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Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
Margins group 2 part 2
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Margins group 2 part 2

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Group presentation for The Global City, Northwestern University, MPPA program, Summer 2011. …

Group presentation for The Global City, Northwestern University, MPPA program, Summer 2011.

Part 2 of 3. Parts 1 and 3 in a separate file.

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • 1. POLITICAL REPRESENTATION IN THE FORMER BRITISH EMPIRE<br />Though almost a solid two centuries apart, both the United States and India are former British colonies. <br />Struggles based upon the universal rights of man– including political representation. <br />But how has the realities of both Indian and American independence movements lived up to the ideals espoused by their respective independence leaders?<br />
  • 2. Homelessness as a barrier to political representation<br />Homelessness is probably the largest barrier to political representation in the modern world. <br />While the homeless technically have a right to vote, often it is is challenging if not downright impossible to register to vote without a permanent address. <br />DETROIT<br />MUMABI<br />WASHINGTON<br />
  • 3. Unique problems – Mumbai - apathy<br />Mumbai has high levels of political apathy compared to most other Indian cities. <br />Voter turnout in Mumbai is habitually lower than other major cities in the nation. <br />
  • 4. Unique problems – Detroit – Corruption and state intervention<br />Detroit has serious problems with political corruption, even compared to other major cities. <br />Furthermore, Detroit is situated in a significantly more conservative state, and often times the Michigan state government exerts supremacy over the city’s wishes. <br />
  • 5. UNIQUE REPRESENTATION PROBLEMS IN WASHINGTON, DC<br />Washington, DC is home to arguably the most powerful government in the free world. <br />But in that seat of power, there are major discrepancies in political representation. <br />
  • 6. DISPARITY IN WASHINGTON’S POLITICAL REPRESENTATION<br />But some DC residents have more political rights than others…<br />Many of DC’s professional class work in and for the federal government, giving them the ear of people in power. <br />Conversely, much of DC’s poor and marginalized are eons, not miles away from decision makers. <br />
  • 7. Political Marginalization -- Conclusions<br />All three cities have problems with political marginalization on class lines. <br />But each city comes with some of their own problems:<br />Mumbai, even in the wake of a massive terrorist attack, cannot get it’s citizens to vote. <br />Detroit has serious corruption and home rule disputes with it’s state government. <br />Washington, DC is, in the view of the Organization of American states, effectively disenfranchised in blatant violation of the United States' commitment to the fundamental rights of man. <br />
  • 8. RETURN TO PART 3<br />

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