• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Salvadorean in America
 

Salvadorean in America

on

  • 413 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
413
Views on SlideShare
413
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    My name is Blessing
    i am a young lady with a kind and open heart,
    I enjoy my life,but life can't be complete if you don't have a person to share it
    with. blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    Hoping To Hear From You
    Yours Blessing
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n

Salvadorean in America Salvadorean in America Presentation Transcript

  • El Salvador Central America Cultural Presentation
  • State Proportion of the Salvadoran-Born Population in the United States And Metropolitan Areas with 25,000 Salvadoran Born or More Boston ! ( New York San Francisco ! ( ! ( ! ( Washington, DC Riverside State Share of the Los Angeles !! (( 1,095,000 Salvadoran Born** Dallas Less than 1% ! ( 1.0% to 4.0% 4.1% to 8.4% Houston ! ( 14.9%Hawaii Miami 36.5% ! ( **No state accounted Number of Salvadoran Born for the following shares: in a Metropolitan Area* 8.5% to 14.8% and Alaska 15.0% to 36.4% ! ( 25,000 to 100,000Source: 2008 American Community Survey. ! 100,001 to 135,000 ( ! ( More than 270,000© 2009 Migration Policy Institute. *Refers to Metropolitan Statistical Area
  • Ten Source Countries with the Largest Populations in the United States as Percentages of the Total Foreign-Born Population: 2009 All other countries 43%Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2009 American Community Survey
  • “For the Spanish speaking residence the category Race didn’t make sense in either language. When I pointed tothe racial choices they looked at me incredulously without any understanding. Nothing in their day to dayexperience suggested they were White. No one gave them White Privilege. How could they be forced to checkWhite on a form? But, I soothed them with the option to make better choices about their Latino origin. NoPuerto Rican wants to be lumped with Mexicans. And the Guatemalans and Salvadorans were glad that I couldwrite that in the box for another, Latino or Spanish origin.” 2010 Census Worker
  • Salvadoran Immigrants in the United States
  • Salvadoran Immigrants in the United States• 1.1 million foreign born residing in U.S. 2008• Over one-quarter arrived in 2000 or later• Between 2000 and 2008, Salvadoran immigrantpopulation grew by more than 10,000 in 10 states• Nevada by 11,274
  • Salvadoran Immigrant English & High School Education in United States
  • Salvadoran Immigrant English & High School Education in United States• 71.7% speak English less than “very well”• 24.1% speak English “very well”• 54.4% have no high school diploma or GED, 2008• 5.2% Latino dropout rate in Nevada, 2009-2010
  • from Innocent Voices, 2004
  • State of Nevada & Washoe County School District
  • State of Nevada & Washoe County School District
  • 8 Recommendations for Improving the Achievement of Hispanic/Latino Students 1. Implement a district wide plan. 2. Recruit bilingual teachers. 3. Conduct ongoing professional development. 4. Provide ELL program articulation within schools. 5. Recognize and respect heritage. 6. Provide academic and emotional support. 7. Engage in authentic conversations. 8. Seek outside facilitation.Source: Journal of Latinos and Education
  • 8 Recommendations for Improving the Achievement of Hispanic/Latino StudentsSource: Journal of Latinos and Education
  • Nelson Clip