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Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
Kings Place Festival 2010
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Kings Place Festival 2010

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  • 1. RT S C F O MP W R E N Y R U E C F D PO O LK F OOCONT SP O AL W OL K D & D OR A ORD L D MU DY BK CL JA Z D ARSIC C S SPAL W OL K & DR R AR RD E K O COMD & D MP O EN W RL DCOME RINKRY JA ART SIC CLUE SA SSICZ F OL T F O ONT EOK ENORL DCOME INK Y J W E R M D Z F O S A K O M M D CL K ENORL D DY RINK ARY ORD USICY BL CL A S Z F OOOD &NT EMP OK L WO COMD & D P OR WORD USICY BLU A B J A U S E E A OR WOR MUS LUE SCL A SS A Z Z RT F CON E S S IC AL L K CO DRINP OR AN WORL D M DY RINK RY J ART CON E A D IC O T P W M B A F T CL ARY JA ART CONSP OKIC AL F OL K OD &EMP O OK EN ORL EDY K CL ARY JARD A USIC LUE SCL A SSZ Z F O OODE UE SSIC Z Z F O T EM EN WWOR COM DRI R AR WO D M BLU SSIC Z Z RT F CON SP O IC AL L K S F U F ON SP O AL W OL K OD & P OR A ORD L D M EDY NK CLY JA ZRD A SIC E S S AL WOL K OOD T EMP K EN WO CO D & T EMP K EN ORL COM DRIN RY ART USIC BLUE A SS Z F ORT F CONTP OK E ORL COM & DR OR A WOR RL D R O R A W O D M E D Y K C J A Z Z F O CO N S S I C A L L K O O D E M P N W D M E D Y I N K R Y J D INK R Y R D US I B L A S F O D T E P O W CO & O R O U S I B C L A CL A JA Z ART C COLUE S SIC AOL K & DR MP OK EN ORL MED DRIN ARYRD ARC COLUE S A SSIZ Z S S I Z F F O N T E S P L W CO M I N K R A R W O R D M Y B K C J A Z T F N T E S P C A C A L O L O D M P O K E O R ED C Y U L M O K C & D OR N L D Y L A S JA ZD AR SIC CUE S L A SSI Z F O OOD & P ORK E WO O B S C LK RL D MED RINK ARY WORD MUS LUE S SIC A Z F OT F OOONT E P OK E AL W CO DRINAR MU Y B C L A J A Z Z A R I C C S P L WO L K C D & M P O N W O R M ED K S I C L UE S S F O T F O N T O K E R L O M D R R A O R L D Y B CO N S S I C A L L K O O D E M P N W D M E D Y I N K R Y D A M U S T E M P O K W O CO M & D O R A O R D U S I C B L U C L A J A Z Z R T F I C P OREN W RL D EDY RIN RY AR CO E S SSIC F O OO A R O R D M U B L UK C L J A Z T F O N T E M S P O A L L K C Y J S Z K W A Z Z ART IC COE S SA SSIC F OL OD & P OR EN W ORL K F OL F OO NT E P OK E AL W CO DRINARY ORD K C D & M P O N W O R M ED K C J A Z Z OM DR R A OR L D M Y B L A S EDY INK R Y D A U L U S I C BLU CL A JA Z Z RT FSIC C E S S E S S SIC F O O OD ON T SP O A L L K & E K EN W O CO M D R I W O R L D EDY R D MU A R SIC T F
  • 2. Praise for Kings Place Festival 2009 A big welcome... ‘ At Kings Place, the opening festival of the 2009–10 season was jubilant... who can fault ‘The Kings Place Festival provides a long-awaited opportunity to introduce the 9-12 September Kings Place Festival’10 a venue where instead of being told not to music we have so enjoyed Celebrating our third year, we are delighted to introduce over the years and the young touch the instruments, you are invited to a dazzling 100 performances, spread over four days. The musicians who have been so touch them gently? Between Mozart, Haydn exciting to work with.’ festival is a snapshot of where Kings Place is currently at, and Beethoven, Indian classical music and Levon Chilingirian s ketle with our open-minded approach to programming talented Tic sa a hog roast, it was difficult to know where performers of the highest quality. Offering a showcase of the ‘… one of the jewels in the best in classical, contemporary and experimental, jazz and ’ to turn. The Independent on Sunday cultural life of the capital … on ow blues, folk, spoken word and comedy, with tickets at just the acoustics of Hall One at Kings Place is one of the n £4.50 online – as well as many free events – our festival is accessible to all. Ahmed Dickinson Cardenas © Chris Tribble best I have ever encountered anywhere in the world.’ y Onl 0 Martino Tirimo There are far too many highlights to mention here but we have the Chilingirian Quartet teaming up with El Sistema’s most exciting ambassadors, the Millennium Quartet, for £4.5ne ‘State-of-the-art Kings Place a series of Latin American classics. Hot on the heels of the highly successful Darbar onli has as many echo-chambers festival we have a stunning voyage through Indian classical music. London Sinfonietta as a medieval cathedral, and cements their reputation once again with three boundary-pushing concerts of highly that’s just the foyer, so it was ambitious programming including Chamber Music by Thomas Adès. The Orchestra a pleasure to queue for one’s of the Age of Enlightenment showcase music from the great Baroque composers tickets while the five members including Purcell and Bach. Impressing audiences with their historical expertise and any of Il Suono delivered some forward-looking flair, these performances are not to be missed. M ee spirited Gabrieli.’ There’s a myriad of spoken word with Tilt and Magpie’s Nest, whilst comedy giants fr ts The Independent Tom Basden, Jenny Éclair and Rob Deering heat up the stage with some side-splitting, n razor-sharp delivery. Last year’s hugely popular Meet the Journalist makes a welcome eve ‘Kings Place … acoustically, return as the big guns from the Guardian let us in behind the scenes with lively debate it is very fine, and surrounding the most current issues in today’s media. atmospherically inviting…’ Dune Records jazz it up with Tomorrow’s Warriors, whilst F-IRE present Wot is Sunday Times Culture Jazz and Clowns Revisited, introducing those of all ages to the wonderful world of jazz. Red Orange explores the folk traditions with adventures from the international scene ‘Kings Place … a place where and, fresh from the overwhelming success of the first-ever London A Capella festival the curious can drop in at here at Kings Place, we are proud to see the artists back for a series of free events. lunchtime, tea time, after work Get contemporary as Arctic Circle take us on a cutting-edge journey through two or dinner time, just to see cities that represent the truest innovators in modern music, Manchester and Bristol, what’s going on. It’s for those whilst Twisted Lounge return with three unique performances that break the rules by who are equally happy with a defying all of the genres. guitar recital, a contemporary You must take some time out to relax and enjoy a coffee in the Green & Fortune Café, music event, a Beethoven grab a bite at the hog roast, whilst visiting the Farmers’ Market hosted by the Rotunda quartet or a platform debate Bar & Restaurant. The galleries also programme public art around the building, including about poetry in the city. That’s water sculptures by Pangolin London artist William Pye during the festival. very 21st Century.’ Financial Times Can’t wait to see you there! 1
  • 3. PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Thursday 9 & Friday 10 September No. TIME SPACE EVENT GENRE Latin American Classics I – Chilingirian Quartet & Millennium Quartet 1 2.30pm Hall One Song of the Black Swan – Villa-Lobos, Gardel, Ponce and Romero Classical AFTERNOON 2 3.45pm Hall One Jazzinho – Muños and Hahn Classical 3 5pm Hall One 4 Four Tango – Ponce, Piazzolla and Hahn Classical Classical Music from India – Darbar Arts Culture Heritage Trust 4 2.45pm Hall Two Hindustani Santoor Recital World 5 4pm Hall Two Carnatic Concert World 6 5.15pm Hall Two Contemporary Indian Classical Music World Meet the Journalist – Behind the Scenes at the Guardian 7 3pm St Pancras Room Roger Tooth – Head of Photography Spoken Word THURSDAY 9 8 4.15pm St Pancras Room Emily Bell – Director of Digital Content Spoken Word 9 5.30pm St Pancras Room Alan Rusbridger – Editor Spoken Word Spitz presents… 10 6.15pm Atrium FREE Indo Bass Trio Jazz 11 7.30pm Atrium FREE Indo Bass Trio Jazz In the English Tradition – curated by Alan Bearman 12 7pm Hall One Eliza Carthy Folk EVENING 13 8.15pm Hall One Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick Folk 14 9.30pm Hall One Chris Wood Folk London Sinfonietta 15 7.15pm Hall Two Chamber Music by Igor Stravinsky Classical 16 8.30pm Hall Two Chamber Music by Tom Adès Contemporary Classical 17 9.45pm Hall Two Postcards from Europe Contemporary Classical Tilt @ Kings Place Festival 2010 18 7.30pm St Pancras Room Spoken meets Live: a Spoken Word meets Live Art intervention Spoken Word 19 8.45pm St Pancras Room Spoken Word meets Comedy Spoken Word 20 10pm St Pancras Room London Liming: where Spoken Word meets Carnival Spoken Word Mikhail Rudy – Russian Masterpieces 21 2.30pm Hall One Seasons and Pictures – Tchaikovsky and Mussorgsky Classical AFTERNOON 22 3.45pm Hall One The Russian Cello – Prokofiev and Stravinsky Classical 23 5pm Hall