, that&#x2019;s translated into synchronous (reference) and asynchronous (instruction)
  • http://libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Online_Reference#Libraries_Offering_SMS_Reference_Services
  • Most places doing SMS have two choices: buy a phone, or use a service <br /> <br /> Another option for handling reference via SMS which involves a sort of a hack with AOL Instant Messenger. AIM allows you to interact over it&apos;s network via SMS by doing the following:Send a text to 246246 with the format of "send USERNAME message"&#xA0;as an example, the AOL username for my library is utcref, so if someone wanted to send us an SMS asking what time we closed, the message would look like this:"send utcref what time do you close?"Once the conversation starts in your IM client, it can be treated as if it were a normal IM exchange. From the library standpoint, it comes in just as any other instant message would. It also doesn&apos;t matter what client you are using, either; the native AOL, Digsby, Meebo, Pidgin, or any other multi-protocol IM program. From the library, the SMS blends right in with the rest of their IM reference. Little training is required, and the librarians won&apos;t have to learn a new tool.
  • Most places doing SMS have two choices: buy a phone, or use a service <br /> <br /> Another option for handling reference via SMS which involves a sort of a hack with AOL Instant Messenger. AIM allows you to interact over it&apos;s network via SMS by doing the following:Send a text to 246246 with the format of "send USERNAME message"&#xA0;as an example, the AOL username for my library is utcref, so if someone wanted to send us an SMS asking what time we closed, the message would look like this:"send utcref what time do you close?"Once the conversation starts in your IM client, it can be treated as if it were a normal IM exchange. From the library standpoint, it comes in just as any other instant message would. It also doesn&apos;t matter what client you are using, either; the native AOL, Digsby, Meebo, Pidgin, or any other multi-protocol IM program. From the library, the SMS blends right in with the rest of their IM reference. Little training is required, and the librarians won&apos;t have to learn a new tool.
  • Most places doing SMS have two choices: buy a phone, or use a service <br /> <br /> circulate the phone among the librarians, software to recieve and send SMS messages
  • Most places doing SMS have two choices: buy a phone, or use a service <br /> <br /> Another option for handling reference via SMS which involves a sort of a hack with AOL Instant Messenger. AIM allows you to interact over it&apos;s network via SMS by doing the following:Send a text to 246246 with the format of "send USERNAME message"&#xA0;as an example, the AOL username for my library is utcref, so if someone wanted to send us an SMS asking what time we closed, the message would look like this:"send utcref what time do you close?"Once the conversation starts in your IM client, it can be treated as if it were a normal IM exchange. From the library standpoint, it comes in just as any other instant message would. It also doesn&apos;t matter what client you are using, either; the native AOL, Digsby, Meebo, Pidgin, or any other multi-protocol IM program. From the library, the SMS blends right in with the rest of their IM reference. Little training is required, and the librarians won&apos;t have to learn a new tool.
  • Another option for handling reference via SMS which involves a sort of a hack with AOL Instant Messenger. AIM allows you to interact over it&apos;s network via SMS by doing the following:Send a text to 246246 with the format of "send USERNAME message"&#xA0;as an example, the AOL username for my library is utcref, so if someone wanted to send us an SMS asking what time we closed, the message would look like this:"send utcref what time do you close?"Once the conversation starts in your IM client, it can be treated as if it were a normal IM exchange. From the library standpoint, it comes in just as any other instant message would. It also doesn&apos;t matter what client you are using, either; the native AOL, Digsby, Meebo, Pidgin, or any other multi-protocol IM program. From the library, the SMS blends right in with the rest of their IM reference. Little training is required, and the librarians won&apos;t have to learn a new tool.
  • Another option for handling reference via SMS which involves a sort of a hack with AOL Instant Messenger. AIM allows you to interact over it&apos;s network via SMS by doing the following:Send a text to 246246 with the format of "send USERNAME message"&#xA0;as an example, the AOL username for my library is utcref, so if someone wanted to send us an SMS asking what time we closed, the message would look like this:"send utcref what time do you close?"Once the conversation starts in your IM client, it can be treated as if it were a normal IM exchange. From the library standpoint, it comes in just as any other instant message would. It also doesn&apos;t matter what client you are using, either; the native AOL, Digsby, Meebo, Pidgin, or any other multi-protocol IM program. From the library, the SMS blends right in with the rest of their IM reference. Little training is required, and the librarians won&apos;t have to learn a new tool.
