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Effective feedback

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  • 1. Effective Feedback Should: -Be focused: Learning Intentions (being learnt) and success criteria (desired goal) -Be given in the right time -Provide guidance and strategies to improve
  • 2. Typology of feedback (P. Tunstall, C. Gipps, 1996) • Evaluative – involving judgment and can affect how students feel about themselves • Descriptive – what the student did and providing guidance for improvement. It is critical in ‘closing the gap’ for students
  • 3. Types of descriptive feedback (Clarke, 2003) Based on the needs of the student and focused around learning intention of the task, can be: 1-Reminder - calling back what was the lesson about. Ex: Remember the rule about… 2-Scaffold – giving possibilities. Ex: Why don’t you try using… 3-Example – giving clear examples. Ex: why don’t you use a simile word as…
  • 4. Written feedback Some student could: • have difficulty understanding the points you want to make. • be unable to read your writing. • can’t process the feedback/what next To check this out: ask them to tell you what you are trying to say.
  • 5. Marks versus comments Research showed that: • Only marks-no gain • Only comment scored 30% higher (average) • Marks and comment – cancel beneficial effects of the comments Research conclusion: If you mark or grade a piece of work, it means waste of time adding diagnostic comments.
  • 6. Comment only • provides students with a focus for progression instead of a reward or punishment for their ego (as a grade does). • should make it clear how the student can improve. • Plan activities and work with feedback in mind, let the design assist the process.
  • 7. Too many comments (Clarke,2001) • makes difficult for specific feedback to be given • Overwhelming and difficult to take in Clarke suggest that: When giving writing feedback, highlight 2 or 3 successes and 1 area where improvement is necessary
  • 8. Strategies for effective formative feedback
  • 9. Feedback sandwich 1. -Positive comment -Constructive criticism with explanation of how to improve -Positive comment 2. Contextual statement – I liked….because…. - Now - Next time… Interactive statement e.g. a question based on the work
  • 10. Allow student to act on feedback • Use lesson time to redraft work. • allow students time to focus on the feedback for improvement . • reinforce the value of the feedback and working in a supportive environment.
  • 11. Follow-up • time in the lesson to talk individually. • Have a written dialogue in the students’ book. • Use a comment tracker or target sheet to formalise the dialogue in a workbook Learning Journal • Create a learning journal in which they can reflect.
  • 12. Feedback summary Effective feedback to learners: • is best initiated by the learner • focuses on the learning intention of the task • occurs as the students are doing the learning • provides information on how and why the student understands and misunderstands • provides strategies to help the student to improve • assists the student to understand the goals of the learning.