One Petrushka – Stravinsky and Prokofiev Classical The Dune Music Company presents… Tomorrow’s Warriors 24 2.45pm Hall Two Tomorrow’s Warriors Biggish Band Jazz 25 4pm Hall Two Tomorrow’s Warriors Quartet Jazz 26 5.15pm Hall Two Myrna Hague + Gary Crosby’s Nu Troop Jazz The Magpie’s Nest: Once Upon a Time – curated by Sam Lee 27 3pm St Pancras Room Debs Newbold Spoken Word Contents 28 4.15pm St Pancras Room Jess Smith Spoken Word FRIDAY 10 29 5.30pm St Pancras Room Taffy Thomas Spoken Word Spitz presents… Festival ’10: Full 4-day Schedule 3 30 6.15pm Atrium FREE One Mint Julep Jazz 31 7.30pm Atrium FREE One Mint Julep Jazz Thursday Programme 7 Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment – Essence of Enlightment 32 7pm Hall One Buxtehude, Böhm, Bach Classical Friday Programme 21 EVENING 33 8.15pm Hall One J S Bach & the keyboard Classical 34 9.30pm Hall One Three Violins – Music from Purcell’s London Classical Saturday Programme 35 Comedy at Kings Place – in association with Avalon 35 7.15pm Hall Two Tom Basden Comedy Sunday Programme 55 36 8.30pm Hall Two Jenny Eclair Comedy © Morley von Sternberg 37 9.45pm Hall Two Rob Deering Comedy Exhibitions in the galleries 74 38 7.30pm St Pancras Room Folk Made in the UK – curated by Red Orange Nick Wyke and Becki Driscoll Folk / Contemporary 39 8.45pm St Pancras Room Monster Ceilidh Band Folk / Contemporary Festival Food and Drink 78 40 10pm St Pancras Room Andrew Cronshaw and Tigran Aleksanyan Folk / Contemporary 2 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 3
  • 4. PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Saturday 11 September PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Sunday 12 September No. TIME SPACE EVENT GENRE No. TIME SPACE EVENT GENRE Light and Dark – Johannes Moser & Sophie Cashell Gould Piano Trio 41 11am Hall One Light – Beethoven, Janácek and Messiaen ˇ Classical 71 11am Hall One Bohemian Rhapsody – Suk & Dvorák ˇ Classical MORNING MORNING 42 12.15pm Hall One Dark – Bach, Takemitsu and Beethoven Classical 72 12.15pm Hall One Variations in a major key – Beethoven & Brahms Classical Endymion Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment - Kids 43 11.15am Hall Two For Anton Stadler – Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A Classical 73 11.15am Hall Two Workshop Family 44 12.30pm Hall Two For Richard Mühlfeld – Brahms Clarinet Quintet in B minor Classical 74 12.30pm Hall Two Concert: Our Favourite Things Family F-IRE presents… Kids F-IRE Kenneth Hamilton - The World of the Romantic Pianist 45 11.30am St Pancras Room Wot is Jazz? Family 75 11.30pm St Pancras Room A Fantasy on Rossini’s Moses – Thalberg Spoken Word / Classical 46 12.45pm St Pancras Room Clown Revisited Family 76 12.45pm St Pancras Room A Fantasy on Bellini’s Norma – Liszt Spoken Word / Classical A Cappella at Kings Place A Cappella at Kings Place 47 1pm Foyer FREE In The Smoke Contemporary 77 1pm Foyer FREE Voice Contemporary 48 2pm Foyer FREE Diversity Choir Contemporary 78 2pm Foyer FREE Chantage Contemporary 49 3pm Foyer FREE Evolution Contemporary 79 3pm Foyer FREE Evolution Contemporary Junk Band – curated by Philip Venables & Serge Vuille Junk Band – curated by Philip Venables & Serge Vuille AFTERNOON AFTERNOON 50 1.45pm Foyer FREE Rubbish Music Contemporary 80 1.45pm Foyer FREE Rubbish Music Contemporary Latin American Classics II – Chilingirian Quartet & Millennium Quartet Sacconi Quartet with Simon Crawford-Phillips 51 2.30pm Hall One David Carpio’s Octet – Ginastera and Carpio Classical 81 2.30pm Hall One A Quintet for Clara – Schumann Piano Quintet in E flat Classical SATURDAY 11 52 3.45pm Hall One Bachianas Brasileiras – Villa Lobos and Carreño Classical 82 3.45pm Hall One Hard-won masterpieces – Brahms Piano Quintet in F minor Classical SUNDAY 12 53 5pm Hall One Last Round – Villa-Lobos, Plaza and Golijov Classical 83 5pm Hall One Dumka and Dancing – Dvorák Piano Quintet in A ˇ Classical Outer Circle: Bristol – Curated by Arctic Circle International Guitar Foundation 54 2.45pm Hall Two Rozi Plain Contemporary 84 2.45pm Hall Two Stefan Galt Contemporary 55 4pm Hall Two Eyebrow Contemporary 85 4pm Hall Two Amanda Cook Classical 56 5.15pm Hall Two François & The Atlas Mountains Contemporary 86 5.15pm Hall Two Nicolas Meier Trio Jazz Poet in the City: Contemporary Lines Royal Academy of Music 57 3pm St Pancras Room Maps Spoken Word 87 3pm St Pancras Room A Sea of Tonality: Debussy, Satie and Takemitsu Classical 58 4.15pm St Pancras Room Bodies Spoken Word 88 4.15pm St Pancras Room Pastiche, politics and all that jazz: Stravinsky, Weill and Eisler Classical 59 5.30pm St Pancras Room Communications Spoken Word 89 5.30pm St Pancras Room Elegiac Harp: Ravel, Bax, Debussy Classical Spitz presents… Spitz presents… 60 6.15pm Atrium FREE Rosanna Schura Trio Jazz 90 6.15pm Atrium FREE Indo Bass Trio Jazz 61 7.30pm Atrium FREE Rosanna Schura Trio Jazz 91 7.30pm Atrium FREE Indo Bass Trio Jazz Folkworks: Tradition and Innovation – curated by Kathryn Tickell Outer Circle: Manchester – Curated by Arctic Circle 62 7pm Hall One John Kirkpatrick Folk 92 7pm Hall One Nancy Elizabeth Contemporary EVENING EVENING 63 8.15pm Hall One Jonny Kearney and Lucy Farrell / The Askew Sisters Folk 93 8.15pm Hall One Homelife Contemporary 64 9.30pm Hall One Nancy Kerr and James Fagan Folk 94 9.30pm Hall One Denis Jones Contemporary F-IRE presents… Dante Quartet 65 7.15pm Hall Two Tom Arthurs Trio with the Elysian Quartet Jazz 95 7.15pm Hall Two Fiery Franck Classical 66 8.30pm Hall Two Kit Downes Trio Jazz 96 8.30pm Hall Two The harlequin colours of Debussy Classical 67 9.45pm Hall Two Basquiat Strings Jazz 97 9.45pm Hall Two Late Fauré Classical Twisted Lounge presents… Spitz Blues 68 7.30pm St Pancras Room Loré Lixenberg Contemporary 98 7.30pm St Pancras Room JD Smith Blues 69 8.45pm St Pancras Room Breathe – curated by John Butcher Contemporary 99 8.45pm St Pancras Room John Crampton Blues 70 10pm St Pancras Room Physicality – curated by D Toop, J Bissmire and L Michener Contemporary 100 10pm St Pancras Room Parkbench Blues 4 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 5
  • 5. Thursday © Morley von Sternberg highlights 2.30pm The Festival opens with the Chilingirian Quartet joining forces with the Venezuelan Millennium Quartet for a dazzling programme of South American chamber music by Villa-Lobos and Romero. 2.45pm, 4pm, 5.15pm Darbar takes you on a musical journey through India, from the shimmering sounds of the ancient santoor in the foothills of the Himalayas, to Indian strains of instruments more familiar in a Western orchestra. Beautiful, strange and compelling. 5.30pm Alan Rusbridger, Editor of the Guardian, takes to the podium as part of the popular Meet the Journalist series. Book early, this fascinating talk will sell out quickly! 8.15pm Legendary folk duo Martin Carthy and Dave Swarbrick are back! Huge names on the folk world for four decades, their performance is as lively and inspirational as ever. 8.30pm London Sinfonietta: Thomas Adès Chamber Music spatial surprises and beguiling music from The Tempest by one of Britain’s leading composers. 6 7
  • 6. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Latin American Classics I © Graham Topping Chilingirian Quartet / Millennium Quartet 1 Song of the Black Swan On the Chilingirian Quartet’s first visit to Hall One 2.30pm Latin America they met Villa-Lobos’s widow Heitor Villa-Lobos String Quartet No. 2 (1915) in Brazil, who gave them the music for his Carlos Gardel Por Una Cabeza 16th Quartet. The distinguished British- Manuel Ponce Estrellita based quartet have since made many visits to Heitor Villa-Lobos O Canto do Cysne Negro South America, where they have encountered Aldemero Romero Fuga con Pajarillo Jazzinho 2 4 Four Tango 3 its unique multiplicity of cultures and Chilingirian String Quartet enjoyed meeting a variety of composers Millennium Quartet Hall One 3.45pm Hall One 5pm Levon Chilingirian violin and performers. In January 2010 they were Stephen Coombs piano Reynaldo Hahn Violin Sonata Manuel Ponce Sonatina for violin and piano © Graham Topping charged with developing a Chamber Music Reynaldo Hahn Nocturne Astor Piazzolla 4 Four Tango Academy in Venezuela, for the young players Composed in 1915, Villa-Lobos’s Second Improvisations on Latin American Music Reynaldo Hahn Piano Quintet String Quartet is an early example of a José Luis Muñoz Jazzinho involved in El Sistema, the world-renowned genre that attracted him throughout his life Chilingirian String Quartet orchestral-training organisation. (he composed 17 of them in