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Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
Member Engagement and Growth
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Member Engagement and Growth

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Presentation on member engagement and evolving business models for chambers of commerce to the 8th World Chambers Congress in Doha, Qatar on April 25, 2013.

Presentation on member engagement and evolving business models for chambers of commerce to the 8th World Chambers Congress in Doha, Qatar on April 25, 2013.

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  • Membership engagement & growth This session will reveal typical obstacles to member engagement and share insight into practices you can use to maximize the full potential of your Chamber’s membership. Chambers of commerce represent some of the strongest networks of business leaders in the world, yet traditional governance models limit leadership involvement through governance structures built on Board and Committee structures, defined terms of service, and cultural practices that can inhibit new thinking and maximum success. Research shows that you can help your organization grow by adopting new practices that engage a greater percentage of your members as participatory leaders. Decision to Volunteer:  Why people give their time to associations and how you can engage them Want to attract, engage, retain, and work more effectively with people who volunteer their time and talent to your organization? Learn what ASAE’s Decision to Volunteer research study has to say about their motivations. In addition to revealing key findings, this session will explore what the findings mean for your organization. You're sure to walk away with  a better understanding of volunteer turn-on and turn-offs, as well as practical ideas that you can implement to improve your volunteer program.
  • Knowledge is knowing that Eggplant is a Fruit …
  • Wisdom is knowing NOT to put it in fruit salad.
  • Idaho educators association The Idaho Education Association advocates the professional and personal well-being of its members and the vision of excellence in public education, the foundation of the future."
  • Not necessarily join, but hear of. Build awareness. Discussion Questions: Does your association have an adequate presence in the academic realm? What could you do to increase its presence? How do you recognize their unique role as promoters of your association? How do you help your members promote your association? Viral communication campaigns.
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role? Governance 6.8% Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role? Governance 6.8% Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role? Governance 6.8% Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9%
  • Let’s start with a little benchmarking. This slide shows the average extent and types of volunteering across the 18 co-sponsoring organizations in our Decision to Join study. In addition to giving a benchmark, it also raises some interesting philosophical questions … namely, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have 70% of your members paying dues but not fulfilling ANY type of volunteer role? Governance 6.8% Committee 7.8% Ad hoc 15.5% None 69.9%
  • One lens on the “mailboxer” question that I found very insightful are the findings related to “The Ultimate Question” from the Decision to Join. In short, we see that those members who volunteer are more likely to be a promoter of the association – powerful stuff indeed. And that’s in addition to all of the other benefits volunteering brings to the organization and to the member, as demonstrated on the next slide … Answers based on a 10 point scale 9-10 Promoter 7-8 Passive 6 or less Detractor Probability of being a “promoter” of the association increases with level of involvement Advocacy, networking and leadership opportunities become more important as level of involvement increases Finding: The probability of being a “promoter” of the association increases with one’s level of involvement. Members who do not become involved in their association are perilously close to former members in their estimations of the value they receive. Fifteen percent of the survey respondents said they were involved at the governing or committee level, which is about the level of involvement many association execs cite when asked about the participation level in their association. But another 16% of the survey respondents were involved in single task activities that set them on the path to high promoter status. This would indicate that the way associations define and track “ involvement” may warrant greater strategic attention than it is given. Levels of Involvement Discussion Question: • Do associations appreciate the importance of these ad hoc, single task volunteers and expand the opportunities for members to become involved in this way? • Is involvement managed systematically? • How does your association deal with this? International Issues
  • There’s always going to be some turnover. It’s useful for an organization to know why supporters don’t volunteer – be sure to ask them periodically so you don’t assume the reasons are beyond your control. And in fact we were struck by the number of reasons members gave for not volunteering that could be addressed with fairly simple adjustments to a volunteer program. About 20-40% of members gave these five reasons. There are others in the book. This is where you come in. Although you’re never going to interest all of your membership in volunteering, it’s good to see some achievable ways to increase member volunteering – especially by providing regular, direct and consistent information to members about the opportunities. You may question why I categorize the fact that members volunteer elsewhere as something that could be controlled – but recall that association members are already volunteering for multiple organizations. I don’t think it’s an either/or proposition to get them interested in your organization versus another volunteer opportunity. But you do have to be able to present them with a compelling reason for why they should volunteer for you.
  • Those who do not currently volunteer simply may not have been asked. Volunteers respond to a wide variety of motivations, incentives and recruitment strategies Association volunteers are more receptive to the career benefits of volunteering, but opportunities to do something for a cause that is important to them still matter more Volunteers follow different patterns of engagement, which may in turn affect satisfaction and turnover Volunteers who serve an organization through largely informal activities may require additional organizational effort to track, support, and recognize for their efforts.
