Integrating ICT in TVET for
Effective Technology Enabled
Learning
Greig Krull
3rd FET & Partnerships Conference
Kempton Pa...
Agenda
Context – Drivers and Constraints
Key Trends and Challenges
TVET Technology Integration
Modes of Educational Provis...
Context
1. What is your biggest motivator to integrate
technology into your teaching and learning?
2. What is your biggest...
Motivators
Constraints
Bates & Sangra (2011)
Goals for
ICT
Integration
Increase
flexible
access for
students Increase
personal
interaction
betwee...
Trends and Challenges
Global Trends and Challenges
The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
Growing Usage of Social Media
Integrati...
The College System in SA
Expand enrolments & campus space
Improve quality of education
Increase Foundation & NQF Level 5 P...
Integration of Technology in
Technical & Vocational
Education and Training (TVET)
Technology Integration in TVET
Communication
Comm Tools, Social Networking
Teaching/Learning
VLEs, eContent, eAssessment,
...
How do we use technology?
Efficient way to
transmit content
Access a wider
range of resources
Facilitate 2-way
communicati...
Educational
Technology Stack
Adapted from Marquard, 2013
Implications for Educational
Modes of Provision
Continuum of Educational Provision
Face to face (F2F) Mixed Mode Distance Education
On Campus Off campus
Spatial / Geograp...
Delivery using Technology
No digital support Digitally Supported Internet-supported Internet-dependent Fully online
Offlin...
A
D
C
B
Fully Offline
Internet Supported
Internet Dependent
Fully Online
Campus-based Hybrid / Blended Remote
E
Digitally ...
Technology Outlook
Technology Outlook
Technologies & Strategies
The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
Digital Publishing
Mobile Phones
Tablets
C...
Top 20 Tools for Learning in 2013
© 2013 Centre for
Learning & Performance
Technologies
Open Education Movement
Open Source movement -> cost effective tools
– Learner Management Systems
(Moodle, Sakai, Canvas)
...
Open Educational Resources
“OER are teaching or learning resources that have been
released under an intellectual property ...
Principles for Success
ICT Infra-
structure &
applications
Connectivity /
Internet
Access
Programme,
Course &
Materials
Develop(Open)
Licencing o...
Policy Level Issues
• Students able to have own devices
• Computer Laboratories
• Applications (including Open Source)
• I...
Policy Level Issues
• ICT as core component of teaching & learning (blended)
• Use of OER to support materials development...
Policy Level Issues
• Meet quality standards
• Monitoring and evaluation
5. Quality Assurance & Evaluation
• Professional ...
Supporting Principles
Adaptive to
Change
Build
Capacity
Open
Education
Collaboration
Look to Add
Value
A Final Thought
Good teaching may overcome a poor
choice of technology but technology will
never save bad teaching
Tony Ba...
Thank you
greigk@saide.org.za
greigk_za
Greig Krull
Discussion
www.slideshare.net/greigk
This work is licensed under a
Cre...
References
• Bates, T (2012) http://www.tonybates.ca/
• Bates, T and Sangra, A (2011) Managing Technology in Higher Educat...
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Integrating ICT in TVET for Effective Technology Enabled Learning

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Integrating ICT in TVET for Effective Technology Enabled Learning Presentation at the ICT and FET Partnership Conference, Emperors Palace, Johannesburg, 18-19 March 2013.

