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Erich Gunther - Enernex
 

Erich Gunther - Enernex

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Erich Gunther, CEO

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    Erich Gunther - Enernex Erich Gunther - Enernex Presentation Transcript

    • Smart Grid Boot Camp Erich W. Gunther Chairman and CTO EnerNex Corporation
    • Agenda
 •  10:30 – Welcome and Introduction (video 1) •  10:45 – Power System Overview - Smart Grid Conceptual Model •  11:15 – Smart Devices for the Smart Grid •  11:45 – Field Area Network Communications •  Noon – Enterprise Integration •  12:20 – Q&A •  12:30 – Adjourn / Lunch
    • Characteristics of the Modern Grid •  Enable active participation by consumers •  Accommodate all generation and storage options •  Enable new products, services, and markets •  Provide power quality for the needs of a digital economy •  Optimize asset utilization and operating efficiency •  Anticipate and respond in a self-healing manner •  Operate resiliently in disasters, physical or cyber attacks
    • Goals of this Workshop •  Introduce
non‐power
engineers
to
power
 systems
infrastructure
 •  Introduc5on
to
energy
infrastructure
 communica5ons
and
integra5on
 •  Provide
an
overview
of
the
key
technologies
 that
compose
a
typical
smart
grid
 •  Introduce
key
standards
that
will
underpin
the
 smart
grid
in
the
US
 •  Introduce
the
key
smart
grid
organiza5ons
 and
provide
a
pointer
to
involvement

    • IEEE Smart Grid Video
    • Agenda
 •  10:30 – Welcome and Introduction (video 1) •  10:45 – Power System Overview - Smart Grid Conceptual Model •  11:15 – Smart Devices for the Smart Grid •  11:45 – Field Area Network Communications •  Noon – Enterprise Integration •  12:20 – Q&A •  12:30 – Adjourn / Lunch
    • NIST Smart Grid Conceptual Model
    • Generation:
Primary
US
Energy
Sources
 –  51%
Coal
 –  21%
Nuclear
 –  17%
Natural
Gas
 Source: Energy Information Administration http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/pecss_diagram.html –  9%
Renewables
 –  2%
Petroleum

    • Transmission
Electricity
Highways
 Cmai Cana Nort 33 28 74 Mont 63 John Dall 72 68 Hayd Coro 9 2 Eldo 131 Fcng 7 Teva 111 WECC Reduced Model Lite 133 “Grid” Structure Source: http://www.nerc.com/fileUploads/File/ AboutNERC/maps/ NERC_Interconnections_color.jpg Source: Copyright © 1999 Aaron F. Snyder-Used with permission
    • Distribution:
Electricity
Roads
 Sink(s) Source Source (open) “Radial” Structure with presumed source and sink Simplifies protection design, conductor layout Source: Gerry T. Heydt, ASU, used with permission
    • Distribution:
Substation
Anatomy
 The substation is the transmission to distribution “interface” Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 14
    • Intelligently
Connecting
the
Utility
to
Customers
 •  Enable
Energy
Smart
Customers
 –  Integrated
information
from
utility
 –  Payment
options
(e.g.,
pre-payment)
 –  Outage
&
service
condition
information
 –  Support
rate
option
innovations
 •  Manage
Distributed
Resources
 –  Economic
dispatch
of
load
resources
 –  Dispatch
of
load
for
grid
management
 –  Intelligent
net
metering
 –  Management
of
distributed
energy
 resources
 •  Operational
Efficiencies
 –  Field
communication
links
to
distribution
 –  Revenue
cycle
improvements
 –  Situational
data
in
near
real-time
 –  Wholesale
-
retail
markets
integration
 •  Built
with
the
future
in
mind
 –  Upgradeable
WAN/HAN
communications
 –  Leverage
open
architecture
principles
in
 system
design

