What 50,000 members say

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Highlights from the ASAE Foundation "Decision to" research study, as presented at ASAE's 2013 Annual Meeting. Association trends, membership models, volunteer relations, professional development and …

Highlights from the ASAE Foundation "Decision to" research study, as presented at ASAE's 2013 Annual Meeting. Association trends, membership models, volunteer relations, professional development and the ultimate question.

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  • What 50,000 Members Say: Insights from the 'Decision to' Research Series Monday, August 5, 2013 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM Room: B214 Wouldn’t it be great if you had the time to ask people about what motivates them to join, volunteer, and participate in associations? The ASAE Foundation has done the legwork for you, and distilled the findings into insightful takeaways on what influences the decision to join, learn, volunteer, and give. Get a high-level summary of the most useful findings, hear real-world examples of how associations are leveraging these new opportunities, and discuss how you can too! Leave with new insights to strategically manage your organization based on exceptional research from over 50,000 current and prospective members. 
  • Knowledge is knowing that Eggplant is a Fruit …
  • Wisdom is knowing NOT to put it in fruit salad.
  • Finding: All respondent groups think the benefits for the good of the order are just slightly more important than personal benefits.Conventional wisdom, and many past programs, have suggested that the decision to join is rooted in ROI, value to individual. While personal value is important, the good of the order is actually significantly more important.For example, others suggest dollar value for every benefit … may not be that direct.Have associations put too much emphasis on marketing the personal benefits? Personal benefits make a compelling case for return on investment (ROI) reasons that an individual may use to justify membership.The good-of-the-order benefits to the field raise the tides under everyone.Mean index for personal benefits was 3.4 and 3.6 for good-of-the-order benefits.Discussion Questions: • Should individual membership associations: – Market the value of their services to employers more directly? – Consider employer needs more directly when setting strategic priorities? Discussion Question:Does your brand communicate that you represent both the individual and the group? What are you doing in your marketing strategy to convey both messages? What could you do differently?
  • The next two slides are an exercise I have found great to illustrate the adage “the reason why people will join is the reason why they will leave.” Slide 1 demonstrates an association featuring THE WRONG things to sell .. Exemplified by the Bose radio discount (as if that will help long-time renewals!)Idaho educators associationThe Idaho Education Association advocates the professional and personal well-being of its members and the vision of excellence in public education, the foundation of the future."
  • Slide 2 demonstrates an association that has done a good job of balancing the “good of the order” benefits with personal benefits. It is from a UK antique store trade association …. It is easy to imagine that people who join based on recruitment outlining the reasons outlined above will become engaged and be a long term member of the association. Get people to join for the right reason.Be bodacious in selling the need to care about the good of the order.Ensure a balanced approach of good of the order and personal benefits — perhaps even a variety of approaches over time.
  • Not necessarily join, but hear of. Build awareness.The Hidden Goldmine – Educators!Discussion Questions:Does your association have an adequate presence in the academic realm? What could you do to increase its presence?How do you recognize their unique role as promoters of your association? How do you help your members promote your association? Viral communication campaigns.Findings:Academic members … Have influence over the largest market; studentsLess likely to drop membershipLess likely to change careersMore likely to belong to associationMore willing to volunteerMore likely to be an association promoter
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role?Governance 6.8%Committee 7.8%Ad hoc15.5%None69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role?Governance 6.8%Committee 7.8%Ad hoc15.5%None69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role?Governance 6.8%Committee 7.8%Ad hoc15.5%None69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role?Governance 6.8%Committee 7.8%Ad hoc15.5%None69.9%
  • Values drive volunteer choices.The power of the direct askA meaningful experience keeps them coming back.Involving the younger generationsThe professional benefits of volunteerismRecognizing the “ad hoc” volunteerThose who do not currently volunteer simply may not have been asked.Volunteers respond to a wide variety of motivations, incentives and recruitment strategiesAssociation volunteers are more receptive to the career benefits of volunteering, but opportunities to do something for a cause that is important to them still matter moreVolunteers follow different patterns of engagement, which may in turn affect satisfaction and turnover Volunteers who serve an organization through largely informal activities may require additional organizational effort to track, support, and recognize for their efforts.
