1 themes-paris

653 views

Published on

from The Global City, Northwestern University, Summer 2011, graduate public policy course

Published in: News & Politics, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
653
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

1 themes-paris

  1. 1. Themes/Paris<br />MPPA-DL 452<br />Spring 2011<br />Session 1<br />
  2. 2. Course Themes<br /><ul><li>Dynamics: Globalization, Urbanization
  3. 3. Circuits: Transnationals, Diasporas
  4. 4. Centers: Agglomeration & Sprawl
  5. 5. Margins: New Inequalities
  6. 6. Ecologies: Sustainability
  7. 7. Architectures: A Sense of Place
  8. 8. Crises: Globalization in Reverse
  9. 9. Frontiers: Looking Ahead</li></li></ul><li>
  10. 10. Since 2007, more people now live in urban areas than in rural areas worldwide<br />Source: United Nations, World Urbanization Prospects<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Paris<br />
  14. 14. “Cities are highly complex systems of advantage, which shifting alliances try to shape to their advantage by building and using them in often competing ways.”<br />Jeb Brugmann, Welcome to the Urban Revolution, Ch. 6, p. 103 (2009)<br />
  15. 15. “…the dominant narrative about economic globalization is a narrative of eviction because its key concepts – globalization, information economy, and telematics – all suggest that place no longer matters. And they suggest that the type of place represented by major cities may have become obsolete from the perspective of the economy... <br />“It is an account that privileges the capability for global transmission over the concentrations of built infrastructure that makes transmission possible, that privileges information outputs over the work of producing those outputs, from specialists to secretaries, and the new transnational corporate culture over the multiplicity of cultural environments, including reterritorialized immigrant cultures, within which many of the ‘other’ jobs of the global information economy take place.<br />“The overall effect is to lose the place-boundednessof significant components of the global information economy.”<br />SaskiaSassen, “Analytic Borderlands: Economy and Culture in the Global City” (2002)<br />
  16. 16. “As in 1860s Paris under the fanatical reign of Baron Haussmann, urban redevelopment still strives to simultaneously maximize private profit and social control…<br />“Urban segregation is not a frozen status quo, but rather a ceaseless social war in which the state intervenes regularly in the name of “progress,” “beautification,” and even “social justice for the poor” to redraw spatial boundaries to the advantage of landowners, foreign investors, elite homeowners, and middle-class commuters…<br />“The most intense class conflicts over urban space, of course, take place in downtowns and major urban nodes…where globalized property values collide with the desperate need of the poor to be near central sources of income.”<br />Mike Davis, Planet of Slums (2006)<br />
  17. 17. Haussmann plan (1850-1870)<br />
  18. 18. Haussmann plan (1850-1870)<br />
  19. 19. Boulevard system required major slum clearance<br />
  20. 20. Other more recent evictions<br />1950, Hong Kong – 107,000<br />1965-74, Rio de Janeiro – 139,000<br />1972-76, Dakar – 90,000<br />1976, Mumbai – 70,000<br />1986-92, Santo Domingo – 180,000<br />1988, Seoul – 800,000<br />1990, Lagos – 300,000<br />1990, Nairobi – 40,000<br />1995-96, Rangoon – 1,000,000<br />1995, Beijing – 100,000<br />2001-03, Jakarta – 500,000<br />2005, Harare – 750,000+<br />Source: Mike Davis, Planet of Slums(2006)<br />
  21. 21. A basic model of urbaneconomic development<br />agricultural  industrial  commercial  information<br />(evolutionary and cumulative)<br />
  22. 22. agricultural<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. industrial<br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26. commercial<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28. information<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Global public policy problems: epidemics/pandemics<br />
  31. 31.
  32. 32.
  33. 33. Global public policy problems: aging population<br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35.
  36. 36. Global public policy problems: terrorism<br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38.
  39. 39. Global public policy problems: climate change<br />
  40. 40.
  41. 41.
  42. 42. Global public policy problems: inequality and poverty<br />
  43. 43. Gini Coefficient – Measure of Income Inequality (2007)<br />
  44. 44. Percentage population living on less than $1 per day, 2007<br />
  45. 45. MPPA DL-452: Grading<br />A total of 1,000 points may be awarded in this course. Grades are awarded according to the following breakdown: 900-1000 = A; 800-899 = B; 650-799 = C; 0-649 = F. <br />
  46. 46. MPPA DL-452: Case studies<br />

×