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Analytical Essay
 

Analytical Essay

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    Analytical Essay Analytical Essay Presentation Transcript

    • The Analytical Essay “ The thing is, to put a motor in yourself.” Frank Zappa, Postmodern Composer DeCubellis
    • BENEFITS
      • Is extremely thorough and nearly fool-proof in “on-demand” testing situations.
      • Equips you with a ready-made, universally recognized, analytical structure that helps you to communicate your ideas clearly in an academic setting.
      • Allows for creative expression (e.g. in the title, introduction, and conclusion).
    • Snappy Title
      • One clever — but not cute— clause that includes the essay’s
      • TOPIC ,
      • AUTHOR ,
      • and TITLE of work you will be examining.
      • Helpful Devices to Make Your Titles “Pop”
      • Alliteration
      • Consonance
      • Assonance
      • Chiasmus
      • Paradox
      • Pun
      • Irony
      • Metaphor
      • Simile
      • Oxymoron
      • Understatement .
      • EXAMPLE:
      • Prejudice, Paternalism, and Pride
      • in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice
    • Snappy Title
      • P rejudice, P aternalism, and P ride in
      • Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice
      • Alliteration
      Author Title of work
    • Snappy Title
      • NOTE: Never underline your essay’s title. Do, however, underline the titles of longer works. Surround shorter works in quotation marks.
    • Snappy Title
      • Memory Hint: Use the mnemonic SPACE to remember which works belong in quotation marks:
      • S hort story titles
      • P oem titles
      • A rticle titles
      • C hapter titles
      • E ssay titles.
    • Snappy Title
      • Memory Hint: Use the mnemonic New England (NE) Map to “guide” you toward the works which belong in quotation marks:
      • N ovel and Newspaper titles
      • E pic poem titles
      • M agazine and movie titles
      • A lbum titles
      • P lay and Periodical titles
    • Your title MUST be Aligned with your Thesis
    • INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH Contains… Hook (Stinger) Thesis Pivot-Point Projected Organization Occa$ion
    • The INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH is
      • FUNNEL SHAPED
    • The INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH
      • Starts BROADLY by connecting with the audience.
      • Finishes NARROWLY by stating the essay’s thesis and upcoming “proofs.”
    • A Hook is…
      • One to three sentences that cleverly captures your reader’s attention.
      • Helpful Devices for Crafting Hooks
      • Question
      • Alliteration
      • Consonance
      • Assonance
      • Chiasmus
      • Paradox
      • Pun
      • Irony
      • Metaphor
      • Simile
      • Oxymoron
      • Understatement
      • Avoid false drama!
    • An Occa$ion consists of…
      • Several sentences that establish a relevant CONTEXT which hints at the potential personal payoff for reading your essay.
      • Examples
      • Anecdote
      • Celebrity appeal
      • Cultural commentary
      • Historical context
      • Etc.
      • Helpful Devices:
      • Baby-steps
      • Slo-mo
      • Dialog
      • Etc.
    • A Pivot-Point is…
      • ONE sentence that echoes back to the occasion and signals forward toward the thesis.
    • Pivot-Point
      • EXAMPLE:
      • Today’s comedians often cover their pain with humor, and similarly Stevie Smith’s poetry explores such contradictions between feelings and behaviors.
    • A Thesis is…
      • ONE sentence that “powers” your entire essay. It’s the essay’s motor.
      • It’s the point you are trying to prove.
      • In a thematic essay, your essay’s thesis is the literature’s theme.
    • Thesis
      • EXAMPLE:
      • Smith creates a paradox of a living death in “Not Waving But Drowning.”
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • ONE sentence that enumerates-- in the exact order you will later present them-- the “PROOFS” that support your thesis. Typically, you should use three proofs.
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • NOTE: Your PO MUST be written in grammatically parallel form.
      THESIS PROOF 1 PROOF 2 PROOF 3
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • Hamlet’s indecision causes his apparently contradictory thoughts , emotions , and actions .
      Parallel form: This PO is in the form of a string of nouns. EXAMPLE
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • Your PO may also be a string of phrases tacked to the beginning or end of your thesis sentence.
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • Be ing promoted , earn ing an advanced college degree , and winn ing the lottery ironically leads to Lumpy’s suicide.
      This PO is in the form of a string of gerund phrases.
    • Projected Organization (PO)
      • Three characters
      • Three stanzas
      • Three symbols
      • Three aspects of the literature’s theme
      • A character’s attire, behavior, and feelings
      • The setting, dialog, and imagery
      Samples of proofs you could use in your PO:
    • INTRO HOOK OCCASION PIVOT POINT THESIS PO PROOF 1 PROOF 2 PROOF 3
    • BODY SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3
    • BODY
      • Usually consists of three SECTIONS.
      • Sections are presented in the exact order stated in the PROJECTED ORGANIZATION.
      • Each section contains a TOPIC SENTENCE at its beginning which ties back to one segment of the PO.
      • Sections may contain more than one paragraph depending on how much supporting evidence you need to prove your point.
    • BODY PARAGRAPHS
      • Set up the quotation by providing a CONTEXT which contains only the 5W,H essential to clarifying the quotation.
      • You should assume your reader only has a passing familiarity with the text.)
    • BODY SECTION #1
      • Use additional, similarly structured paragraphs as needed by each body section.
      PROOF 1 TOPIC SENTENCE CONTEXT SET-UP CLINCHER QUOTE TRANSITION word, phrase, clause, or sentence ANALYSIS OF QUOTE
    • BODY SECTION #2
      • Use additional, similarly structured paragraphs as needed by each body section.
      PROOF 2 TOPIC SENTENCE CONTEXT SET-UP CLINCHER QUOTE TRANSITION word, phrase, clause, or sentence ANALYSIS OF QUOTE
    • BODY SECTION #3
      • Use additional, similarly structured paragraphs as needed by each body section.
      PROOF 3 TOPIC SENTENCE CONTEXT SET-UP CLINCHER QUOTE TRANSITION word, phrase, clause, or sentence ANALYSIS OF QUOTE
    • The CONCLUDING PARAGRAPH
    • The CONCLUDING PARAGRAPH
      • Starts NARROWLY by REPHRASING the essay’s thesis and “proofs.”
      • REVERSES the introduction’s PIVOT-POINT sentence.
      • States the PAYOFF by revisiting and completing the introduction’s OCCASION.
      • Finishes BROADLY by leaving the reader something profound to think about.
    • CONCLUSION THESIS REPHRASED PIVOT POINT REVERSED OCCASION COMPLETED FINAL CLINCHER PO
    • The CONCLUDING PARAGRAPH
      • PowerPoint ™ Presentation by Greg DeCubellis