 –  Future
customer
service
offerings

 Source: Southern California Edison
    • Example
of
a
Sophisticated
Single
Residence
Building- integrated
Power
System
(BIPS)
 Fuel (propane) Recovered Heat 5 kW PV Array Master IC G 5 kW System Engine Generator Controller Ultra-capacitor DC Voltage Regulator and Storage bank Charging DC Bus AC Bus control Heat DC to AC recovery Inverter DC Loads Space Heating and Hot Water assist Heat Hot Potable Combination Air- Ducts Water High conditioning Unit, Heat Space Heat Water Efficiency Pump, Hot water heat Heat To Water Heater Heater/ Lighting Recovery System Storage Primary House Cooling Backup Burner Heat Pump Non-Usable Thermal Exhaust Based Clothes Fuel Dryer Fuel Backup Burner Additional House Cooling Source: Galvin Initiative
    • Source: NIST
    • North
American
Markets
 Source: FERC http://www.ferc.gov/industries/electric/indus-act/rto/rto-map.asp
    • Regions
and
Balancing
Authorities
 Source: NERC, used with permission http://www.nerc.com/fileUploads/File/AboutNERC/maps/NERC_Regions_BA.jpg 20
    • Example
of
Primary
Network
Micro-Grid
Suitable
for
Very
 High
Reliability
Applications
 HSPD = High Speed Heat District Heat Protection and switching Inverter Hospital (1 MW) Zone 1200 kW Small Device Business Fuel Cell Loads Under Stack 50 kW Each Primary Point of separation during micro-grid mode HSPD Heat HSPD Flow Substation HSPD 25 kW HSPD Wind HSPD HSPD 115 kV Bulk HSPD Utility Small Factory 4000 kW Supply HSPD Operated PV (1 MW) Ge Utility Owned 750 kW n Plant 13.2 kV ICE To Bulk Supply static switch HSPD Engin HSPD Control Center controller with e 13.2 kV Underground Islanding control Office Small Factory Communication Building (2 MW) (1.25 MW) and Control Link Central or Gen Heat Distributed 2500 kW Heat Control for Customer ICE Engine Owned PV 250 Micro-grids Storage Based kW (coordinates generation, power Stabilization quality, HSPD, loads and thermal Device energy) Source: Galvin Initiative 22
    • Example
of
Residential
Micro-Grids
 An efficient and reliable micro- grid doesn’t need to be large or overly complex. This could be several homes or several hundred homes – the generation & storage would simply be scaled to accommodate the load. Source: Galvin Initiative 24
    • Agenda
 •  10:30 – Welcome and Introduction (video 1) •  10:45 – Power System Overview - Smart Grid Conceptual Model •  11:15 – Smart Devices for the Smart Grid •  11:45 – Field Area Network Communications •  Noon – Enterprise Integration •  12:20 – Q&A •  12:30 – Adjourn / Lunch
    • Smart Devices for the Smart Grid Erich W. Gunther erich@enernex.com
    • 27

    • Dynamic Line Rating Methods 1.  Tension Monitoring 2.  Weather Monitoring 3.  Sag Monitoring 4.  Line Temperature Monitoring 5.  Thermal Rate Monitoring 6.  New Technologies 7.  Integrated Model
    • New Technologies EPRI Vision of advanced transmission line monitoring and sensors
    • Substation The substation is the transmission to distribution “interface” 30