  • voice.google.com
  • Can use either android or google voice to consolidate your sms traffic into your IM
  • http://www.textalibrarian.com/
  • http://www.library.ohiou.edu/podcasts/?page_id=14 <br /> <br /> http://guides.lib.msu.edu/page.phtml?page_id=1010
  • Most cellular carriers have a gateway that allows email to be transmitted to a mobile phone via SMS. In order to correctly format the email address, you do need both the patron&apos;s cell number and carrier name, since the syntax changes from carrier to carrier. A full list of these addresses can be found at Wikipedia on the "List of carriers providing Email or Web to SMS" page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_carriers_providing_Email_or_Web_to_SMS). But the most common carriers in the US look like this: <br /> <br /> AT&T - number@txt.att.net <br /> <br /> Verizon - number@vtext.com <br /> <br /> Sprint - number@messaging.sprintpcs.com <br /> <br /> T-Mobile - number@tmomail.net <br /> <br /> If your ILS can send out alerts via email, you just need to give it the equivalent email for a patrons cell phone, and it should just work transparently. There is still the 160 SMS character limit for transmitting text, so if your emails tend to be very wordy, or have extraneous text (signatures and such) you may want to eliminate them before implementing SMS in your ILS. If you do send an email through one of these gateways, and exceed the 160 character limit, most will break your message across texts. A 500 character email would be 4 SMS messages sent sequentially by the gateway. The biggest issue is that often, people pay for SMS messages individually on their particular cell plan. If implementing texting in this way, you need to be very clear with your patron about how many messages they are likely to get, and ensure that they are prepared for them. Otherwise, they could be surprised by the messages they receive, and if they are paying per message, that&apos;s not a surprise you want them to have.
  • Most cellular carriers have a gateway that allows email to be transmitted to a mobile phone via SMS. In order to correctly format the email address, you do need both the patron&apos;s cell number and carrier name, since the syntax changes from carrier to carrier. A full list of these addresses can be found at Wikipedia on the "List of carriers providing Email or Web to SMS" page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_carriers_providing_Email_or_Web_to_SMS). But the most common carriers in the US look like this: <br /> <br /> AT&T - number@txt.att.net <br /> <br /> Verizon - number@vtext.com <br /> <br /> Sprint - number@messaging.sprintpcs.com <br /> <br /> T-Mobile - number@tmomail.net <br /> <br /> If your ILS can send out alerts via email, you just need to give it the equivalent email for a patrons cell phone, and it should just work transparently. There is still the 160 SMS character limit for transmitting text, so if your emails tend to be very wordy, or have extraneous text (signatures and such) you may want to eliminate them before implementing SMS in your ILS. If you do send an email through one of these gateways, and exceed the 160 character limit, most will break your message across texts. A 500 character email would be 4 SMS messages sent sequentially by the gateway. The biggest issue is that often, people pay for SMS messages individually on their particular cell plan. If implementing texting in this way, you need to be very clear with your patron about how many messages they are likely to get, and ensure that they are prepared for them. Otherwise, they could be surprised by the messages they receive, and if they are paying per message, that&apos;s not a surprise you want them to have.
  • Sirsi dynix offers pocket circ:
  • Sirsi dynix offers pocket circ: has anyone here actually ever been to an Apple Store?
  • Group discussion of local implementations and challenges10 minutes to discuss3 minutes per group to present (x6) - 18 minutes
  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • 2 Mbit/s and maximum of 14.4 Mbit/s in current 3G. LTE will bring 100Mbit/s down & 50 Mbit/s up at least, with speeds of 326.4 Mbit/s down possible. # Rogers Wireless has stated that they intend on initially launching their LTE network in Vancouver by February 2010, just in time for the Winter Olympics. [22]# AT&T Mobility has stated that they intend on upgrading to LTE as their 4G technology in 2011, but will introduce HSUPA and HSPA+ as bridge standards. [23]
  • So, let&#x2019;s talk about some library-specific issues.