all) and reveals Chilingirian String Quartet Levon Chilingirian violin For Kings Place Festival they have the early Romanticism and the influence of Millennium Quartet Stephen Coombs piano French music on the Brazilian master. Charles Sewart violin chosen to share the platform with one of O Canto do Cysne Negro (Song of the Black Stephen Coombs piano Manuel Ponce’s Sonatina for violin and piano El Sistema’s most exciting ambassadors, Swan), though it may sound echt-Brazilian, is a beautiful example of his gentle and the Millennium Quartet, whose players was arranged in 1917 from an orchestral work Born in Caracas of a Venezuelan mother temperate neo-classicism, and also reflects based on Greek mythology, the symphonic and German father, Reynaldo Hahn spent the influence of Paul Dukas, with whom he the Chilingirian have coached. Says Levon poem Naufrágio de Kleônicos (1916). Manuel his career so completely in France (where studied in Paris. Astor Piazzolla is celebrated Chilingirian: ‘The Kings Place Festival Ponce, often called ‘the father of Mexican he moved with his parents at the age of 3) as the great master of Argentinian tango, but provides a long-awaited opportunity to music’, combined Impressionist and neo- that he’s generally thought of as a French 4 for Tango, composed in 1982, is also his first classical influences picked up in Europe with composer. As well as composing songs, string quartet, and a virtuoso application of introduce the music we have so enjoyed over an interest in Mexican folk-music and an operettas and film music, he managed to be the full range of 20th-century string textures the years and the young musicians who have innate lyric talent, shown to perfection in the the lover of Marcel Proust and the friend and (sul ponticello, ‘Bartók-pizzicato’, harmonics, been so exciting to work with.’ popular Estrellita, often used as an encore. biographer of Sarah Bernhardt. His Violin glissandi, rapping on the wood with the Singer-songwriter-filmstar Carlos Gardel, Sonata of 1926 is, typically for him, sunny and knuckles etc, as well as traditional playing who died in a plane crash in 1935 at the lyrical, full of discreet charm and nostalgia techniques) to a very sophisticated stylisation height of his fame, is one of the legends of the for more gracious times, even when it is being of the popular dance rhythm. Short, pithy, Chilingirian Quartet development of tango in Argentina (though sprightly. It could almost be very superior and dark-hued, it makes the perfect foil to Levon Chilingirian violin he claimed he was Uruguayan, and was salon music, but with an infusion of the Reynaldo Hahn’s imposing yet delightful Ronald Birks violin born in France!), and creator of the tango- urbanity and grace of Fauré. Piano Quintet in F sharp minor of 1922. This Susie Mészarós viola canción. The Venezuelan pianist-composer José Luis Muñoz (1928-1982) is credited work breathes the spirit of Gabriel Fauré, Philip De Groote cello Aldemero Romero was a prolific composer with being the first Venezuelan composer to who was one of Hahn’s teachers at the Paris in many styles, including Caribbean popular adopt the 12-tone method, but many of his Conservatoire. Millennium Quartet music and jazz. He created the Venezuelan works attest to his fascination with jazz styles, Lucid and civilised, this is music that Ollantay Velásquez violin style known as Onda Nueva (New Wave), such as Jazzinho (the title denotes ‘small, harks back to the more spacious and Miguel Nieves violin influenced by the Brazilian Bossa Nova. sweet’ jazz) for piano and string quartet. comfortable days before World War I, yet Jesús Pérez viola The highly rhythmic (and almost Bachian!) does so with wit and sobriety, especially Valmore Nieves cello Fuga con Pajarillo comes from a suite for in the opulently tender slow movement strings composed in 1975. The pajarillo is a (reminiscent of the operettas of Messager) Venezuelan dance, something like a waltz but and the vigorous and joyous finale. with the accent on the second of the three left to right: beats. Notes by Malcolm Macdonald Chilingirian String Quartet, Millennium Quartet 8 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 9
  • 7. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER WORLD Classical Music from India Darbar Arts Culture Heritage Trust Darbar takes you on an Indian musical journey, introducing instruments relatively new to Indian classical music. We begin in the foothills of the Himalayas with the shimmering sounds of the santoor, the hundred-stringed instrument from the valleys of Kashmir. This ancient instrument is the Indian version of the hammered dulcimer. The second concert takes us to the deep Hindustani Santoor Recital Carnatic Concert Contemporary Indian south, and unusually features the violin as a Hall Two 2.45pm Hall Two 4pm Classical Music solo instrument, supported by percussion. Hall Two 5.15pm Harjinder Pal Singh santoor Jyotsna Srikanth violin We end our journey back in the north, with Manjeet Singh Rasiya tabla Neyveli Venkatesh mridangam Jesse Bannister saxophone an instrument we would usually associate R N Prakash ghatam Bhupinder Chaggar tabla Harjinder Pal Singh with Western jazz – the saxophone. Harjinder Pal Singh’s interest in music began Jyotsna Srikanth Jesse Bannister in his childhood, and his father sent him to Trained in the South Indian Carnatic and Jesse Bannister plays North Indian classical learn tabla from Bhai Labh Singh Ji of the Western classical genres, Jyotsna composes music on the saxophone. His exciting music Punjab Gharana at the age of 14. He also her own music and collaborates with jazz, demonstrates how the saxophone can be mastered the Pakhawaj style of tabla, and Western classical and world music artists. ‘as sweet and mellifluous as a flute at times later became a senior disciple of maestro ‘She provided a remarkable, improvised and at others, as powerful and direct as a Pandit Shiv Kumar. Harjinder travels widely instrumental, switching between rapid-fire Shehnai’ (Amrita Review in Los Angeles, of in India giving concerts, lectures and violin ragas and slower delicate pieces and Jesse Bannister), adding a new dimension to demonstration programmes in schools and some impressive interplay between the India’s contemporary classical repertoire. colleges. He also tours abroad. percussionists.’ (Guardian, April 2010). Bhupinder Chaggar this page, from top: Manjeet Singh Rasiya Neyveli Venkatesh Bhupinder is a leading disciple of tabla Harjinder Pal Singh, Manjeet Singh Rasiya Manjeet is one of the UK’s greatest Indian Neyveli gave his first mridangam maestro Pandit Sharda Sahai Ji. He teaches opposite, clockwise from top right: Jesse Bannister, Bhupinder Chaggar, percussionists, and a fine Latin and Afro- performance at the age of ten. He is skilled tabla to jazz students as well as tabla classes, R N Prakash, Neyveli Venkatesh, Cuban drummer. As well performing with in playing the difficult ‘gumuki’ style and and works with musicians from many cultures, Jyotsna Srikanth renowned Indian musicians and on theatre is adept in kanjira konnakol, the art of including flamenco guitarist Eduardo Niebla, © Arnhel de Serra and film he has played with Western performing percussion syllables vocally. Portuguese percussion maestro Rui Júnior, musicians, including Jarvis Cocker, Marianne Neyveli has accompanied frontline musicians and soul singer Jocelyn Brown. Faithfull and Beth Orton. in many major Indian music festivals and has toured extensively. R N Prakash R N Prakash is a disciple of Vidvan K N Krishnamurthy of Bangalore. His fusion work with Western pop and jazz groups, especially Massive Attack, illustrates the musical bridges he builds to other cultures. He has made many television appearances demonstrating the versatility of mridangam and ghatam. 10 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 11