    • Transformer Condition Assessment: Advanced Sensors Benefits –  Reduced cost Solid-state Gas-in-oil sensors Fiber-optic –  Online partial discharge On-Line Frequency detection –  Less data Response intensive Analysis –  More accurate On-Line LTC –  Improved Gas-in-oil and contact wear prediction 24/7 InfraRed monitoring Wireless Mesh sensors 3D Acoustic Emission UHF Partial Discharge defect location (Future Research)
    • Disconnect Temperature/Current Sensor Installation
    • RFID-type sensors (backscatter sensors)
    • Data collection from backscatter sensors Interrogator Antennas
    • Advanced Event Signature Analysis Waveform 1 Waveform 2
    • On Line Infrared systems
    • Field Data Access Architecture 1.  Enterprise Information Bus 2.  Generic Interface Definition (GID) 3.  IEC 61850 to CIM Translator 4.  Operational applications 5.  Real-Time Operations Bus 6.  Utility Identity Management 7.  Proxy & WAN Gateway 8.  WAN 9.  Cyber security 10.  Substation Gateway 11.  Substation LAN 12.  Substation IEDs 13.  Feeder IEDs 14.  Consumer devices 15.  Mobile work force
    • Challenges •  Tower of Babel –  Hundreds of communications methods – mostly proprietary, mostly insecure, mostly not scalable –  Even when standards based, there are multiple standards and few well defined information models •  Difficult to make the business case to integrate and interoperate –  A historical problem for substation automation –  Becoming easier for asset management – preventing a single large transformer failure can save millions
    • Motivation to Get it Right
    • Hot Topic Utility Applications •  General Conservation •  Minimize customer energy & carbon footprint •  Demand Management •  Grid Cost Reduction •  Grid Reliability & Stability Increase •  Demand Generation Avoidance •  Demand Consumption •  Build an Energy Information Economy •  Create a Home Energy Services Market •  AMI Tunneling and Submetering
    • Hot Topic Customer Applications •  Appliances that ‘Do the Right Thing’ •  Electric Usage Awareness & Understanding •  Consumption Behavior Modification •  Utility Program Participation •  Home Automation for Comfort and Conservation •  Integrating Solar & Wind at the Home •  Integrating PEVs & PHEVs •  Distributed Storage •  Many Others…
    • Smarter Devices •  Water Management –  Mange hot water production more intelligently –  Pool pump controls •  HVAC –  Smarter thermostats: comfort, efficiency and grid-aware •  Storage –  When appliances can’t or won’t shed, grid reliability can still be achieved. PEVs, big batteries, other. •  Lighting –  Tightly manage lights fixtures and natural light/heat sources •  Energy Management Home Automation Systems –  Portals, Displays, and Set Top Boxes •  Smart Appliances –  Coordinated, time, event, and price aware
    • Consumption Understanding •  Utilities Sell Electricity in many ways but have little concept of how individual customers use it •  Customers Use Products & Services… but have little concept of electricity use or value •  Products & Services use electricity… but have little concept of how and when to conserve •  Energy Services bridge the gaps by giving the customer the ability to meet demand requirements and personal goals regardless
    • Architecting Energy Services •  Access •  Connect energy services to energy consumers •  Understanding •  Help consumers understand usage •  Help consumers understand behavior •  Remediation •  Help a customer know what to do next •  Enable the next step •  Automate the next step?
    • Energy Service Experience •  Screw up the energy service experience, and: HAN devices end up in a drawer OR service phone calls are made AND Investment is Lost!
    • Agenda
 •  10:30 – Welcome and Introduction (video 1) •  10:45 – Power System Overview - Smart Grid Conceptual Model •  11:15 – Smart Devices for the Smart Grid •  11:45 – Field Area Network Communications •  Noon – Enterprise Integration •  12:20 – Q&A •  12:30 – Adjourn / Lunch
    • Erich
W.
Gunther
–
Chairman
and
CTO
 EnerNex
Corporation
 erich@enernex.com
 A
Focus
on
Requirements
and
Systems
Engineering

    • NIST
SG
Conceptual
Model

    • Smart
Grid
Communications
Ecosystem

    • Lots
of
Choices
   IEEE
802.xx
   IEEE
802.11
–
WiFi

   IEEE
802.15.1
‐>
Bluetooth
   IEEE
802.15.4
‐>
ZigBee
   IEEE
802.16
‐>
WiMax
   IEEE
802.yy
–
Other
wireless
   IEEE
802.11i
–
wireless
security
   GPRS
mobile
data
networks
   ISA
SP100
Wireless
Specifications
   Multiple
Address
Radio
Systems
(MAS)
   Proprietary
unlicensed
band
radio
systems
   IEEE
P1777
–
Recommended
Practices
for
Wireless
 Systems

