Content Strategy: It's Not All Greek

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An introduction to content strategy and why it's essential for any web project.

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  • In fact, they’re doing it with alarming rate, almost everywhere they are. Reading, watching videos, and looking at imagery.
  • In fact, they’re doing it with alarming rate, almost everywhere they are. Reading, watching videos, and looking at imagery.
  • In fact, they’re doing it with alarming rate, almost everywhere they are. Reading, watching videos, and looking at imagery.
  • In fact, they’re doing it with alarming rate, almost everywhere they are. Reading, watching videos, and looking at imagery.
  • In fact, they’re doing it with alarming rate, almost everywhere they are. Reading, watching videos, and looking at imagery.
  • Smart companies are already doing it, and the rest are catching on quickly. Users are already expecting valuable and fresh content.
  • - interface planning provides a permanent home for strategic content.
  • Shoehorning content into a website this way often undoes all the careful thought and planning that went into the rest of the project. Real, thought-out and meaningful content on a site creates a good user experience. It’s best when it’s concise, purposeful and directed toward a specific audience. And that takes planning. From Pepi Ronalds’ A List Apart article.
  • CDS results in web content clown cars. Only not as fun.
  • Bolt on syndrome is certainly not just a problem for content strategists, but for anyone involved in the planning process. Insisting on a sound content strategy upfront can mitigate some bolt on problems.
  • Heidi Montag is a great example of bolt-on content going wrong.
  • This site has clearly repurposed brochure copy, not a bad visual design. This window blinds site is built on wordpress - and as a result of the functionality restrictions, it’s shoehorning in ecommerce and editorial content.
  • This site has clearly repurposed brochure copy, not a bad visual design. This window blinds site is built on wordpress - and as a result of the functionality restrictions, it’s shoehorning in ecommerce and editorial content.
  • Client: help them to think through the implications of what they’re building. Helps understanding of the scope. Project team: shared understanding: why are we doing this? Brand: increases trust and positive impressions Marketers: halo effect of SEO, return visits End users: they benefit from targeted, thoughtful and fresh content. Their lives are made a little easier. Sanity
  • No one-size fits all Sitemaps - high level sitewide strategy Wireframe callouts - for interface-level strategy. Independent CS docs - for large or complex properties, editorial calendars, etc. Part of a Content distribution plan for social media
  • No one-size fits all Sitemaps - high level sitewide strategy Wireframe callouts - for interface-level strategy. Independent CS docs - for large or complex properties, editorial calendars, etc. Part of a Content distribution plan for social media
  • No one-size fits all Sitemaps - high level sitewide strategy Wireframe callouts - for interface-level strategy. Independent CS docs - for large or complex properties, editorial calendars, etc. Part of a Content distribution plan for social media
  • No one-size fits all Sitemaps - high level sitewide strategy Wireframe callouts - for interface-level strategy. Independent CS docs - for large or complex properties, editorial calendars, etc. Part of a Content distribution plan for social media
  • Change.org began as a online community that enabled people to network and organize around social causes. The purpose of the website is to have users donate money and get involved. Their site would not even be possible today without strategy and planning. On the site and thru distribution channels.
  • Change.org began as a online community that enabled people to network and organize around social causes. The purpose of the website is to have users donate money and get involved. Their site would not even be possible today without strategy and planning. On the site and thru distribution channels.
  • 1,388% increase in engagement over a year. Source: http://www.maxgladwell.com/2008/12/changeorgs-content-strategy-success/
  • 1,388% increase in engagement over a year. Source: http://www.maxgladwell.com/2008/12/changeorgs-content-strategy-success/
  • Content Strategy: It's Not All Greek

    1. 1. Content Strategy: It’s not all Greek.
    2. 2. Remember the interactive olden days?
    3. 3. Remember the interactive olden days?
    4. 4. Remember the interactive olden days?
    5. 5. Remember the interactive olden days?
    6. 6. Remember the interactive olden days?
    7. 7. And what we were designing?
    8. 8. And what we were designing?
    9. 9. And what we were designing?
    10. 10. And what we were designing?
    11. 11. And what we were designing?
    12. 12. Soon, we realized something: People can read. And they want to read all the time, especially online.
    13. 18. We must meet this demand for information with great content strategy, or we may as well set up shop in Second Life.
    14. 19. And Nobody’s In Second Life. (apologies to any Second Lifers)
    15. 20. Content Strategy: Organizing and planning communication to meet specific objectives. <ul><li>Brand and business objectives </li></ul><ul><li>User desires and needs </li></ul><ul><li>Sales and marketing objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Technology and other objectives </li></ul>
    16. 21. Content Strategy is a differentiator. But not for long. Just like that “fad” usability, CS is not an added value – it’s a requirement.
    17. 22. Content Strategy is absolutely essential for: <ul><li>Interface planning </li></ul><ul><li>Social media plans </li></ul><ul><li>Blogging plans </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing website management </li></ul>
    18. 23. Content Delay Syndrome: When you push copywriting, imagery and video to the very end of a project as executables rather than strategically planned interface elements.
    19. 24. Content Delay Syndrome:
    20. 25. Website Bolt-On Syndrome: When websites are hastily developed before thoughtful planning can occur, rendering future content and functionality homeless. Also happens when websites are developed from the “bottom up.”
    21. 27. The effects of CDS and WBOS:
    22. 28. The effects of CDS and WBOS:
    23. 29. Cure for a variety of web ills! Your content strategy should include, at the least: <ul><li>Specific content identified to address business, user and development needs </li></ul><ul><li>Meta data/SEO keywords </li></ul><ul><li>Content channel distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing editorial plan </li></ul>
    24. 30. CS is also good for your: <ul><li>Client </li></ul><ul><li>Project team </li></ul><ul><li>Brand </li></ul><ul><li>Marketers </li></ul><ul><li>End users </li></ul><ul><li>Sanity </li></ul>
    25. 31. What a CS looks like
    26. 32. What a CS looks like
    27. 33. What a CS looks like
    28. 34. What a CS looks like
    29. 35. What a CS looks like in action
    30. 36. What a CS looks like in action
    31. 37. Results: <ul><li>Increased engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Better experience </li></ul><ul><li>Increased traffic (possibly due to change.gov) </li></ul>
    32. 38. Results: <ul><li>Increased engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Better experience </li></ul><ul><li>Increased traffic (possibly due to change.gov) </li></ul>
    33. 39. To sum it up: Great user experiences take careful cross-functional planning – don’t let half-assed content tear down the rest of your project. Make great content a priority, and you’ll create something that actually matters.
    34. 40. Discussion
    35. 41. Thank You. Gretchen Thomas [email_address] http://www.linkedin.com/in/gretchenthomas414

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