  • 8. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER SPOKEN WORD FREE IN THE ATRIUM JAZZ EVERY DAY FREE IN THE ATRIUM JAZZ Meet the Journalist Indo Bass Trio © Tom Bland Thursday 9 September Behind the Scenes at the Guardian & Sunday 12 September Atrium 6.15pm & 7.30pm Manjeet Singh Rasiya tabla This series of events features key personnel Ben Hazleton double bass from the Guardian, whose offices are here at Clem Alford sitar Kings Place. Featuring Head of Photography Indo Bass Trio explores the relationship Roger Tooth, Director of Digital Content of rhythm and melody as an energetic Emily Bell and Editor Alan Rusbridger, these flow between musicians, instruments and talks will give you a glimpse of life behind the listeners. The double bass, well versed in jazz and groove, enters the Indian soundscape to headlines. Essential for anyone interested explore sonic possibilities. Microtones within in the challenges and opportunities facing tones create zones for the rhythm inside the today’s media. rhythm of a heartbeat. © Felix Clay © Linda Nylind / Guardian One Mint Julep Friday 10 September Atrium 6.15pm & 7.30pm Emine Pirhasan vocals Jim Hart drums Fred Thomas double bass Sam Crowe keyboards Led by vocalist Emine Pirhasan, One Mint Julep is a new quartet. It is made up of four of London’s most talented musicians who have come together to rediscover the classic sound 7 8 9 of jazz and blues from the early Thirties. Emine simultaneously evokes the sound of the Thirties’ smoky jazz clubs with contemporary influences. Roger Tooth Head of Photography Emily Bell Director of Digital Content Alan Rusbridger Editor Spitz presents… in Kings Place Atrium each day – FREE! Rosanna Schura Trio St Pancras Room 3pm St Pancras Room 4.15pm St Pancras Room 5.30pm Saturday 11 September What is a picture desk? How does it choose Emily Bell set up MediaGuardian.co.uk in Alan Rusbridger has been editor of the Atrium 6.15pm & 7.30pm from the staggering 20,000 pictures submitted 2000, and is now responsible for the award- Guardian since 1995. His editorship has been The Atrium series will include the much-loved Spitz Jazz every day? How does it deal with readers’ winning guardian.co.uk, the Guardian and notable for pioneering the development of which has had a residency at Kings Place every Friday Vocalist and songwriter Rosanna Schura draws Observer’s network of websites. Emily also influences from artists such as John Martyn to reactions to the editors’ more controversial the paper’s digital edition, and for launching night since 2008. These sessions have showcased many of create her unique sound and subtle approach decisions? Roger Tooth gives a fascinating writes regular columns on media policy the paper in the popular European ‘Berliner’ insight into the images behind the news. His issues. Today she shares her views on some format in 2005. He is also noted for fighting, London’s finest jazz players, including some of the old Spitz to vocal jazz. Her beautiful vocals weave talk will be illustrated throughout with some aspects of news on the web in today’s world. and winning a number of high-profile legal favourites. We will also be crossing musical borders with the together with piano and bass accompaniment. Her voice rises above sprawling jazz sounds, great news and feature photography. cases involving free speech issues and Indo Bass Trio who present you with rhythms as new as they and, with impeccable phrasing, brings out the corruption in government. are old. humour and hurt of jazz and blues classics. 12 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 13
  • 9. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER FOLK In the English Tradition © Chris Tribble © John Haxby Curated by Alan Bearman Music 13 This fantastic evening of concerts brings together no less Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick than four of English folk music’s most influential and popular Hall One 8.15pm performers: Eliza Carthy, Martin Carthy, Dave Swarbrick and A reunion of the legendary groundbreaking Chris Wood. Not to be missed. These concerts will sell out duo. For more than 40 years Martin Carthy very fast, so book now! has been one of folk music’s greatest innovators, and Dave Swarbrick’s contribution to folk-rock music through Fairport Convention is legendary. 12 © John Haxby ‘The super-duo are back ...’ The Guardian ‘Swarbrick is an absolute revelation… as Eliza Carthy instinctively sympathetic and wickedly inspirational as he ever was. It’s like they Hall One 7pm were a couple of twenty somethings again. To hear Swarb bowing with such soul Nominated for Singer of the Year, Best Album and tenderness and dynamism too is an and Best Original Song in BBC Radio 2 Folk unconditional joy.’ fRoots Awards 2009, Eliza Carthy is an extraordinary singer and fiddle player. Dazzlingly gifted, she is one of the most impressive and engaging artists of her generation. ’One of the figureheads of the English folk revival … compelling’ Evening Standard ‘A gloriously natural singer’ Q magazine 14 Chris Wood Hall One 9.30pm Singer of the Year and Best Album, BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards 2009, Chris Wood is an uncompromising songwriter whose music reveals his love for the unofficial history of the English-speaking people. With gentle intelligence he weaves the tradition with his own contemporary parables. His writing has been said to share the same timeless quality as Richard Thompson at his best. ‘Chris Wood has developed into an exceptional songwriter... venturing into areas that few © Dominique Secret artists would dare tackle.’ Guardian clockwise from top: Martin Carthy, Dave Swarbrick, Chris Wood, Eliza Carthy 14 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 15
  • 10. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL / CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL London Sinfonietta 17 Thomas Adès © Maurice Foxall s es n gr Co of ry ra L ib London Sinfonietta, one of the world’s Postcards from Europe y© sk v in elite contemporary music ensembles, will Hall Two 9.45pm ra St or Ig surprise and stimulate in a showcase Régis Campo Pop-Art of modern chamber music from across Osmo Tapio Räihälä Damballa Europe. Following from this summer’s Sinfonietta Shorts by Gerald Barry, Luke Bedford and Jonathan Harvey spirited Experiment! week at Kings Place, the London Sinfonietta Sinfonietta bring three programmes which encapsulate its reputation for virtuosity, London Sinfonietta is a partner in the Re:New Project, in which 22 ensembles across Europe are exchanging pieces of music to broaden ambitious programming and pushing the reach of composers from different countries. In this event, London boundaries: the first gives us Stravinsky’s Sinfonietta will perform two very attractive and exciting pieces in exuberant Duo Concertante and the gleeful the presence of the composers. Marseille-born Régis Campo studied with Gérard Grisey and Henri Dutilleux. Pop-Art for flute, clarinet, comedy of his Suite Italienne from Pulcinella. violin, viola, cello and piano was composed in 2002. In Räihälä’s music Next up is the chamber music of Thomas Chamber Music by Igor Stravinsky Chamber Music by Thomas Adès influences from rock and jazz are skilfully woven into his own style. Adès, one of the brightest stars in 21st- Damballa, written for the Uusinta Chamber Ensemble, is scored for century music, with a programme that Hall Two 7.15pm 15 Hall Two 8.30pm 16 flute, clarinet and violin, with the oboist joining them near the end. For over 40 years, London Sinfonietta has played a crucial role highlights his theatricality and inventive Duo Concertante Programme to include: in the creation and performance of contemporary music. Sinfonietta Three pieces for solo clarinet Catch use of space in writing for small groups. Suite Italienne Court Studies from The Tempest Shorts is a series of commissions by leading composers in celebration of the ensemble’s 40th anniversary. Each piece is scored for a small Postcards from Europe is given over to the group of performers, or soloist. After the works’ first performance, work of living composers from across Europe, London Sinfonietta London Sinfonietta Sinfonietta Shorts are available to download for free from the London the result of London Sinfonietta’s partnership In 1930 Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was introduced to the violinist Born in 1971, British composer Thomas Adès is ‘one of the most Sinfonietta website, giving musicians across the world an opportunity to play the pieces. This concert showcases new Sinfonietta Shorts by with the European Union’s Re:New Project, Samuel Dushkin, who became a great friend and recital partner. imposing figures in contemporary music’ (The New Yorker). His the British composers Luke Bedford (b. 1978), Jonathan Harvey (b. 1939) in which 22 ensembles exchange pieces of Inspired by Dushkin’s playing, Stravinsky wrote several works for the compositions range from large-scale operas to intimate chamber and Irish composer Gerald Barry (b. 1952). violinist including his Violin Concerto No. 1, the Suite Italienne (based works, but each is distinctive for their intricate sound tapestries and music to broaden the reach of composers on pieces from Pulcinella) and the large-scale