    • Too
much
focus
on
the
tech
   Mesh
versus
p‐p,
p‐mp
   Licensed
versus
unlicensed
   802.15
versus
802.16
   IPv4
versus
IPv6
   Public
versus
private

    • Focus
on
the
applications
   Meter
reading
   Demand
response
   Distribution
automation
   feeder
device
status
polling
   Peer‐to‐peer
protection
schemes
   Substation
automation
   Control
house
to
in
yard
asset
sensors
   Substation
to
distribution
feeder
links
   Video
/
thermal
imaging

    • Widely
differing
requirements
   Bandwidth
   Latency
   Reliability
–
redundancy,
SPOF
   Manageability
   Security
+
privacy
   Environmental
hardening
   Cost
   Technology
longevity

    • One
size
may
not
fit
all
   No
fundamental
reason
that
one
network
 technology
has
to
be
used
to
form
the
field
 area
network
architecture
   The
application
requirements
including
 lifetime
management
should
dictate
   Example:
using
a
combination
of
WiMax,
 802.15g,
and
licensed
MAS
radio
may
be
an
 acceptable
solution
for
a
comprehensive
 application
deployment

    • Conclusions
   Focus
on
applications
and
their
requirements
   One
vendor/technology
may
not
be
sufficient
   Technology
will
change
–
plan
on
it
   Ensure
components
interoperate
   Ensure
you
can
manage
the
FAN
   Engineer
the
SYSTEM
not
the
TECH
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zB4‐mBQPd7k

    • Agenda
 •  10:30 – Welcome and Introduction (video 1) •  10:45 – Power System Overview - Smart Grid Conceptual Model •  11:15 – Smart Devices for the Smart Grid •  11:45 – Field Area Network Communications •  Noon – Enterprise Integration •  12:20 – Q&A •  12:30 – Adjourn / Lunch
    • Smart
Grid
Workshop
 Systems
Integration
 Erich
W.
Gunther
 Chairman
and
CTO
 EnerNex
Corporation
 erich@enernex.com

    • Today:
Building
Isolated
Systems
 •  Utilities
currently
tend
to
 Energy develop
intelligent
 Markets systems
in
isolation
 •  For
example,
AMR
and
 participation
in
energy
 markets
 •  Neither
project
is
typically
 developed
with
the
other
 in
mind.
 AMR
    • One-Off
Integration
 •  Integration
is
 Energy typically
done
 Markets after
the
fact
 •  Cost
is
 significant
 AMR
    • Doing
it
the
Next
Time
 •  Now
want
to
link
in
 new
systems
 Energy Outage •  Must
first
make
the
 Markets Management old
system
 expandable
 •  Then
must
do
 another
“one-off”
 integration
 AMR SCADA
    • And
again…
 Energy Outage Real-Time Markets Management Contingency AMR SCADA Protection
    • And
then
you
remember…
 Energy Outage Real-Time Markets Management Contingency Security AMR SCADA Protection
    • A
Better
Way:

Top-Down
Design
 •  Define
standardized
interfaces
first
 •  Incorporate
security,
network
 Energy management
and
other
strategies
 Markets right
from
the
beginning
 •  Initial
costs
are
a
bit
more
than
 one-off
integration,
but
not
much
 more
 Security •  New
applications
can
build
directly
 Network Management Data Management to
the
new
architecture
 AMR
    • A
Better
Way:

The
Next
Phase
 •  Can
re-use
the
 development
from
 Energy Outage the
first
phase
 Markets Management •  Expansion
was
 expected
 •  Adaptation
to
legacy
 Security Network Management systems
was
 Data Management planned
in
advance
 •  Overall
costs
much
 lower