  • Greg and Julie debrief convo from slide 6 3 minutes Twenty to thirty years ago the majority of associations typically derived more than half of their revenues from membership dues ( Association Operating Ratio Report , ASAE, 1973). New Models of Associating journal article - “value proposition:” What do our customers/members want from us, and how do they want it delivered and at what price/exchange? That conversation has echoed through the association community as the competition for members’ loyalty, time, and dollars has leaders examining their organizations’ structures, benefits, governance, programs, activities, and strategic positions in the marketplace. The association “corner on the market” was thought to be “community,” but few seemed clear about the successful application of it and how to harness the concept of community as a business model. Fast Company ’ s Web Site provides information on its Company of Friends. It is described as the “magazine's readers' network… a global online and offline community of self-organizing groups of forward-thinking business leaders and innovators. Members help each other improve their careers, companies, and communities.” The site goes on to describe the benefits of membership: Connect with like-minded business leaders; Participate in "intelligent networking" activities and events; Engage in stimulating discussion about leading-edge business ideas and practices; The Company of Friends certainly thinks, feels, and acts like an association. But is it really? After all, there are no dues, bylaws, articles of incorporation, or boards of directors. It is, however, what associations are about at their core: bringing individuals with similar interests together to pool knowledge, solve problems, and create opportunities. He compared Fast Company with HBR. “HBR was like a note in a bottle.  Fast Company ’s format was intended to stimulate a conversation that people get involved in.” Membership in the Willow Creek Community Church (WCCC) is growing and thriving. Half of the people attending WCCC on a typical weekend service are not considered members of the church. It ’s the preferred way of WCCC. Members are not just names in a database — they are the core of the church. Becoming a participating member involves four stages: investigation, affirmation, confirmation, and celebration. The process involves studying the scripture, completing a questionnaire describing one’s intentions of joining the church, a personal interview, and celebrating that a new member has become a participant of WCCC. Communities connect members and nonmembers in groups of six or more with common interests or bonds. The Willow Creek Association (WCA) was founded in 1992 to link “like-minded, action-oriented churches with each other and with strategic vision, training, and resources.” So, if the model is being challenged, what are the socioeconomic, demographic, and other factors are most likely to influence membership models of the future
  • Every 8 seconds someone will turn 65. Thousands of members will retire in the next 10 years Generations X and Y values the opportunity to: Lead Learn Make a difference. (Sheri, these points all come from Sarah Sladek ’s new book for ASAE that will be released at Annual. If you prefer to add/replace with your research on generations, totally understand. “ Two key factors have evolved that will prevent associations from ever having success by doing things the way they have been done for the past three centuries: technology and demographic shifts.” Sladek Technology has been a game-changer, giving people access to networks and information without the assistance of associations. Yet, the hurdle that technology poses pales in comparison to the generational shift that ’s about to occur in the 21st century. Workers who suffered a spell of unemployment during Great Recession are, on average, less satisfied with their new jobs than workers who didn’t. They are more likely to consider themselves over-qualified for their current position. A majority of the re-employed (55%) report their family is worse off financially now than before the recession started. More than a third (35%) report they have had to make major changes in their lifestyle because of the bad economy; by contrast, just 20% of Americans who didn’t lose their job during the recession say the same. While they were out of work, six-in-ten of the re-employed seriously thought about switching fields; four-in-ten considered moving to an area where jobs were more plentiful and nearly as many went back to school or enrolled in job-retraining. From now until 2030, every eight seconds someone will turn 65. This shift in human capital—the largest shift in our country ’s history—poses the greatest threat to associations because most associations remain entirely governed and supported by the Baby Boomer generation, and few have or are developing strategies to cushion themselves from this massive exodus of board members, committee chairs, and dedicated volunteers. , The New Recruit: What Your Association Needs to Know About X, Y, & Z   (2007):   “ The Boomer-centric associations still think they can launch something new and it will resolve all their recruiting woes. These associations have overlooked the simple fact that the vast majority of their membership will retire in the next decade or two—and the generations to follow are radically different from the generations of the past two centuries.