Duo Concertante (1931). elaborately patterned textural layers. Visit www.londonsinfonietta.org.uk for all the latest news from the outside their own nation. Also featured Formed of five distinct movements, the music of this Duo ranges from Catch (1991) is Adès’s first chamber piece: a short, humorous work ensemble, and to find out how you can own a Sinfonietta Short. are London Sinfonietta Shorts, miniature the tranquil pastorale to episodes with a more angular, aggressive for violin, cello, clarinet and piano, with an improvisatory nature, the character. The final movement, Dithyrambe, features some of the most lively nature of the game ‘catch’ depicted by numerous syncopated ‘birthday cards’ commissioned to celebrate lyrically expressive music the composer ever wrote. rhythms and apparently arbitrary entrances. The work structures itself Notes by Carenza Hugh-Jones its 40th birthday in 2008. Three Pieces for clarinet (1918) was dedicated to the tea millionaire, around various combinations of the four instruments, with a stationary and amateur clarinettist, Weiner Reinhart, who financially supported piano trio taunting and teasing the clarinettist, who refuses to join the several of Stravinsky’s struggling concert series. The colourful pieces game – but who eventually joins in with a burst of jubilantly expressive ‘As the world panics and looks for safe are among the first works in which Stravinsky experimented with music. havens for its money, it’s good to see the incorporating aspects of jazz, describing them as ‘written-out portraits Court Studies from The Tempest (2005) is scored for the same four London Sinfonietta aren’t losing their nerve.’ of improvisations’. instruments as Catch. Written as one continuous movement, the work Suite Italienne (1932) is a set of six movements for cello and piano, is formed from six solo numbers taken from Adès’s highly acclaimed Daily Telegraph based on music from Stravinsky’s earlier Neo-Classical ballet Pulcinella. opera The Tempest and freely transcribed for the four instruments. His starting point was a set of 18th-century pieces by (in some cases The pieces depict the leading figures from The Tempest arriving on wrongly attributed to) Pergolesi. The work opens with two movements Prospero’s island, with the music conjuring up a rarefied, mysterious – one high-spirited, one a sombre aria – taken from the start of the world. The work ends with a spine-chilling final section, which ballet, while the remaining idiosyncratic movements, all twists on ultimately fades out with a mesmerising solo violin phrase. recognisable Baroque forms, come from the end of the work. 16 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 17
  • 11. THURSDAY 9 SEPTEMBER SPOKEN WORD Tilt @ Kings Place Festival 2010 hi H ab s lly Al- Curated by Melanie Abrahams, arts entrepreneur and producer © Sa Tilt presents three infectious evenings of entertainment, stimulation and wordplay, with events that show how spoken word can complement, rub against and enhance other art forms – on this occasion live art, comedy and carnival. The first evening features brand new commissions of writing and performance by live artist, writer and filmmaker Robin Deacon. Next comes stand-up and satire by Francesca Martinez and Tim Clare. The finale is a welcome return of last year’s popular ‘London Liming’ – a carnival of poetry, music and © Lyndon Douglas © Dave Guttridge audience participation. It features perfectly-formed short bites of poetry, commentary and song by wordsmiths Mellow Baku, Luke Wright, Charlie Dark, Laura Dockrill and Zena Edwards. 20 Spoken meets Live: 18 pros and cons of life coaching and self-help. London Liming: where Laura Dockrill is a poet and illustrator from South London cited as ‘one of the Top 20 Luke Wright has been described as ‘the best young performance poet around’, (Observer) a spoken word meets Francesca is an award-winning comedian spoken word meets carnival who has toured internationally with sell-out hot faces to watch for 2009’ (Elle). She has and ‘visceral, poignant and riotously funny’ live art intervention St Pancras Room 10pm performed all over the UK on radio and TV (The Scotsman). He is host and curator of runs at the Melbourne Comedy Festival, the St Pancras Room 7.30pm including Radio 1 and Newsnight, and at Latitude’s Poetry Arena and a resident poet on Edinburgh Festival and the prestigious Just For Luke Wright, Laura Dockrill, Zena Edwards, Laughs Festival in Montreal. She recently made festivals including Glastonbury, Latitude Radio 4’s Saturday Live. His Valentine’s Day Robin Deacon Charlie Dark, Mellow Baku her Adelaide Fringe debut and has received and Reading and has supported Kate Nash, special on Channel 4 attracted over a million rave reviews literally all over the world. She is Martha Wainwright and Phil Jupitus. Author viewers. His debut collection is called High Artist, writer and filmmaker Robin Deacon Mellow Baku weaves rich musical a regular face on TV and well-known for her of Mistakes in the Background and Ugly Shy Performance. offers live performance, performed lecture, prose relating stories of transformation, starring role in Ricky Gervais’s Extras. She is Girl, she is writing a book of poems and short journalistic and documentary approach mixed consciousness and relationships. From currently working on her BBC sitcom pilot and stories. She is curator of the groundbreaking Zena Edwards is a poet and performer who with humour and satire. musical beginnings in a commune where developing a feature documentary. Word Orchestra and this year is writing and uses song, movement and global influences A former artist in residence at she learned songwriting and guitar, she directing a show, launching her greetings as a jump-off for her words. She fuses poetry Sophiensaele in Berlin and Robert Wilson’s is inspired by the messages of conscious How To Be A Leader card range, Snatches, and performing a debut and music, incorporating traditional African- Watermill Center, New York, his current Reggae, the ethos of Jazz, and experiences written and performed by Tim Clare children’s show, Glue Mouth. instruments (kalimba and kora) and digital projects include a documentary film on the of personal faith. She has worked with many technology to create her own sound tracks for life of late US American performance artist artists including Jean ‘Binta’ Breeze and Here in the future, we are all leaders. We poems and stories and has performed world- Michie One, at venues including the Barbican, 19 Stuart Sherman. Robin is an Associate Artist wide. She has written, performed and toured exercise our power in hundreds of small Jazz Café, North Sea Jazz Festival and the of Artsadmin and a Senior Lecturer in Drama acclaimed one-woman shows including decisions every day: I will ‘Like’ this link to an Knitting Factory in New York. and Performance Studies at London South Spoken Word meets Comedy Aztec Camera video. I will add 09 to vote for Security and Broken Words, and produced Bank University. work for BBC radio and short films for Sky St Pancras Room 8.45pm Bryan. But we are leaders without a manifesto. Charlie Dark is a dynamic writer, producer, DJ That is about to change. Revolutionary political Digital. She has produced two CDs, entitled and performer specialising in poetry and the How To Be A Leader – Leaders – love them, thinker and comedian Tim Clare unveils a guide Healing Pool and Mine 4 Life. communication of stories. With a reputation loathe them, want to be like them? showing us what the tyrants of the past can teach for fusing the boundaries of wordplay, music Two performances of electrifying stand-up, us about conning, coercing and cajoling people and imagery he has instigated and hosted Melanie Abrahams Recipient of a ‘Women to satirical lecture and scurrilous speech written into doing our bidding. Say no to democracy! numerous music and word happenings Watch 2010’ award for her work in literature and performed by Francesca Martinez and Embrace the Dao of Fractal Despotism! including Blacktronica at the ICA, Rice and and the arts, Melanie Abrahams has been the Tim Clare. Tim is a writer, stand-up poet and musician Peas and activities for the Red Bull Academy. vision behind a number of groundbreaking described as ‘shrewd and funny’ (The Scotsman). He is founder of the urban Nike-supported spoken word projects. She has developed If I Were The World’s First Wobbly Leader… His memoir, We Can’t All Be Astronauts, won running club Run Dem Crew and continues to initiatives to support writers and producers, written and performed by Francesca Martinez Best Biography/Memoir at the East Anglian Book perform and DJ actively. and has founded two companies over ten years, Awards. He has performed his work on BBC2, renaissance one and Tilt (Spoken Word Pioneer, Cited as ‘the fastest-rising female comic in Radio 1, 2, 4 and 6, and presented the Channel 4 C4). She curates, writes and presents actively clockwise from top right: from top: the country’ (Observer) Francesca Martinez series How To Get A Book Deal. Melanie Abrahams, Zena Edwards, Laura Dockrill, and is developing a new spoken word festival. Tim Clare, Francesca Martinez, Robin Deacon explores leadership in our daily lives, and the Mellow Baku, Luke Wright www.ontilt.org. 18 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 19