 AMR SCADA
    • A
Better
Way:

And
so
on…
 •  Benefits
 INCREAS Energy Outage Real-Time Markets Management Contingency E
with
 time
 •  Opposite
 Security Network Management of
the
old
 Data Management way
 AMR SCADA Protection
    • NIST
Conceptual
Model
 Source: NIST 68

    • Smart
Grid
Data
Explosion
 New devices in the home enabled by the smart meter Annual Rate of Data Intake  800 TB 600 TB OMS Upgrade PCTs Come On-line RTU Upgrade 400 TB Mobile Data Goes Live AMI Deployment You are here. Distribution Management Rollout 200 TB GIS System Deployment Time  Substation Automation System Advanced Distribution Automation Workforce Management Project
    • Intelligent Industry
    • The
Methodology
 6
    • The
CIM
-
Common
Systems
Language
for
Utilities
 •  The
same
dictionary
is
 used
for
multiple
forms
of
 human
communication:
 –  Letters
 –  Phone
calls
 –  Conversations
 –  Emails
 –  Etc.
 •  In
similar
manner,
the
 same
CIM
is
used
for
 multiple
forms
of
 computer
communication:
 –  XML
 –  RDF
 One Dictionary –  OWL

 Supports Many Forms of Communication –  DDL
 –  Etc.
 72
    • AMI
Enterprise
Integration

    • Will it ever work together? •  How does one validate a real world end to end integration? •  How does one validate integration with many vendors? •  How does one validate usability and simplicity overall? •  How does one validate real world security? •  There are 3100+ utilities •  There are many regulatory, ISO and RTO models •  There is retail, wholesale, regulated and deregulated models •  There are Commercial, Industrial, and Residential models •  The need for standards and interoperability
    • The Smart Grid Labs (north campus) •  Scalability test equipment (meter to backend and multivendor) •  SCADA FEP, networks, cap banks, reclosers, switches, sensors •  7 AMI network vendors, 4 Meter vendors •  Multiple Appliance vendors (refrigerators, stoves, TVs, Washers, Dryers, Hot Water heaters), many In Home Displays, Gateways, Thermostats, etc. •  Many backhaul vendors (public, private) •  Many local premises network types (wired, wireless) •  Many backend systems (SAP, OMS, reporting, billing, etc.) –  Messages to devices –  Meter disconnects –  On Demand Reads
    • Conclusion
 •  Many
of
the
integration
standards
we
need
are
 already
there
(e.g.
the
CIM)
 •  There
are
different
needs
in
different
environments
 –  Define
new
applications
and
procedures
 –  Agree
on
common
information
models
 –  Create
define
new
protocols
 –  Develop
new
technologies
 –  Apply
systems
engineering
discipline
 •  Each
of
these
tasks
comes
with
a
cost
 •  Standards
provide
the
most
benefit
when
 implemented
frequently
and
pervasively
 •  Need
a
cost-benefit
analysis

 •  Which
are
the
easiest
to
justify
(LHF)?
 •  NIST
roadmap
leading
the
way

    • Thank
you!
 •  Questions!
 •  Further
questions
and
comments:
 –  erich@enernex.com
 77

    • Wrap-up Where to Learn More •  UCA International Users’ Group –  http://www.ucaiug.org •  International Electrotechnical Commission –  http://www.iec.ch •  Electric Power Research Institute –  http://www.epri.com •  IntelliGrid Consortium and Architecture –  http://intelligrid.epri.com •  IEEE Smart Grid –  http://smartgrid.ieee.org Copyright © 2010 EnerNex Corporation 78
    • Wrap-up Contact Information •  Erich W. Gunther EnerNex Corporation 620 Mabry Hood Road, Suite 300 Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone +1-865-218-4600, ext. 6114 erich@enernex.com http://www.enernex.com/staff/staff_erich.htm Copyright © 2010 EnerNex Corporation 79