  • Local Leaders - Focused on local chapter board and committee service Mentoring, coaching, tutoring, and membership recruitmentTwo thirds at entry or mid-career levels of employment. Less involved in governance for the parent organization. Writers - The “subject matter experts” of your organization:Presentations, expert panelsPublishing Standards reviewTeachers - Mentoring, coaching, tutoring, professional advice and membership recruitmentContribute the fewest volunteer hours for the cosponsor organization Engaged in every activity and perform the majority of volunteer work within the associations participating in this study. MentoringMembership recruitmentLocal and national board and committee service PresentationsFund raising Older ages, longer membership span, more academic backgrounds, more senior career levels.
  • There’s always going to be some turnover. It’s useful for an organization to know why supporters don’t volunteer – be sure to ask them periodically so you don’t assume the reasons are beyond your control.And in fact we were struck by the number of reasons members gave for not volunteering that could be addressed with fairly simple adjustments to a volunteer program. About 20-40% of members gave these five reasons. There are others in the book. This is where you come in. Although you’re never going to interest all of your membership in volunteering, it’s good to see some achievable ways to increase member volunteering – especially by providing regular, direct and consistent information to members about the opportunities. You may question why I categorize the fact that members volunteer elsewhere as something that could be controlled – but recall that association members are already volunteering for multiple organizations. I don’t think it’s an either/or proposition to get them interested in your organization versus another volunteer opportunity. But you do have to be able to present them with a compelling reason for why they should volunteer for you.
  • Operational Definition: Any learning, formal or informal, structured or self-directed, live or electronic, voluntary or required to help you grow professionally OR in your job or career.
  • Operational Definition: Any learning, formal or informal, structured or self-directed, live or electronic, voluntary or required to help you grow professionally OR in your job or career.Overall, respondents spent a median of $1,500 (millenials) to $2,000 (pre-war).Overall, average spending was $3,280. Of that: Employer: $1,577 Out of personal pocket: $1,391 Other entity: $31210% were/are enrolled in college degree programs within the past 12 months …. (mostly at Master’s and more advanced levels.)21% were/are enrolled in a certificate, vocational, or technical program.52% participated in both in-person & online.35% are in-person only; 6% “distance only”
  • “Regardless of whether or not you have participated in any professional education in the last 12 months, please rate the degree to which each of the attributes motivates your decision to participate in ANY professional education program.”As a whole, respondents rated the “intrinsic” motivations highest, followed by those that directly relate to employment, with the “extrinsic” motivations at the bottom of the list. 1 = This will not motivate me to attend a professional development program5 = Very strong motivation“Associations must connect their learners’ strong desire to learn with their preferences for programming, particularly that which will increase their cognitive engagement and learning accomplishment.”One notable difference: For the youngest respondents (Millennials), “To receive a promotion or pay raise” is notably higher: 3.89 , #6 out of 15 (vs. 11 – 13 for others) {Gen X 3.44, 11}
  • One notable difference: For the youngest respondents (Millennials), “To receive a promotion or pay raise” is notably higher: 3.89 , #6 out of 15 (vs. 11 – 13 for others) {Gen X 3.44, 11} The youngest members have different motivations to learn.The youngest members did report some important differences in learning motivations. As this slide shows, their top motivation is to increase competence in their job. They are the only generation who did not select “To keep up-to-date professionally.” This difference suggests a different appeal to these younger members might be successful. Other significant differences are that the Millenials were much more likely to report being motivated by a pay raise or promotion, ranking this as their 6th motivation, while it is 11th, 12th or 13th for other groups. The Millenials report lower motivation to attend programs because they are offered by accredited or highly recognized providers. Millenials:“To increase competence in your job”
  • Percentage of respondents participating in any professional education with provider

Transcript

  • 1. What 50,000 Members Say: Insights from the 'Decision to' Research Monday, August 5, 2013 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM Room B214 Hashtag: #ASAE13 LM42 Greg Melia, CAE @gmeliacae Chief Membership & Volunteer Relations Officer ASAE
  • 2. ASAE Foundation Research • 2007 Decision to Join (17,000 respondents, 18 co-sponsors) • 2008 Decision to Volunteer (26,000 respondents, 23 co-sponsors) • 2010 – Decision to Learn (8,000 respondents, 12 co-sponsors) • 2011 Decision to Join Follow-up (13,000 respondents, 18 co- sponsors)
  • 3. Knowledge Photo credit: Dunbar gardens on Flickr
  • 4. Wisdom Photo credit: Carol Browne on Flickr
  • 5. Presentation Information
  • 6. Car Rental Discount: $55 Insurance Discount: $150 Payroll service: $400 Magazine: $65 Website access: PRICELESS Membership saves you over $670!