  • Sarah & Greg 3 minute description 3 minute table discussions 5 minute debrief … (here and using next slide) These are drawn from Sarah ’s new book. There is a lot of information, so your feedback on how to present is asked. Would it make sense to introduce the models and synopsis, and then have participants brainstorm pros & cons? Five membership models have emerged: customized, electronic, international, multitier, and open. These models hold the most promise for associations to generate new revenue streams and grow membership. International Membership Many associations claim to be global organizations because they offer memberships to people residing in other countries. However, when evaluating whether or not to add international memberships to your roster, it is best to consider what services will be provided to international members, what increased costs (if any) are involved in serving this new membership class, and what benefits are included.   Some organizations treat international memberships similar to virtual or e-memberships, where the benefits include members-only access to website content, e-newsletters, and e-learning options but do not include face-to-face learning programs or print materials that are costly to mail internationally and frequently don ’t arrive to their intended recipients. For example, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recently made the decision to give international members access to an e-membership option. The only change in member benefits is that publications are delivered electronically and the membership is offered at an affordable rate of just $50. Other associations develop benefits unique to international members, such as international programming and content. ARMA International (Association of Records Managers and Administrators) has approximately 10,000 members in more than 30 countries. ARMA is home to an International Relations Committee (IRC) that represents the interests of the international members. ARMA has focused on the growth of this membership category, hosting an international conference and an International Day program dedicated to issues specific to records and information management professionals outside North America. In addition, ARMA provides several online courses, downloadable resources for international members, and a journal featuring articles about industry trends and how they are affecting the management of records and information around the world.   The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) also touts international membership as a vital part of its members-only network and the association ’s mission to stay on the cutting edge of the housing industry's globalization. NAHB international members receive special rates on the International Builder’s Show, education seminars, products, and other amenities that combine information sharing with networking opportunities. NAHB’s International Department compiles resources and organizes events especially for its international audience and U.S. members interested in working globally.  
  • These are drawn from Sarah ’s new book. There is a lot of information, so your feedback on how to present is asked. Would it make sense to introduce the models and synopsis, and then have participants brainstorm pros & cons? Five membership models have emerged: customized, electronic, international, multitier, and open. These models hold the most promise for associations to generate new revenue streams and grow membership. International Membership Many associations claim to be global organizations because they offer memberships to people residing in other countries. However, when evaluating whether or not to add international memberships to your roster, it is best to consider what services will be provided to international members, what increased costs (if any) are involved in serving this new membership class, and what benefits are included.   Some organizations treat international memberships similar to virtual or e-memberships, where the benefits include members-only access to website content, e-newsletters, and e-learning options but do not include face-to-face learning programs or print materials that are costly to mail internationally and frequently don ’t arrive to their intended recipients. For example, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recently made the decision to give international members access to an e-membership option. The only change in member benefits is that publications are delivered electronically and the membership is offered at an affordable rate of just $50. Other associations develop benefits unique to international members, such as international programming and content. ARMA International (Association of Records Managers and Administrators) has approximately 10,000 members in more than 30 countries. ARMA is home to an International Relations Committee (IRC) that represents the interests of the international members. ARMA has focused on the growth of this membership category, hosting an international conference and an International Day program dedicated to issues specific to records and information management professionals outside North America. In addition, ARMA provides several online courses, downloadable resources for international members, and a journal featuring articles about industry trends and how they are affecting the management of records and information around the world.   The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) also touts international membership as a vital part of its members-only network and the association ’s mission to stay on the cutting edge of the housing industry's globalization. NAHB international members receive special rates on the International Builder’s Show, education seminars, products, and other amenities that combine information sharing with networking opportunities. NAHB’s International Department compiles resources and organizes events especially for its international audience and U.S. members interested in working globally.  
  • Greg 2 minutes Some alternatives - When reporting to the board, he stresses customers and level of engagement over the number of members. De-emphasizing membership as a key indicator of success for associations leads to the de-emphasis of the basket of goods. Taking it out to the ultimate conclusion would be the exciting but controversial prospect of unbundling membership benefits, a.k.a. cafeteria-style membership or membership á la carte. It's been talked about plenty but rarely put into practice. Sirkin notes that the American Association of Retired Persons has unbundled its membership, but that in general it can be very challenging. "For a lot of associations, unbundling membership benefits and selling them separately is not a cost-effective solution," she says. "To do that, the association then has to be prepared to market each benefit separately from membership. “ A-la-carte/Unbundled Members pick and choose from your selection of products and services – pricing is dependent upon whatever they choose. Bundled Pre-selecting some of your products and services and offering them as pre-set packages ( “bundles”) at differing prices. Virtual Membership Growing in popularity as organizations increase their international reach; also good for organizations who operate exclusively in a particular geographic area but have members elsewhere. Also popular with those who prefer the information to the face-to-face networking. Dues “floor” and “cap” Often used when a % of the organizational budget or revenue is used to calculate dues.  How might this be established? Other Organizational memberships within individual memberships  "square root of assets or total revenue." Using this formula, once the median is found, the rate goes up equally for all categories until the larger asset company's revenue hits the scale and then goes up gradually (by approximately one third, as opposed to doubling the rate). This has the effect of making larger companies pay more, but not at double or triple the rate as assets rise through mergers and acquisitions (see sidebar, "Squaring Off Your Dues Structure," for more information). So, they pay more, but not in proportion to smaller units, and caps can be avoided.