  • 12. Friday highlights 2.30pm Russian pianist Mikhail Rudy brings two exciting programmes of orchestral music transcribed for highly virtuosic pianist, including Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Return for music from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet and Rudy’s own hair-raising piano version of Stravinsky’s ballet Petrushka at 5pm. 5.15pm Myrna Hague, universally known as Jamaica’s First Lady of Jazz, showcases her stunning and highly distinctive vocals alongside Gary Crosby’s Nu Troop – an all-star line-up from award-winning independent label, Dune Records. 5.30pm Come and be spellbound by storyteller Taffy Thomas, the first-ever Storyteller Laureate, as he beguiles his audience with stories, tales (and elaborate lies!) woven from folklore, myths, epic tales, travellers’ lore and more. 7.15pm Tom Basden’s innovative comedy offers a multi-talented treat of quirky goodness. Think Flight of the Conchords meets David Shrigley and you are halfway there. 8.15pm Two fine soloists, Jonathan Manson and Steven Devine (Orchestra of the Age of the Enlightenment) present a delectable programme of music for viola da gamba and harpsichord by J S Bach. 8.45pm Get entertained, energised and electrified with the © Keith Paisley Monster Ceilidh Band and their outrageously funky grooves that mix elegant traditional playing with raucous rave-like rhythms. 20 21
  • 13. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Mikhail Rudy © Marthe Lemelle © New Zealand TV1 Russian Masterpieces The charismatic pianist Mikhail Rudy is Petrushka 23 well known for his creative programmes, Hall One 5pm Prokofiev 8 Visions fugitives, Op. 22 whether it be his dramatisation of The Pianist Prelude in COp. 12 No. 7 or collaboration with the jazz pianist Misha 3 pieces from Romeo and Juliet: Scene, Juliet as a young girl, Alperin in Double Dream. He’s also a world- Montagues and Capulets Stravinsky Petrushka class virtuoso, capable of encompassing (transcription Stravinsky/Rudy) huge orchestral works on the piano, as we will witness in his arrangement of Mikhail Rudy piano Petrushka and performance of Mussorgsky’s Prokofiev made his international reputation as a pianist-composer, monumental Pictures at an Exhibition. In an alchemist of brilliant keyboard miniatures, sometimes caustic, these concerts, Rudy delves into his Russian sometimes tender or sentimental. 20 of these make up the Visions fugitives (1915-17), pieces meant to suggest the highly concentrated 21 22 past. As he says, ‘Being Russian myself essence of a kaleidoscope of moods, each just a minute or so long: but living a great part of my life in the West, Seasons and Pictures The Russian Cello musical epigrams that stand in for unheard epics. The ballet Romeo Russian music is for me a constant emotional Hall One 2.30pm Hall One 3.45pm and Juliet, by contrast, enshrines the far more expansive and genuinely romantic style of the later Prokofiev, and contains some of his best- link, a way of keeping Russia alive inside Tchaikovsky The Seasons (extracts) Prokofiev Cello Sonata loved melodies. We hear three numbers from the set of ten that me.’ He is joined in his second concert by his Mussorgsky Pictures at an Exhibition Stravinsky Suite Italienne Prokofiev himself arranged for piano. compatriot the cellist Alexander Ivashkin, a Mikhail Rudy piano Alexander Ivashkin cello Stravinsky’s ballet Petrushka originated in the sound of the piano, for he originally conceived it as a Konzertstück for piano and orchestra. musical tour de force in his own right, being a Mikhail Rudy piano In his memoirs, he recalled it all began with his having ‘a distinct soloist, conductor and Professor of Music at Tchaikovsky’s The Seasons ought to have been called ‘The Months’, for picture of a puppet, suddenly endowed with life, exasperating the the complete cycle contains 12 pieces each named for a month of the Stravinsky’s Suite Italienne (1932) is an arrangement of an arrangement of the University of London. year and each written to accompany lines from a poem on that month an arrangement. In it – with the help of the great cellist Piatigorsky – he patience of the orchestra with diabolical cascades of arpeggios’. He himself arranged three dances from the ballet for solo piano at by a different poet. Published as the musical supplements to a St transcribed a violin-piano suite he’d made in 1925 of movements from his the behest of Arthur Rubinstein, so the logic of Mikhail Rudy’s own ‘Rudy is a pianist with an enormous musical Petersburg monthly journal from January to December 1876, they were ballet Pulcinella (1919-20), itself founded upon a collection of 18th-century transcription is unimpeachable. In its combination of folksong and intended to be within the capabilities of amateur pianists, but have pieces by (or rather, often, wrongly attributed to) Pergolesi. Stravinsky appetite… an intrepid explorer’. Gramophone sufficient subtleties to interest real virtuosi, too. Their formal simplicity, does everything he can to upset the four-square Baroque phrasing by urban melodies with daring harmonic and rhythmic experiment, this is Stravinsky at his most subversively brilliant, as well as his great tribute coupled with the programmatic imagery, was a spur to Tchaikovsky’s means of displaced accents, prominent syncopations, changes of time- to St Petersburg. As Rudy writes, ‘I completed this suite to make the invention: many of them remind us of his genius as a ballet composer, signature, and so on. His rather Cubist re-ordering and re-imagining of entire Petrushka less driven by the idea of pianistic tour de force than and it’s easy enough to imagine a ballet constructed around their the Baroque melodies and harmonies are taken a stage further when by the desire to tell the story of the love, jealousy and ultimate death of sequence of varied moods and characters. transferred to cello and piano, creating a kind of conscienceless neo- a piece of wood, the puppet Petrushka, by the means of another piece Unlike The Seasons, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition is a classicism, like a burlesque of Pergolesi’s own sonatas. of wood, the piano.’ visionary work and the sound of a modern Steinway is almost not Prokofiev’s Cello Sonata is a late work, written in the dark days enough for the range and richness of the colours required, hence after February 1948, when the composer (along with Shostakovich) had Notes by Malcolm Macdonald the many orchestrations. A grand memorial to his friend, the painter been denounced by Stalin’s henchman Zhdanov for writing ‘formalist, Viktor Hartmann, it takes the form of Mussorgsky himself (a portly bourgeois decadent, anti-people music’. Though ill and depressed, figure represented by a ‘Promenade’ in ponderous 11/4 time) viewing Prokofiev felt that to be ‘working, always working’ would be his ten pictures in a memorial exhibition of Hartmann’s work which was personal salvation in this situation, and he was quick to spot the talent held in 1874. The sharp delineations of character and colour, vividly of the young Mstislav Rostropovich and to write a work especially for rendering scenes and personalities, created a new manner of writing him. Though it does not have the barbaric dissonance of his middle- for the piano which was hardly understood for over 50 years, while period works, its combination of aching lyricism and spiky virtuosity is the monumental finale – ‘The Great Gate of Kiev’ – is one of the most authentic Prokofiev. There is a defiant youthfulness to this music, rather majestic culminations in piano literature. than the spirit of elegy, encapsulated in his preface quote from Gorky: left to right: Mikhail Rudy, Alexander Ivashkin ‘Man, how proud the word sounds!’ 22 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 23