  • 7. Car Rental Discount: $55 Insurance Discount: $150 Payroll service: $400 Magazine: $65 Website access: PRICELESS Membership saves you over $670!
  • 8. Personal Benefits (3.4) Career info and employment opportunities Access to products, services and suppliers Opportunities to gain leadership experience Reference directory of members Member discounts/group purchasing Access to information Professional development /education Networking with other professionals Good of the Order (3.6) Providing quality standards/guidelines Gathering, analyzing trends Maintaining a code of ethics Conducting research Promoting public awareness of field Influencing legislation and regulations Supporting students in the field Attracting competent people to the field Certification/Critical competencies Giving awards/recognition for excellence A person’s decision to join is not just a cost-benefit analysis.
  • 9. What is this organization about? • Win a Free Hertz Car Rental Certificate and AMEX Gift Card • Quicken WillMaker Discount • Credit and Debt Counseling through the ??? • Maintaining Your Standard of Living in Retirement • Importance of Risk Management - Insurance • Financial Literacy Lessons in English and Spanish from Wells Fargo • Member Discounts for Bose Radio Systems. • Win a Free Subscription to the ??? Magazine. 9 • California Casualty – 20 Year Partnership. • Protect Your Home While on Vacation. • One Credit Class Coming – “Keys to Financial Health.” • Win Free Stuff in May and June from ??? Member Benefits. • ??? Delegate Assembly Showcases Member Benefits. • The Green Book – 39% Discount. • Save This Summer with Your ??? Access Card. • Hertz Rental Car – Extra Weekend Discount.
  • 10. What is this organization about? • BENEFITS OF MEMBERSHIP – ??? represents its members' interests, provides money-saving services, promotes them in this country and across the world, and alerts them to the pitfalls of current legislation and regulation. We are proactive on their behalf, taking the lead in matters affecting the trade, seeking to articulate their views and taking new initiatives to support them and the ??? trade as a whole. As well as the Association's advice and active support, members are entitled to a wide range of benefits: • FINANCIAL BENEFITS: – Insurance; Free legal advice; Free Tax advice; Healthcare; Credit and Debit Card processing; further discounts; free entry for all members on the Association's site; and Gift Vouchers and Wedding Present Service: available to the public and only redeemable through a ??? member. • PROMOTIONAL BENEFITS: – ??? Logo; :Code of Practice recognized by the buying public and press as the trade standard.; Due Diligence Guidelines; Conciliation; Publicity; Directory of Members; Publications; Government Representation; and Conferences and seminars. 10
  • 11. 11 How did you first learn about the association?
  • 12. 12 None 69.9% What are typical volunteer involvement levels in associations?
  • 13. 13 Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9% What are typical volunteer involvement levels in associations?
  • 14. 14 Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9% What are typical volunteer involvement levels in associations?
  • 15. 15 Governance 6.8% Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9% What are typical volunteer involvement levels in associations?
  • 16. Value of Engagement 40% 32% 29% 47% 34% 20% 61% 27% 12% 66% 22% 13% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% No Volunteer Role Ad hoc Committee Board Detractor Passive Promoter
  • 17. I. There is high competition for time, talent & attention II. Different strokes for different folks III. What and how you ask are very important IV. It’s not over when the ask is accepted What We Learned in Decision to Volunteer
  • 18. Different strokes for different folks Local Leaders 22.9 % Writers 26.7 % Teachers 32.8 % Shapers 17.6 % Note: Not all volunteers want to be on the Board!