  • Don dea 43 minutes The following slides provide examples of associations that demonstrate previous conversation points. I would like a separate volunteer to cover each … or, if you have a different personal example you ’d suggest to replace the provided example, just speak up! Example of CUSTOMIZED/MULTI-TIER: One example of an association pursuing just such a strategy is the International Facility Management Association (IFMA). Beginning in 2003, IFMA members will choose from the following membership options:   $150  Base Membership, Electronic Delivery  + $30  Mail Delivery  + $95  Chapter Membership  + $30  Council Membership PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP PACKAGE (chapter membership plus all options) Created for members' convenience, the Premium Membership Package includes all IFMA benefits. Choose this valuable option, and we will activate your membership with the following benefits: chapter membership, PLUS one council memberships, PLUS IFMA Foundation Contribution, PLUS mail delivery of benefits and services. Council Membership (additional $55 (U.S.) per council) IFMA councils meet the industry-specific networking and information needs of its members on a global level. Services offered by councils may include: Targeted newsletters, directories and other publications Listservs-electronic discussion groups Teleconference meetings and discussions Benchmarking and best practices studies Council-specific websites Mail Delivery of IFMA Benefits (additional $42 (U.S.)) With the Mail Delivery option, you still have access to your membership benefits on www.ifma.org, but you also receive materials via postal mail service. With your basic membership, you have electronic delivery of IFMA benefits and services; however, if you would like to receive hard copies of IFMA information, then please select this option on your renewal form.   http://www.ifma.org/membership/mem_dues.cfm
  • Sue 4 minutes National Trust for Historic Preservation describes their structure as one whereby 150,000 donors support the services provided to their 7-8,000 leader members Texas Medical Association , operating in what may in fact be a small country, has 35,200 physician members and another 9,100 student and resident members. Their relationship to their chapters is much like a national to state relationship. They have conjoint membership with local county medical societies, supporting local chapters with technological assistance, billing services, database management, IT support, website development, marketing and messaging, graphics and printing assistance, and speakers for events. They spend time and money making sure county medical societies are successful. "A member for them is a member for us and vice versa. We also have spent time building our association brand over the years and it has paid off. “TMA student memberships are free, residents pay $40, first-year docs pay $244, and actives pay $489.   Carolinas Independent Automobile Dealers Assoc . increased dues 27% in 2008 after not increasing dues for 12 years. Rather than change dues, they added the VIP card which offers $1800 in discounts on various services. This is available to regular members but not associate/vendors. International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering "Emerging Economy" membership to ensure that the international element of this core value was realized. Individual dues for the category are priced at 30 euro, considerably lower than the 140 euro paid by active individual members. "They are individuals in pharmaceutical manufacturing and technology in countries that ISPE classifies as 'emerging economies' based on the World Bank rating," says Linda G. Brady, CAE, director of membership services for the association. ISPE determined that membership growth in countries where the pharmaceutical industry is rapidly growing would be stifled unless it offered a lower-cost membership option. By delivering its magazine and newsletter via its Web site as a PDF, which eliminated printing and mailing costs to emerging-economy countries,
  • Data-mining & Business Intelligence from AMS enabled segmentation Open membership drives value engagement Maintain membership growth during economic downturn without increasing staff http://www.ndia.org/MembershipAndChapters/Pages/MembershipPackages.aspx http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5fkyFAgXWo Doubled revenue with same staff business automation AHA moment: Government members were an underserved segment: they attend conferences, but not joining. Our current model was an old model, little automation. Massive growth required web based tools to manage relationships Grew govt members from handful to 21,000 Pilot first, soft launch, learn test, adjust, go big when you are seeing results Decision based in customer data
  • Sue 4 minutes National Trust for Historic Preservation describes their structure as one whereby 150,000 donors support the services provided to their 7-8,000 leader members Texas Medical Association , operating in what may in fact be a small country, has 35,200 physician members and another 9,100 student and resident members. Their relationship to their chapters is much like a national to state relationship. They have conjoint membership with local county medical societies, supporting local chapters with technological assistance, billing services, database management, IT support, website development, marketing and messaging, graphics and printing assistance, and speakers for events. They spend time and money making sure county medical societies are successful. "A member for them is a member for us and vice versa. We also have spent time building our association brand over the years and it has paid off. “TMA student memberships are free, residents pay $40, first-year docs pay $244, and actives pay $489.   Carolinas Independent Automobile Dealers Assoc . increased dues 27% in 2008 after not increasing dues for 12 years. Rather than change dues, they added the VIP card which offers $1800 in discounts on various services. This is available to regular members but not associate/vendors. International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering "Emerging Economy" membership to ensure that the international element of this core value was realized. Individual dues for the category are priced at 30 euro, considerably lower than the 140 euro paid by active individual members. "They are individuals in pharmaceutical manufacturing and technology in countries that ISPE classifies as 'emerging economies' based on the World Bank rating," says Linda G. Brady, CAE, director of membership services for the association. ISPE determined that membership growth in countries where the pharmaceutical industry is rapidly growing would be stifled unless it offered a lower-cost membership option. By delivering its magazine and newsletter via its Web site as a PDF, which eliminated printing and mailing costs to emerging-economy countries,