  • Libraries have two areas that we&#x2019;re known for:
  • Libraries have two areas that we&#x2019;re known for:
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • Libraries traditionally have concentrated on the delivery of these. What are we missing? Games. Augmented Reality. But even these will change. How does mobile delivery of these work?
  • the US game industry is now larger than the US movie industry.
  • This is a whole new type of information delivery. It&#x2019;s been imagined for quite some time, but is only now coming to life. Layar, Enkin, Yelp.
  • University of Bath Library, United Kingdom is doing a project including QR2D codes in their OPAC. Catalogue records are proviced with these codes. When scanning the code, a map of the library is launched on user&apos;s mobiles, helping them to locate the library material in the library building. The university uses QR in their teaching and learning and even blogs on their QR code service.
  • Action at a distance
  • So, which services respond best to mobile?
  • what does geolocation potentially bring to library services?
  • http://www.micello.com/
  • What does reference look like in the future?
  • What does instruction look like in the future?
  • What does ILL look like?
  • archives of local interest? How do we keep up with continuous media creation?
  • which library services don&#x2019;t respond to mobile? Why not? When everything is decentralized, and ubiquitous...what the hell does the library look like?
  • DRM and the failure of the law to keep up with digital realities is the biggest holdup for innovation and experimentation. Copyright policies that attempt to punish innovative uses of media while desperately clinging to the 19th century ideals of the protection of ideas fail in the light of the digital revolution. Services that provide content (netlibrary, etc) are locking that content down to the point where you can&#x2019;t DO anything with it.
  • There have been several watershed moments in information sharing over the last millennium or so; Gutenberg and the printing press, the invention of mass media with the radio and television, the Internet. The cellular revolution in some ways is a natural outgrowth of the media before it. Indeed, it subsumes all of them, providing books, audio, and video as a part of its current incarnation. But the future of the mobile device is so much more than just as a platform for the media of the past. It is that, but it is also the mechanism of creation for entirely new types of information. <br /> &#xA0; <br /> The Honeywell Kitchen Computer or H316 pedestal model of 1969 was a short-lived product made by Honeywell and offered by Neiman Marcus. It sold for $10,000, weighs over 100 pounds, and is used for storing recipes (but reading or entering these recipes would have been very difficult for the average cook as the only "user interface" was the binary front panel lights and switches). It had a built in cutting board and had a few recipes built in. There is no evidence that any Honeywell Kitchen Computers were ever sold. [3] <br /> The full text of the Neiman-Marcus Advertisement seems to read: <br /> "If she can only cook as well as Honeywell can compute." <br /> "Her souffles are supreme, her meal planning a challenge? She&apos;s what the Honeywell people had in mind when they devised our Kitchen Computer. She&apos;ll learn to program it with a cross-reference to her favorite recipes by N-M&apos;s own Helen Corbitt. Then by simply pushing a few buttons obtain a complete menu organized around the entree. And if she pales at reckoning her lunch tabs, she can program it to balance the family checkbook. 84A 10,600.00 complete with two week programming course. 84B Fed with Corbitt data: the original Helen Corbitt cookbook with over 1,000 recipes $100 (.75) 84C Her Potluck, 375 of our famed Zodiac restaurant&apos;s best kept secret recipes 3.95 (.75) Corbitt Epicure 84D Her Labaird Apron, one-size, ours alone by Clairdon House, multi-pastel provencial cotton 26.00 (.90) Trophy Room" <br /> &#xA0; <br /> It would cost 58,000 in today&apos;s dollars. <br /> &#xA0;
  • Tools don&apos;t get socially interesting until they get technologically boring. - Clay Shirkey <br /> <br /> This means that while they are still technologically interesting, we had better get comfy with them. Because if we fail to do so, the resulting socially interesting period will leave us far, far behind. <br /> <br /> The current generation, the one we&apos;re living in, is the largest increase in expressive capability in human history.