  • 19. Why members don’t volunteer? Uncontrollable reasons: 1. Time constraints 2. Family or professional responsibilities Controllable reasons: 1. Lack of info about volunteer opportunities. 2. Volunteer elsewhere. 3. Never asked to volunteer. 4. Lack of info about virtual volunteer opportunities. 5. Lack of info about short-term assignments. 6. Location, location, location.
  • 20. Getting Them I would start volunteering if: 1. Meaningful opportunity 2. Right skills 3. Accessible location 4. Interest in volunteering I first learn about volunteer opportunities by: 1. Asked by staff or another volunteer (22%) 2. Local chapter, section (14%) 3. Meeting, conference (13%) 4. Ad or call for volunteers (10%)
  • 21. Make it simple to get involved.
  • 22. Make it simple to get involved.
  • 23. Communicate details and benefits.
  • 24. Link volunteer work to your mission. Charge tied to mission, work plan Work plan includes volunteer elements
  • 25. 98% Participated in Professional Education Actual Learning Utilization % Used In person educational program 52% - 64% On-the-job demonstrations 51% Self-paced study (books, manuals, CDs or other offline-media) 51% In-house employer training 46% - 49% Distance learning (of any type) 9 % - 37% Preferred Learning Formats Total In person educational program, of any type 3.71 -3.95 In-house (by your employer or outside instructor) 3.52 Distance learning, of any type 2.58 - 2.68
  • 26. Why engage in professional education? Mean To keep up to date professionally 4.55 To increase competence in your job 4.49 To learn completely new skills or knowledge 4.30 To maintain or improve skills or knowledge that you already have 4.17 To increase your self-confidence as a professional or practitioner 4.15 To collaborate or share knowledge with others 3.82 To interact or network with professional colleagues 3.80 Because it is offered by a provider that is accredited or highly recognized 3.72 To get or keep a state, national or industry license required to practice 3.67 To get or keep a certification that sets you apart but is not required for practice 3.51 Because your employer requires it 3.30 To receive a promotion or pay raise 3.29 Because your employer recommends it 3.25
  • 27. What about Millenials? • Different motivations to learn •Top motivation: “To increase competence in your job” •6th out of 13 motivation: To receive a promotion or pay raise (versus near last for others): • Different preference in instructors •Less interested in suppliers, vendors and practitioners •More interested in academics and professional trainers
  • 28. Utilization of Association PD Cosponsor program Another association’s program
  • 29. Lesson #6:
  • 30. Instant Access 2006 2011 Net change Social media n/a 7.2 7.2 E-newsletters 52.3 57.4 5.1 Communities of practice 11.9 14.6 2.7 Blogs or podcasts 2 4 2 Internet searches 17.6 18.7 1.1 Peer networks 12.5 13.1 0.6 Association website 47.2 45.4 -1.8 Print newspapers 3.3 3.4 0.1 General interest magazines 4 3.4 -0.6 Other print sources 6.7 6 -0.7 Conferences/meetings 53.3 49.5 -3.8 Magazines/Journals 63.6 50.8 -12.8
  • 31. Formally Edited 2006 2011 Net change E-newsletters 52.3 57.4 5.1 Print newspapers 3.3 3.4 0.1 General interest magazines 4 3.4 -0.6 Other print sources 6.7 6 -0.7 Association website 47.2 45.4 -1.8 Conferences/meetings 53.3 49.5 -3.8 Magazines/Journals 63.6 50.8 -12.8 Social media n/a 7.2 7.2 Communities of practice 11.9 14.6 2.7 Blogs or podcasts 2 4 2 Internet searches 17.6 18.7 1.1 Peer networks 12.5 13.1 0.6
  • 32. Greg Melia, CAE gmelia@asaecenter.org 202-626-2821 Thank You! Visit www.asaefoundation.org to learn more or get involved in the ASAE Foundation ASAE publications available in the onsite bookstore and online at www.asaecenter.org/bookstore.