  • Sue 3 minutes Focus on market creation/affinity opportunity Detroit Regional Chamber created seven membership tiers, ranging from $80 at the entry or product level to $5,700 at the gold level. Value elements were added at each tier. Often the elements had to be created, and sometimes they were mined from the value inherent in many of the chamber's existing programs. DRC tiered down to make itself the price leader for affinity programs and tiered up to attract and keep members wanting deeper relationships, higher connectivity, and higher service levels. One of DRC's goals was to grow total revenue by increasing participation in its affinity programs--an option that's available at its lowest level of membership (health insurance) At the other end of the spectrum, DRC's goal was to allow members to select higher levels of membership, which would provide the service, involvement, and connection points that fit their expectations. Through the fulfillment of these goals, DRC wanted to become the Wal-Mart, the price leader, at one end of the spectrum and the Nordstrom, the relationship leader, at the other end, with varying levels in between. Prior to the initiative's launch, the chamber's dues base stood at $3 million, averaging $294 in dues per member, with a one-size-fits-all formula. Now, the dues base stands at $3.5 million, averaging $407 in dues per paying member. Significantly, product revenues for all the chamber's affinity programs have about quadrupled during the past nine years. Measuring member value DRC measures the value of a membership account based on a combination of the kinds of revenues generated by the member (dues, affinity programs, advertising, sponsorship, event attendance, and so forth). Because of the chamber's emphasis on a total financial relationship versus only membership dues, DRC has built a large membership base, and total membership now stands at just more than 21,000 firms versus just more than 10,000 firms when the program was launched.
  • Sue 4 minutes National Trust for Historic Preservation describes their structure as one whereby 150,000 donors support the services provided to their 7-8,000 leader members Texas Medical Association , operating in what may in fact be a small country, has 35,200 physician members and another 9,100 student and resident members. Their relationship to their chapters is much like a national to state relationship. They have conjoint membership with local county medical societies, supporting local chapters with technological assistance, billing services, database management, IT support, website development, marketing and messaging, graphics and printing assistance, and speakers for events. They spend time and money making sure county medical societies are successful. "A member for them is a member for us and vice versa. We also have spent time building our association brand over the years and it has paid off. “TMA student memberships are free, residents pay $40, first-year docs pay $244, and actives pay $489.   Carolinas Independent Automobile Dealers Assoc . increased dues 27% in 2008 after not increasing dues for 12 years. Rather than change dues, they added the VIP card which offers $1800 in discounts on various services. This is available to regular members but not associate/vendors. International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering "Emerging Economy" membership to ensure that the international element of this core value was realized. Individual dues for the category are priced at 30 euro, considerably lower than the 140 euro paid by active individual members. "They are individuals in pharmaceutical manufacturing and technology in countries that ISPE classifies as 'emerging economies' based on the World Bank rating," says Linda G. Brady, CAE, director of membership services for the association. ISPE determined that membership growth in countries where the pharmaceutical industry is rapidly growing would be stifled unless it offered a lower-cost membership option. By delivering its magazine and newsletter via its Web site as a PDF, which eliminated printing and mailing costs to emerging-economy countries,
  • The Whitney Museum of Art, New York
  • Sheri 3 minutes Multi-tier American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA) http://www.asta.org/join/?navItemNumber=1498 Core membership. These members will find ASTA making a real commitment to building a technology infrastructure to support enhanced online services, such as peer assistance and a knowledge system similar to that used by Dell, Microsoft, and other Fortune 500 firms. The strategy is geared to provide a relevant and immediate response to members' questions. "The core membership will find great value in this," says Ruden. "It's those types of repetitive questions and assistance queries that we need to institutionalize and deliver electronically." Core membership dues are $250 a year for an individual or agency. Premium membership. For $2,500 a year, each premium member has access to an account management team composed of one lead person and one or two additional staff backups. Teams will provide such services as advanced business consulting, customized research, public relations consulting, peer assistance, and a professional e-journal. Premium members may identify four additional employees of their agencies who will be eligible to access benefits.