  • 14. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER JAZZ The Dune Music Company presents © Janine Irons Tomorrow’s Warriors 24 26 ‘If you want to know where the real heart, soul and energy Tomorrow’s Warriors Myrna Hague + Gary Crosby’s of the resurgent UK jazz scene is, look no further than Gary Biggish Band Nu Troop Crosby’s Dune posse.’ bbc.co.uk Hall Two 2.45pm Hall Two 5.15pm Dune Music presents members of the Myrna Hague vocals The Dune Music Company Ltd incorporates the world-class, Tomorrow’s Warriors Biggish Band, an Gary Crosby double bass/bandleader exciting London-based band set up for those Mark Crown trumpet award-winning independent jazz label Dune Records, young musicians aged between 14 and 19 Denys Baptiste tenor saxophone dedicated to supporting the unique artists on its roster. that are inspired by jazz’s black musical Andrew McCormack piano Tomorrow’s Warriors is a leading organisation for the heritage. The afternoon begins with unique Rod Youngs drums arrangements by Tomorrow’s Warriors of provision of high-quality jazz education and professional classic jazz standards, trawling through the Myrna Hague is known universally as artist development. Since its formation in 1991, the archives of the truest in jazz sensibility, and Jamaica’s First Lady of Jazz. Her stunning organisation has maintained a track record of success in finishing with a massive jam session. This is a and highly distinctive vocals make a very not-to-be-missed showcase for the rising jazz welcome Kings Place debut. She performs developing award-winning young jazz artists of excellence, stars of tomorrow. alongside Gary Crosby’s Nu Troop, featuring providing firm foundations on which they can build and sustain successful careers in the music industry. 25 an all-star line-up led by Crosby, a stalwart of the UK jazz scene on the award-winning independent label, Dune Records. Performing new arrangements of classic jazz standards Tomorrow’s Warriors Quartet Myrna Hague exudes elegance, sophistication © Ben Amure and style. Hall Two 4pm Formed in 1991 by bassist Gary Crosby, Nu Troop’s format is based upon Art Blakey’s Jazz ‘The cream of young British talent.’ Time Out Messengers, providing a means to introduce ‘The most promising recent jazz arrivals.’ new jazz talent to the world circuit. This latest Guardian incarnation of Nu Troop is without doubt the finest ensemble in the UK playing jazz in Binker Golding tenor saxophone the African-American tradition. It features a Alex Ho piano superlative line-up of award-winning artists, Gary Crosby double bass all of whom are bandleaders in their own right. Eddie Hick drums By virtue of the artists’ individual touring schedules, the collective have only been able Tomorrow’s Warriors hits the stage again at to come together for a limited number of Kings Place with the Tomorrow’s Warriors shows throughout the year, so don’t miss this Quartet – a fresh new ensemble featuring rare opportunity to see them live. some of the brightest rising jazz stars of the future. The session follows in the footsteps of previous editions, which have included award-winning stars Soweto Kinch, Denys Baptiste, Jason Yarde, Andrew McCormack and ensembles including J-Life, Empirical and recently launched Rhythmica. This latest collective injects a bright, contemporary sound into their music, whilst staying true to Tomorrow’s Warriors’ legacy for the jazz ur e tradition. Am left to right: Tomorrow’s Warriors, Gary Crosby, en Binker Golding ©B 24 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 25
  • 15. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER SPOKEN WORD The Magpie’s Nest – Once Upon a Time… © Tom Bland Spellbinding Storytelling Storytelling is the oldest oral art. Many, many years ago, when the only form of communication was by word of mouth, stories were the sole means of education and spreading news. They taught who we were, where we came from, how we should treat each other. Storytelling encompasses a vast heritage of lore, myths, epic tales, folk tales and travellers’ tales; tales of the creation of the world, tales of its destruction; sagas of gods and men; all the great traditional legends from around the world. These stories are not learned by rote or read from books but retold by the tellers, making each interpretation unique. Kings Place is delighted to bring you its first Festival storytelling series – you will be spellbound. Curated by Sammy Lee 28 Jess Smith © Alan Hinton © Derek Schofield St Pancras Room 4.15pm Jess Smith was raised in a large family of Scottish travellers. ‘I have been a gatherer of tales for most of my life, and I suppose it all began when I was a wee girl. I shared a home with parents, seven sisters and a shaggy dog. It could be said that I lived a different sort of life from most other children, because ‘home’ was an old blue bus.’ Acclaimed for 27 her autobiographical trilogy, Jessie’s Journey, Jess is on a mission to pass on the stories she heard as a girl. ‘If you are aged from around 29 10 going on 100, then you’re a fine age to Debs Newbold enjoy and hopefully remember forever these Taffy Thomas St Pancras Room 3pm ancient oral tales of Scotland’s travelling St Pancras Room 5.30pm people... imagine that, as my friend, you Debs burst out of Birmingham armed with are by the campfire listening to the magical Taffy Thomas has just been appointed as a bucketload of stories and songs from Scottish stories that have been handed down the first-ever Storyteller Laureate, and has her Anglo-Irish family, a dirty laugh and a through generations of travellers.’ an MBE for services to storytelling and way with an audience. Quick-witted and charity. He has an astonishing repertoire of charismatic, Debs can enthral 55-year-olds more than 300 stories, tales (and elaborate and charm five-year-olds (often at the same lies!) collected mainly from traditional oral © John Lindsay / Perths Picture Agency time), command an audience of 1,000 at sources, which he is happy to tell in almost Shakespeare’s Globe and warm the hearts any situation. Who knows which ones he will of even the most jaded, rain-sodden festival regale us with! goers. Debs is the first ever Storyteller-in- Currently artistic director of Tales in Residence at Cecil Sharp House, home of the Trust, the Northern Centre for Storytelling in English Folk Dance and Song Society. Grasmere, Taffy has appeared at the National Storytelling Festival in the USA, the Bergen Arts Festival in Norway and a Blue Peter Prom at the Royal Albert Hall. 26 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 27
  • 16. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Essence of Enlightenment Three distinctive and engrossing short Buxtehude, Böhm, Bach 32 programmes performed and devised by Hall One 7pm principal players from the Orchestra of the Dieterich Buxtehude Praeludium in G minor, BuxWV 163 Age of Enlightenment and showcasing music Georg Böhm Suite No. 2 in D from great Baroque composers including J S Bach Italian Concerto in F, BWV 971 © Jane Hilton Purcell and Bach, as well as gems from Steven Devine harpsichord lesser-known composers such as Böhm and Locke. The players from this orchestra 34 Dieterich Buxtehude, long-time organist of the Marienkirche in the are renowned for their historical expertise, north German city of Lübeck, left a substantial body of keyboard music. His Praeludium in G minor for organ without pedals, although J S Bach & the keyboard Hall One 8.15pm 33 Three Violins – Music from Purcell’s London Hall One 9.30pm virtuosic abilities on period instruments commonly called ‘Prelude and Fugue’, in fact contains three short, and forward-looking flair in performing contrasting fugues (the second with perhaps coincidental pre-echoes J S Bach Nicola Matteis Divisions in D minor of Handel’s Messiah), framed and separated by quasi-improvisatory and communicating. fantasia sections. Sonata for viola da gamba and harpsichord in G, BWV 1027 Thomas Baltzar Pavan and Galliard in C Sonata for viola da gamba and harpsichord in D, BWV 1028 John Jenkins Fantasia in F for two trebles and bass Georg Böhm, organist of the Johanniskirche in Lüneburg for Sonata for viola da gamba and harpsichord in G minor, BWV 1029 Nicola Matteis Fantasia for solo violin many years, probably knew both Buxtehude and Bach. His Suite in D Matthew Locke Fantasia in C from The Broken Consort major is a keyboard imitation of the popular Franco-German form of Jonathan Manson viola da gamba Henry Purcell Pavan in G minor, Z780 the orchestral dance suite, beginning with a substantial French-style Steven Devine