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  • Enablement of technology: improve learning motivation, improve quality, introduce new methods of learning, increase access to resources, improve understanding in how to use technology
  • Develop 21st century skills - Independent learning, collaboration, teamwork, networking & adaptabilityGreater cost-effectiveness (more students at higher quality and less cost)
  • New Media Consortium (NMC) – international community of educational technology experts – research looks at impact of educational technology globally in next 5 yearsSocial media – students and staff use social media to share & find information & developments, possibilities for learning communitiesIntegration – best of both f2f and network, more universities turning to itFluency – no staff training on digital literacyAccess – drive to increase numbers – need academic background to be successfulRelevant – rethink the value, other business models
  • 2013 = 650 000 students, 2015 = 1 million, 2030 = 2.5 millionIncreasing number of matrics seeking opportunities And matrics who need additional instruction in Maths and Science before going onto college or university programmes RPL will be applied more widely
  • Teaching - Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) - Content dissemination and student support, Online AssessmentComms - Growing interest in the social networking in education working sites, wikis, communication tools and folksonomiesAdmin - systems for: admission and records, examination and transcripts, finance and management information systems
  • The mode of education provision is typically viewed on a continuum from purely face-to-face tuition through to education purely at a distance, the latter traditionally conceptualised as correspondence tuition with no face-to-face interaction between teachers and learners. However, there is now more resource-based (independent) learning in f2f programmes, more f2f interaction in distance. Prediction that, especially with growing use of educational technology there will be rapid movement to the centre. From purely face-to-face (contact) tuition through to education solely at a distance
  • An expanded definition of e-learning includes the use of all digital resources, systems, devices/computers, and electronic communication in the support of education. e.g. a course may supported digitally by the use of CDs, but it is not necessarily an online course.A second continuum could represent another dimension by plotting the extent of supporting ICTs – ranging from fully offline to fully online. Note the inclusion of ‘digitally supported’ in the ICT dimension. Furthermore, the commonly used terms of ‘web-supported’ and ‘web dependent’ are deemed to be too specific and have given way to ‘Internet-Supported’ and Internet-Dependent’. In internet-supported programmes, participation online is an option or alternative for learners. In internet-dependent programmes, participation via the internet is a requirement, and could include online interaction, communication and access to course materials via the web. In fully online programmes, there is no physical face-to-face component, although there could be a virtual face-to-face component. In our African context, it is pertinent to also consider digital forms of support that do not require internet access. The digital forms of support for learning could be offline via a CD/DVD, and a further detail could be expressed by clarifying exactly which elements of the ICT dimension may be on- or offline. Of course, within a particular course, learning could be supported both online and digitally offline at various stages.The continued evolution of e-learning is contributing to the blurring of the distinction between face-to-face and distance education provision. It is useful to conceptualise the two continua in relation to each other as horizontal and vertical axes.
  • Rather than view these two continua separately, it is useful to conceptualise them in relation to each other as horizontal and vertical axes. Situating various courses or programmes on the resulting grid allows one to describe both the extent of spatial or geographic distribution and the ICT supported dimensions of a course or programme. The circles positioned on the grid represent examples based on courses or programmes at actual higher education institutions. This would enable for an HEI to position a particular course or programme (such as B) on the grid in terms of where they are situated right now, and then determine where the institution would like them to move to over a period of time. This could assist in identifying what changes would be required in order to move or reposition the course in terms of this grid, and the other influencing factors or aspects of the course would need to be taken into account.
  • Technology is DisruptiveFalling costs are making devices affordable
  • Note:Number of web appsNumber of “non-educational” appsNumber of Social networking toolsWhat are your most useful tools…?
  • Role of ICTs in improving quality, widening access and cutting costs in the teaching functionTechnology must be seen as a supportive toolThe use of technology needs to add valueCategories ICT Infrastructure and ApplicationsConnectivity/Internet AccessProgramme, Course, and Materials Development and DeliveryPublic Service and External CollaborationLicensing of e-Learning MaterialsCapacity BuildingQuality Assurance, Monitoring, and EvaluationChange Management
  • Preserve the integrity of the teaching and learning process and environment by:using ICT to support (not drive) teaching and learning Employ flexibility to ensure the ICT support is appropriate for:the topic, level of study, student contextand the expertise of the lecturer / tutors / studentsThe way in which we use digital technology models particular values for our students and places particular kinds of demands both on them and on their teachers. Therefore, we need to make conscious choices to use suitable technologies in appropriate ways taking cognizance of both our learning purposes and the technology profile of our target learners and staff.
  • Integrating ICT in TVET for Effective Technology Enabled Learning

    1. 1. Integrating ICT in TVET for Effective Technology Enabled Learning Greig Krull 3rd FET & Partnerships Conference Kempton Park 18th March 2014
    2. 2. Agenda Context – Drivers and Constraints Key Trends and Challenges TVET Technology Integration Modes of Educational Provision Technology Outlook Principles for Success Discussion
    3. 3. Context 1. What is your biggest motivator to integrate technology into your teaching and learning? 2. What is your biggest constraint to integrate technology into your teaching and learning?