  • Greg 3 minutes Open membership, plus multi-tier. Not ready to join? You can donate to the Chamber instead. Open Membership Perhaps the most controversial membership model evolving right now is the open membership, also known as a free membership. Here are the most popular reasons that associations give for looking to innovate their membership models with “no-dues” structures: Increase Membership Associations see an opportunity to bring more people, especially young people, into their communities by offering engagement opportunities that don ’t require a financial commitment up front. Develop Thought Leadership Associations see an opportunity to produce insightful, original, and helpful ideas and move their mission further than they can with structured membership programs. Offer Value Associations with decreasing membership are often tired of fighting to explain the value of a membership come renewal time. Eliminating dues for most members and allowing members to pay for only the programs and services that they find valuable can boost an association ’s value proposition by making the value it provides fit each member’s unique situation. The question of whether to collect dues is not the same for all associations. Missions, membership, and values differ from one association to the next. The art of pricing is specific to individual markets, offerings, and value propositions.   From the omission of dues to their reliance on technology and crowd sourcing, Senior Planners Industry Network (SPIN) flipped the traditional association model upside down. Here ’s how this association created its own membership model for success. Senior Planners Industry Network SPIN is a network of 2,300 top-level meeting and event planners throughout the world, all with at least 10 years of experience. Started in 2008, the association grew quickly, averaging 75 new members per month.    Shawna Suckow, founder of the association, started the association when she realized there weren ’t any associations targeting senior-level meeting planners. Also, she purposely wanted to create something substantially different than any other association. “I believe that today’s association model is outdated. It’s evident in the lagging membership numbers as well as in the imbalance between vendors and buyers. In our industry—the meeting industry—many of the major associations have memberships that are 70 percent vendors, which frustrates everyone. Events lose their focus; vendors don’t see the ROI when most of the crowd is their competition; and buyers don’t keep coming each month when their peers make up such a small percentage of the group,” Suckow explains. “I also believe that associations charge way too much just for the privilege of membership without any real, tangible value. Then to be charged for each monthly meeting on top of that is too much to ask.” SPIN offers members access to a private on-line forum full of resources and webinars for educational purposes. Shortly after its founding, SPIN launched live networking and educational events held at locations throughout the United States. “ The membership determines what they want to discuss at our live events and which cities we visit. We try to ‘crowd source’ everything, meaning we constantly ask the membership what they want, and then we deliver it,” Suckow says. SPIN is free to join, but members must meet two strict criteria: Members must be planners with a minimum of 10 years experience. Vendors are prohibited from membership. This keeps the network focused strictly on planner needs and avoids the need to cater to other interests in educational programming. Vendor participation is permitted in the form of sponsorships at SPIN ’s live events called Think Tanks, but participation is limited to only six companies per event. “ We believe keeping the focus on the planner is what has made us so successful in such a short time. It’s unique in our industry to be planner-centric, especially focused on senior-level planners. I believe these niche networks are the association model of the future,” Suckow says. “Our association model is inadvertently putting pressure on the huge associations to adapt or continue to see their memberships decrease,” Suckow says. “The old association model is dying and I don’t believe it can be revived, even when the economy recovers. I talk to buyers and vendors all the time, and both sides complain to me regularly about the major associations in our industry. “ Suckow believes the intense focus on delivering value to a very specific niche and not trying to be everything to everyone has resulted in a more meaningful, ROI-driven association for SPIN ’s members. SPIN is now traveling to multiple cities and selling out their sponsorships. Not surprising, Suckow has become an advocate for associations to experiment with new, innovative membership models. “ I believe in survival of the fittest. If you keep doing what you’ve always done, you’re going to continue to bleed memberships and lose sponsorships,” she says. “Associations have to adapt and make difficult choices to regain the support of lost membership and reinvigorate their groups.”  