  • http://bit.ly/mobile_evalhttp://bit.ly/mobile_eval
  • http://bit.ly/mobile_evalhttp://bit.ly/mobile_eval
  • http://bit.ly/mobile_evalhttp://bit.ly/mobile_eval

Lita Forum 2009 Mobile Day Two Presentation Transcript

  • 1. the future of mobile LITAForum 2009 day two
  • 2. reflections
  • 3. library content
  • 4. text
  • 5. commercial services
  • 6. public domain
  • 7. stanza
  • 8. google books mobile
  • 9. audio
  • 10. iTunes
  • 11. video
  • 12. overdrive
  • 13. licensed content
  • 14. images
  • 15. other content
  • 16. library services
  • 17. reference instruction circulation
  • 18. reference
  • 19. sms reference
  • 20. two choices
  • 21. buy a phone
  • 22. use a service
  • 23. aim hack
  • 24. txt to 246246 "send USERNAME message"
  • 25. google voice
  • 26. libraryh3lp
  • 27. text a librarian
  • 28. instruction
  • 29. tours
  • 30. circulation
  • 31. sms reminders
  • 32. AT&T - number@txt.att.net Verizon - number@vtext.com Sprint - number@messaging.sprintpcs.com T-Mobile - number@tmomail.net
  • 33. pocketcirc
  • 34. SirsiDynixPocketCirc Bringing Knowledge to Life. Mobility, the latest advance in technology, is now available to library staff who have long been confined to computer desks. SirsiDynix PocketCirc™ is a wireless circulation unit that frees library staff to serve users and perform both online and offline circulation operations – all without having to be at a desktop workstation. Serve users throughout your library SirsiDynix’s handheld circulation tools give library staff the freedom to conduct daily circulation procedures as well as large inventory projects in either an offline or wireless online environment. With a handheld PDA device in a Windows® CE environment, SirsiDynix PocketCirc combines the power of a SirsiDynix Unicorn® Library Management System with the flexibility and ease of a handheld device. With the added ability to work wireless, imagine how easily staff can move about the library and conduct the normal check-in, check-out, use-item, inventory, and patron registration tasks. Productivity on the move Achieve greater productivity for library staff. Not only are they free to move about the building, they remain “plugged in” to the SirsiDynix system wherever they are. At peak check-out times, circulation staff • Assist users when lines form at can meet customer demands for the circulation desk quick processing – saving staff • Move into stacks for on-the-spot and users significant time. assistance • Charge materials and update records • Update inventory information away from your computer Perform circulation functions online or offline • Easily check out materials from a • Integrated with your SirsiDynix Unicorn® system bookmobile • Serve users anywhere inside or outside the library • Shorten user wait times • Take advantage of community • Increase staff efficiency through mobility events to register new users on • Continue services even when offline the spot • Continue helping users when network problems or power outages occur, as you do circulation tasks in offline mode for later uploading
  • 35. break
  • 36. activity
  • 37. future
  • 38. 4G WiMax LTE
  • 39. libraries
  • 40. content services
  • 41. content
  • 42. text audio video
  • 43. games
  • 44. augmented reality
  • 45. QR codes
  • 46. RFID readers
  • 47. services
  • 48. geolocation
  • 49. wayfinding
  • 50. reference
  • 51. instruction
  • 52. interlibrary loan
  • 53. archives
  • 54. other services
  • 55. problems
  • 56. conclusion
  • 57. Tools don't get socially interesting until they get technologically boring. -- Clay Shirkey
  • 58. Thank you.
  • 59. www.delicious.com/griffey/mobilebook http://bit.ly/mobile_eval speakerrate.com/griffey
  • 60. Jason Griffey Email: griffey@gmail.com Site: jasongriffey.net gVoice: 423-443-4770 Twitter: @griffey Book: Library Blogging Other: LITABlog, TechSource Head of Library Information Technology University of Tennessee at Chattanooga www.delicious.com/griffey/mobilebook http://bit.ly/mobile_eval speakerrate.com/griffey