    4. 4. Motivators
    5. 5. Constraints
    6. 6. Bates & Sangra (2011) Goals for ICT Integration Increase flexible access for students Increase personal interaction between students and staff Develop student skills to identify, collect, analyse and apply knowledge Teach how ICT can be used in a profession or subject Develop 21st century skills Greater cost- effectiveness
    7. 7. Trends and Challenges
    8. 8. Global Trends and Challenges The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition Growing Usage of Social Media Integration of Online, Blended & Collaborative Learning Expanding Access Low Digital Fluency of Staff Keeping Education Relevant
    9. 9. The College System in SA Expand enrolments & campus space Improve quality of education Increase Foundation & NQF Level 5 Programmes Reduce mix of qualifications & uneven quality assurance Build partnerships with communities & employers DHET. (2014) White Paper for Post-School Education and Training
    10. 10. Integration of Technology in Technical & Vocational Education and Training (TVET)
    11. 11. Technology Integration in TVET Communication Comm Tools, Social Networking Teaching/Learning VLEs, eContent, eAssessment, Support Administration Records, Finance, Management
    12. 12. How do we use technology? Efficient way to transmit content Access a wider range of resources Facilitate 2-way communication Shift from content provision/testing To exploration, co- creation & interaction
    13. 13. Educational Technology Stack Adapted from Marquard, 2013
    14. 14. Implications for Educational Modes of Provision
    15. 15. Continuum of Educational Provision Face to face (F2F) Mixed Mode Distance Education On Campus Off campus Spatial / Geographic distribution of teachers and learners
    16. 16. Delivery using Technology No digital support Digitally Supported Internet-supported Internet-dependent Fully online Offline Online Extent of ICT support
    17. 17. A D C B Fully Offline Internet Supported Internet Dependent Fully Online Campus-based Hybrid / Blended Remote E Digitally Supported Mode of Delivery B
    18. 18. Technology Outlook
    19. 19. Technology Outlook
    20. 20. Technologies & Strategies The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition Digital Publishing Mobile Phones Tablets Cloud Computing Social Media Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Flipped Classrooms Gamification Digital Identity
    21. 21. Top 20 Tools for Learning in 2013 © 2013 Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies
    22. 22. Open Education Movement Open Source movement -> cost effective tools – Learner Management Systems (Moodle, Sakai, Canvas) – Student Information Systems (Fedena, Kuali, Open SIS) Open Education movement -> free quality content – Open Educational Resources (OER) – Open Courseware – Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
    23. 23. Open Educational Resources “OER are teaching or learning resources that have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others. OER include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software” (adapted from: Atkins)
    24. 24. Principles for Success
    25. 25. ICT Infra- structure & applications Connectivity / Internet Access Programme, Course & Materials Develop(Open) Licencing of Materials/ Resources Capacity Building Quality Assurance Change Manage- ment Areas to address In alignment with: Vision / Mission Strategic Plan Other Policies
    26. 26. Policy Level Issues • Students able to have own devices • Computer Laboratories • Applications (including Open Source) • Infrastructure Maintenance (equipment, backups etc) • Link to ICT policy 1. ICT Infrastructure & Applications • Sufficient bandwidth • Stable network • Wired and wireless access throughout campuses 2. Connectivity & Internet Access
    27. 27. Policy Level Issues • ICT as core component of teaching & learning (blended) • Use of OER to support materials development • Ongoing quality improvement • Staff recognition (financial, promotion, other, etc) 3. Programme, Course & Materials Design • Copyright and Creative Commons licenses • Encourage use of OER 4. (Open) Licensing & Intellectual Property
    28. 28. Policy Level Issues • Meet quality standards • Monitoring and evaluation 5. Quality Assurance & Evaluation • Professional development for academic and admin staff • Use of education technology in teaching & learning 6. Capacity Building • Advocacy of ICT integration • Institutional events & circulating materials 7. Change Management
    29. 29. Supporting Principles Adaptive to Change Build Capacity Open Education Collaboration Look to Add Value
    30. 30. A Final Thought Good teaching may overcome a poor choice of technology but technology will never save bad teaching Tony Bates (2012)
    31. 31. Thank you greigk@saide.org.za greigk_za Greig Krull Discussion www.slideshare.net/greigk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. www.saide.org.za
    32. 32. References • Bates, T (2012) http://www.tonybates.ca/ • Bates, T and Sangra, A (2011) Managing Technology in Higher Education: Strategies for Transforming Teaching and Learning. John Wiley & Sons. • Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (2013) Top 100 Tools for Learning 2013 • DHET. (2014) White Paper for Post-School Education and Training. • Isaacs, S and Hollow, D, (eds) (2013) The eLearning Africa 2013 Report, ICWE: Germany. • Johnson, L, Adams Becker, S, Estrada, V & Freeman, A (2014). NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. • Marquard, S (2013). Educational Technology Stack. • Saide (2013) Considering Mode of Delivery in Education

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