  • Sarah closes, shares information about the new book availability. 4 minutes If you ’re looking for a cheat sheet for building a membership dominance, the advice in this book comes down to six key points: Understand what your members want and need. Develop member benefits that solve the problems of your target audience. Assess the costs to provide those benefits and get rid of anything that doesn ’t provide a benefit. Put a membership model in place that both aligns with the way your audience wants to pay to have their problems solved and makes it easy for your offering to sell. Test these offerings and revenue models with members and nonmembers. Make adjustments accordingly. Repeat. If you ’re looking for one piece of light-a-fire-under-my-CEO information it’s this: Change or die. There are no alternatives.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Membership engagement& growthGreg Melia, CAE@gmeliaCAE
    • 2. KnowledgePhoto credit: Dunbar gardens on Flickr
    • 3. WisdomPhoto credit: Carol Browne on Flickr
    • 4. Coming in August: The Art of Membership by Sheri Jacobs, CAE
    • 5. Key Decision To Join Findings
    • 6. What is this organization about?• Win a Free Hertz Car RentalCertificate and AMEX Gift Card• Quicken WillMaker Discount• Credit and Debt Counseling• Maintaining Your Standard of Livingin Retirement• Importance of Risk Management -Insurance• Financial Literacy Lessons in Englishand Spanish from Wells Fargo• Member Discounts for Bose RadioSystems.• California Casualty – 20 YearPartnership.• Protect Your Home While on Vacation.• One Credit Class Coming – “Keys toFinancial Health.”• Win Free Stuff in May and Junefrom ??? Member Benefits.• ??? Delegate Assembly ShowcasesMember Benefits.• The Green Book – 39% Discount.• Save This Summer with Your ???Access Card.
    • 7. • BENEFITS OF MEMBERSHIP– ??? represents its members interests, provides money-saving services, promotes them in thiscountry and across the world, and alerts them to the pitfalls of current legislation and regulation.We are proactive on their behalf, taking the lead in matters affecting the trade, seeking toarticulate their views and taking new initiatives to support them and the ??? trade as a whole. Aswell as the Associations advice and active support, members are entitled to a wide range ofbenefits:• FINANCIAL BENEFITS:– Insurance; Free legal advice; Free Tax advice; Healthcare; Credit and Debit Cardprocessing; further discounts; free entry for all members on the Associations site; andGift Vouchers and Wedding Present Service: available to the public and onlyredeemable through a ??? member.• PROMOTIONAL BENEFITS:– ??? Logo; :Code of Practice recognized by the buying public and press as the tradestandard.; Due Diligence Guidelines; Conciliation; Publicity; Directory of Members;What is this organization about?
    • 8. 8How did you first learn about the association?WordofMouthisGOLD!
    • 9. 9Typical Levels of InvolvementNone69.9%
    • 10. 10Typical Levels of InvolvementAd hoc 15.5%None69.9%
    • 11. 11Typical Levels of InvolvementCommittee 7.8%Ad hoc 15.5%None69.9%
    • 12. 12Typical Levels of InvolvementGovernance 6.8%Committee 7.8%Ad hoc 15.5%None69.9%
    • 13. Value of Engagement40%32%29%47%34%20%61%27%12%66%22%13%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%No VolunteerRoleAd hoc Committee BoardDetractorPassivePromoter
    • 14. Key Decision To Volunteer Findings
    • 15. Why members don’t volunteerUncontrollable reasons:1. Time constraints2. Family or professional responsibilitiesControllable reasons:1. Lack of info about volunteer opportunities.2. Volunteer elsewhere.3. Never asked to volunteer.4. Lack of info about virtual or short-term opportunities.
    • 16. Getting ThemI would start volunteering if:1. Meaningful opportunity2. Right skills3. Accessible locationI first learn about volunteer opportunities by:1. Asked by staff or another volunteer (22%)2. Local chapter, section (14%)3. Meeting, conference (13%)
    • 17. 10 volunteer improvement ideas1. Provide simple, yet meaningful, ways to get involved.2. Match opportunities and skills.3. Work to mitigate time and location barriers. (Virtual?)4. Incorporate and communicate benefits when possible.5. Link your volunteer program to your mission.6. Ask, ask, ask! (Don’t write off the non-volunteer.)7. Train staff to work with volunteers.8. Provide adequate resources.9. Coach staff on championing the value of volunteering.10. Recognize all volunteer contributions.
