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Most Dangerous Game
 

Most Dangerous Game

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    Most Dangerous Game Most Dangerous Game Presentation Transcript

    • “The Most Dangerous Game” Test Review Here’s What you Can Expect -Plot Questions -Literary Terms Questions -MDG Vocabulary
    • 1. 2. 3. 4. Antagonist Literary Terms Protagonist 12. Suspense Conflict Plot--Rising action 13. Symbolism & Falling action 14. Point of View 5. Climax 15. Imagery; Figurative 6. Denouement Language 7. Exposition 8. Foreshadowing • There will be at least 10 questions on the test about 9. Irony these terms. 10. Setting • Sometimes the same 11. Theme passage maybe used for different questions.
    • Literary Terms (a) "We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting." This passage is part of the (b) "The best sport in the world," agreed Rainsford. ______. (c) "For the hunter," amended Whitney. "Not for the jaguar." A. setting (d) "Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. "You're a B. Rising big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares action how a jaguar feels?" C. Climax (e) "Perhaps the jaguar does," observed Whitney. D. Falling (f)“ Bah! They've no understanding." action (g)“ Even so, I rather think they understand one thing--fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death." (h) "Nonsense," laughed Rainsford. "This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes--the hunters and the hunted. Luckily, you and I are hunters.
    • Protagonist— Sanger Rainsford
    • Main Antagonist: General Zaroff Other Antagonists— The Caribbean Sea Ivan The Jungle Fear The dogs
    • A conflict is a struggle between two people, between a person  and nature, or between two different sides of the same person.  Use this chart to explain each different type of conflict in the  story. The sea,  the dogs,  the jungle, the quicksand General  Zaroff,  Whitney,  Ivan Terror-- “I  must keep my  nerve. I must  keep my  nerve,” he  said through  tight teeth.
    • Main Conflict— Man v. man
    • Climaxes • Rainsford refuses to hunt with Zaroff and becomes the hunted. • Rainsford hides in the tree. • Rainsford makes the Malay Man Trap. • Rainsford builds the Burmese tiger pit. • Rainsford is cornered and leaps from the cliff. • **Rainsford confronts Zaroff. Twenty feet below him the sea rumbled and hissed. Rainsford hesitated. He heard the hounds. Then he leaped far out into the sea….
    • Denouement “He had never slept in a better bed, Rainsford decided.”
    • Exposition • • • • • The myth of Ship Trap Island Rainsford’s hunting background Zaroff’s hunting background Ivan’s background--Cossack The rules of the game
    • Foreshadowing • “We were drawing near the island then. What I felt was a—a mental chill; a sort of sudden dread.” • “Somewhere, off in the blackness, someone had fired a gun three times.” • “I’ve read your book about hunting snow leopards in Tibet, you see,” explained the man. “I am General Zaroff.” • “That Cape buffalo …was a monster...Hurled me against a tree,” said the general. “Fractured my skull. But I got the brute.” • I drink to a foeman worthy of my steel—at last.”
    • Literary Terms Which of the sentences is an example of foreshadowing? A B C D E F G H (a) "We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting." (b) "The best sport in the world," agreed Rainsford. (c) "For the hunter," amended Whitney. "Not for the jaguar." (d) "Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. "You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?" (e) "Perhaps the jaguar does," observed Whitney. (f)“ Bah! They've no understanding." (g)“ Even so, I rather think they understand one thing-fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death." (h) "Nonsense," laughed Rainsford. "This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes--the hunters and the hunted. Luckily, you and I are hunters.
    • Point of view • Third person, author limited to Rainsford: • “Rainsford did not want to believe what his reason told him was true, but the truth was as evident as the sun that had by now pushed through the morning mists. The general was playing with him! The general was saving him for another day’s sport!”
    • Setting • The yacht in the Caribbean • Zaroff’s palatial mansion on Ship Trap Island • Death Swamp
    • Symbolism • • • • • • • • • • General Zaroff Ivan Game Death Swamp Ivan Cossack Sanger Rainsford Whitney Lazarus Marcus Aurelius, Madama Butterfly, Chablis, filet mignon… http://prezi.com/ehr7vbuevpqj/most-dangerous-game/
    • “And now,” said the general, “I want to show you my new collection of heads. Will you come with me to the library?”
    • Suspense Suspense is the curiosity and excitement you feel  when you are reading or watching a movie and  you wonder what will happen next. Writers often  create suspense by putting characters in  dangerous situations. For example, the following  passage from “The Most Dangerous Game”  makes you wonder what will happen next. “For a seemingly endless time he fought the sea. He  began to count his strokes; he could do possibly a  hundred more and then—”
    • Theme • • • • “Thou Shalt not Kill.” What is the most dangerous game? “I’m a hunter, not a murderer.” We try to be civilized here.”
    • Literary Terms:  Figurative Language Imagery         Personification      Simile  Metaphor 1. "Nor four yards," remarked Rainsford, “Ugh, it’s like moist black velvet.”  2. "There was no breeze. The sea was as flat as a plate-glass window.“ 3. “…giant rocks with razor edges crouch like a sea monster with  wide-open jaws”  4. “An apprehensive night crawled slowly by like a wounded snake”  5. The Cossack was the cat; he was the mouse.
    • “The Most Dangerous Game” Key Vocabulary Words 1. Condone – to forgive or overlook 2. Cultivated – refine or cultured manner 3. Quarry – the object of a hunt 4. Scruple – a feeling of uneasiness that keeps  a person from doing something 5. Solicitously-in a manner of expressing  concern 6. Tangible- capable of being touched or felt 7. Zealous- intensely enthusiastic