3D history

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/ittybittiesforyou/4661894210/
  • Stereoscope slides consist of two pictures mounted next to each other. Each image is taken at a slightly different angle to correspond with the distance between the viewer’s eyes. When viewed through a stereoscope, the two images merge and give the illusion of 3D.
  • Anaglyph 3D glasses are those old-school red/green, red/blue glasses that you probably wore as a kid or have seen in old films. Anaglyph 3D images are projected in the same color as the lenses on the glasses. Each eye sees a different perspective, so that the resultant combination creates a 3D effect.
  • Polarized 3D films are the ones that most viewers experience today. Polarized imaging creates a 3d effect by projecting two images, each filmed from a different rotational point. The glasses allow the eyes to combine the two images and simulate a real 3D experience.
  • http://techpp.com/2011/09/02/3d-technology-without-glasses-how-does-it-work/ (image url)
  • 3D history

    1. 1. Do you know your 3D history?
    2. 2. 3D through the ages… <ul><li>Just how old is 3D imaging? </li></ul><ul><li>How are 3D images captured? </li></ul><ul><li>How has 3D technology changed? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Stereoscopy Stereoscopes (also known as stereopticons or stereo viewers) were a popular form of entertainment during the 1800s. Stereoscopes are one of the earliest forms of 3D imaging technology . These viewers allowed users to perceive a still image in “3D” by creating an optical illusion. Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrskovgaard/2730987065/
    4. 4. Looking through a picture window Image credit: http://digital.nypl.org/dennis/stereoviews/index.html
    5. 5. Seeing in 3D <ul><li>Anaglyph </li></ul><ul><li>Polarized </li></ul>Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rivalee/3234174656/ Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/forresto/53484425/
    6. 6. Anaglyph Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/elbragon/4597068522/in/photostream/
    7. 7. Polarized http://www.flickr.com/photos/best2buygames/5113176533/ http://www.empiremovies.com/2009/12/09/avatars-imax-3d-poster/
    8. 8. Filming in 3D <ul><li>So how are 3D films recorded? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To create the illusion of 3D, a film has to be shot from two precise angles. Two cameras are mounted together on a rig to film a 3d scene. </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. References Sniderman, Z. (2011, February 7). How does 3D technology work? Retrieved from http://mashable.com/2011/02/07/how-does-3d-work/ Stereoscope . (n.d.). Retrieved from http://courses.ncssm.edu/gallery/collections/toys/html/exhibit01.htm

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