    • 18. The End of Membershipas We Know ItAndThe Art of Membership
    • 19. Traditional business model• Company membership• All members pay similar dues• Many “checkbook” members withlimited usage• Sponsors and advertising subsidizeeducation, meetings, andpublications• Joining is the operative normPhoto credit: Angusf on flickr
    • 20. Changing world• Technological advances• Demographic, gender and age diversity• Mass customization• Fiscal frugality
    • 21. EMERGING MEMBERSHIP MODELSSynopsis The Pros The ConsCustomized Members’ custom-buildmembership to suit theirneeds..Electronic Membership restricted to web-based resources and deliveryLocation-based Membership is predicated onlocation of member.Multitier Limited preset menu ofmembership optionsOpen No membership doesrequired.Based on: The End of Membership as We Know It (ASAE Press)
    • 22. EMERGING MEMBERSHIP MODELSSynopsis The Pros The ConsCustomized Members’ custom-buildmembership to suit theirneeds.Engagement from the start onhow to use their membership.Member has sense of control.Technologically challenging,complicated sales andimplementationElectronic Membership restricted to web-based resources and deliveryNew members may be addedwith limited expenses (e.g.mailing)Memberships may provide limitedrevenue. and engagement.Location-based Membership is predicated onlocation of member.Membership expands into newmarkets and regions, or moreappropriately priced.Programming may need to betweaked; engagement more difficult.Multitier Limited preset menu ofmembership optionsMembers like to choose optionthat best suit their needs.Technologically challenging,complicated sales andimplementationOpen No membership duesrequired.May lead to substantialmembership growth.No dues revenue. May be hard tomobilize base.Source: The End of Membership as We Know It (ASAE Press)
    • 23. Additional strategies• Focus on market creation/affinity program value• Specialized offers for segments within existingmembership or new markets• Hyper-bundling by adding benefits to membership• Hybrid individual/organizational structures• To address merger issues : Square root of assets ortotal revenue
    • 24. Case Studies
    • 25. Int’l Facility Mgmt Association• Basic Membership Package includes chapter membership andelectronic delivery of benefits and services• A la carte options to add Chapter Membership, Councilmembership, and US mail delivery.• Premium Membership Package includes Basic membershipchapter membership, PLUS one council memberships, PLUSIFMA Foundation Contribution, PLUS mail delivery of benefitsand services
    • 26. Another “customization”• Carolinas Independent Automobile Dealers Assn: added a VIPcard which offers $1800 in discounts on various services forassociation members (27% dues increase).
    • 27. Nat’l Defense Industry Assn.• Government members were an underserved segment• Data-mining & Business Intelligence from AMS enabledsegmentation• Open membership & value engagement• Automation of join process removed barriers to joining• Example: allow individuals to join, then sell upgrade toorganizational membership• Results: Doubled revenue with same staff
    • 28. Durham Chamber of Commerce• Three membership tiers• Durham 2.0 – “key investor group”, highest level• Business 2.0 – mid-level, mid-benefits• Entry-level – $99, all electronic• Custom options – Enhanced online listing.• Customer options – Non-member Cert. of Origin; Relocation Guide; Map
    • 29. Detroit Regional Chamber• Goals included grow total revenue through affinity programs• Seven membership tiers, ranging from $80 at the entry or productlevel to $5,700 at the gold level• Results after nine years:• Doubled involved firms• Dues revenue increased half a million• Affinity program revenues quadrupled
    • 30. Location-Based• Texas Society of Association Executives – Tiered pricing basedon budget, and proximity to legislative capitol.• International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering:"Emerging Economy" membership, offering greatly reducedelectronic membership to members in World Bank rated countries.
    • 31. The Whitney MuseumComing in August: The Art of Membership by Sheri Jacobs, CAE
    • 32. Family Membership• Whitney Kids Passport• Free admission to family programs• 50% off all Stroller Tours• Family guides for major exhibitsComing in August: The Art of Membership by Sheri Jacobs, CAE
    • 33. Insider Membership•Invitation for 2 to a Behind-theScenes tour of the Museum•Exclusive presentation by curatorialstaff with Q&A•Quarterly recommendations fromcurators and art insiders on NYCeventsComing in August: The Art of Membership by Sheri Jacobs, CAE
    • 34. American Society of Travel AgentsDual membership structure: Hi tech, and Hi touch•Core membership - geared to provide a relevant andimmediate response to members most frequent questionsthrough peer assistance and a sophisticated online knowledgesystem . $250•Premium membership - access to an account managementteam which provides advanced business consulting, customizedresearch, public relations consulting, peer assistance, and aprofessional e-journal. $2500
    • 35. US Chamber Of CommerceFriendsTiers:•Individual throughAdvisorAddt’l benefits:•Conference callupdates•Access to committeeservices& Members
    • 36. In conclusion …• Understand what your members want and need.• Develop member benefits that solve the problems.• Assess the costs to provide those benefits and get rid of anythingthat does not provide a benefit.• Put a membership model in place that aligns with how your audiencewill pay and makes it easy for you to sell.• Test these offerings and revenue models with members andnonmembers. Adjust accordingly.Source: The End of Membership as We Know It (ASAE Press)
    • 37. Thank you!Email: gmelia@asaecenter.org@gmeliaCAELet ASAE help you succeed.www.asaecenter.orgwww.associationsnow.com(Subscribe to FREE daily e-Newsletter)Greg Melia, CAEChief Membership & Volunteer Relations OfficerASAE: The Center for Association Leadership

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