harpsichord Fantasia: Three Parts on a Ground, Z731 Overture, and ending with an unusual Chaconne which uses a whole selection of stock bass patterns, repeating each a few times then The viola da gamba or bass viol, with its wonderfully rich resonance, Matthew Truscott, Alison Bury, Catherine Mackintosh violins moving on to the next. was the only member of the Renaissance viol family in regular use Jonathan Manson viola da gamba Bach included a similar ‘Overture after the French manner’ in throughout the Baroque period. Bach’s three sonatas for it were Steven Devine organ/harpsichord Part II of his Clavierübung (Keyboard Re-creation), published in 1735 – written, or adapted from existing works, during his later years in alongside the ‘Concerto after the Italian Taste’. This uses the contrast Leipzig. Rather than the usual shorthand continuo accompaniment, The thriving musical life of Restoration London attracted many foreign between the two manuals of the harpsichord to suggest a soloist they have keyboard parts which are fully written out almost throughout composers and performers. Among them was the German violinist standing out from an orchestra in the brilliant outer movements, and – so that they are effectively trio sonatas, with melodic parts of equal Thomas Baltzar, whose Suite in C major for three violins and continuo in the central Andante to allow the floridly ornamented melody to sing importance for the gamba and the harpsichordist’s right hand, over the introduced to England a popular northern European scoring – though out over its ostinato accompaniment. bass line in the left hand. The First Sonata is indeed a version of an its opening Pavan and Galliard are dances in the English tradition. © Jane Hilton earlier Trio Sonata for two flutes and continuo. The same instruments are used in the Divisions, or variations, over a This Sonata has the shape of the Baroque sonata da chiesa, or repeating ground bass by the Neapolitan violinist Nicola Matteis, who, ‘church sonata’, with four movements, alternately slow and fast; the as his solo Fantasia suggests, must have been an outstanding virtuoso. two fast movements are both fugal in texture. The Second has a similar John Jenkins wrote chiefly in the native English tradition of the outline, but the quick movements are more freely conceived, with hints fantasia in several sections for viol consort; but the lively writing of his of the up-to-date ‘galant’ style, and in the finale an episode of brilliant Fantasias for two trebles and a bass (completed by 1650) seems more keyboard figuration. The Third Sonata, by contrast, has the fast–slow– suited to violins than to viols. His younger colleague Matthew Locke fast form, and in the outer movements the ritornello structure and added keyboard continuo to this trio sonata scoring, and followed a rhythmic drive, of a Vivaldian concerto – but is it an adaptation or an fantasia with a series of dances, in each of the six suites that he wrote imitation? in 1661 for the King’s private ‘Broken Consort’. The great Henry Purcell contributed two early works to the repertoire for three violins and continuo: a Pavan, possibly written in memory of Jenkins; and a set of variations for ‘Three Parts on a Ground’ of fertile invention and great contrapuntal ingenuity. Notes by Anthony Burton 28 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 29
  • 17. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER COMEDY Comedy at Kings Place in association with Avalon With a long history in distributing the highest quality comedy acts, Avalon, in association with Kings Place, brings you three unique comedy giants. Tearing up the stage, whilst tickling 37 your funny bone into complete submission, Tom Basden, Jenny Eclair and Rob Deering give you a showcase of what Rob Deering goes on at Off With Their Heads! our regular Thursday night Hall Two 9.45pm of comedy at Kings Place. So if humorous discourse is your ‘As sharp and versatile as a Swiss Army knife… thing, then miss these at your peril. one of the best performers currently on the circuit.’ The Independent © Avalon UK 35 This man is guaranteed to induce the hardest 36 of chuckles with his abundant on-stage enthusiasm, huge cheery likeable face, and Tom Basden Jenny Eclair comprehensive knowledge of the absolutely © Noel McLaughlin useless. Not to mention his legendary guitar Hall Two 7.15pm Hall Two 8.30pm playing. The hugely talented Rob Deering has cemented his reputation as one of the UK’s ‘Marvellous’ Evening Standard ‘… warm, exuberant and energetic …’ finest stand-ups, taking six solo shows to the This is Leicestershire Edinburgh Festival, headlining major comedy Tom Basden’s innovative new brand of clubs throughout Britain and taking part in comedy genius offers a multi-talented treat Comedy folklore suggests that Jenny Paramount Comedy’s Edinburgh and Beyond of quirky goodness. Think Flight of the Hargreaves acquired her stage name Eclair, live tour. Conchords meets David Shrigley and you are whilst pretending to be French at a Blackpool In 2008 Rob returned to the Edinburgh halfway there. Subtle heartfelt songs about nightclub. Eclair gained notoriety in the 1980s Festival with his brand new solo show Boobs. being an ant and a werewolf sit alongside as a punk poet noted for her hard-drinking, Late last year he began hosting Comedy ditties about winning Who Wants to Be chain-smoking, tough-talking, and highly Congregation, a monthly night of serious a Millionaire, ghosts and being haunted. energetic persona. Bringing her own brand of laughs, impromptu music and sinful good His truly oddball material is original, well girl power to the comedy circuit she was the times in Soho’s glamorous Madame Jojo’s delivered and raises the biggest of laughs. first female ever to win the coveted Perrier which drew the biggest headliners from the Tom took last year’s Edinburgh Fringe by Award. With considerable TV form she trained comedy circuit. storm, winning the First Award 2009 with as a straight actress, appearing in Holby City his inventive delivery, guitar playing, photo and The Bill. A plethora of other appearances stories and ingenious little drawings. He also include the Grumpy Old Women series, won If.Comedy Best Newcomer (2007) and was Grumpy Guides, Grumpy Holidays and It’s © Avalon UK nominated for Chortle’s Best Breakthrough Grim up North. She also played a woman of Act and Best Full Show. forty plus in Al Murray’s Multiple Personality Disorder. Co-writer and star of Grumpy Old Women Live, her two-hour stage show extravaganza played to packed audiences in the UK and Australia, whilst her latest show Because I Forgot to Get a Pension continues to tour. Her West End credits include Steaming, Mum’s the Word and The Vagina Monologues. An enthusiastic writer she contributes to various newspapers and magazines and is left to right: Tom Basden, Jenny Eclair, Rob Deering currently working on her third novel. 30 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 31
  • 18. FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER FOLK / CONTEMPORARY Folk Made In The UK © Jamie Orchard-Lisle For this series of Festival concerts, Red Orange audience and arts development have chosen three different approaches to folk music from the UK: interpretations of traditional English tunes and songs; happy, non-stop, danceable Gaelic © Jamie Orchard-Lisle folk/roots/world music; and new folk adventures based on international explorations. All three are rare London appearances. Opening the evening are acclaimed north Devon fiddle/viola duo Nick Wyke and Becki Driscoll. They are followed by the cheerful, high-energy, Newcastle-based Monster Ceilidh Band, on 40 Andrew Cronshaw and only its second performance in London. And closing the Tigran Aleksanyan night is multi-instrumentalist and musical explorer Andrew St Pancras Room 10pm Cronshaw, with the unforgettably poignant sound of Tigran Aleksanyan’s duduk. Andrew Cronshaw is one of only two artists ever to have been nominated in both the BBC Folk Awards and BBC Awards for World Curated by Red Orange Music, for his last album Ochre. For this show 38 39 he plays a deep-chiming electrified chord zither, ‘marovantele’ (his unique hybrid of Finnish kantele and Madagascan marovany), the huge breathy Slovak flute fujara, the seductive Chinese ba-wu and more. His Nick Wyke and Becki Driscoll Monster Ceilidh Band © Andy Fish partnership with Tigran Aleksanyan, St Pancras Room 7.30pm St Pancras Room 8.45pm Armenian master of his country’s exquisitely soft-toned reed instrument, the duduk, Nick Wyke and Becki Driscoll are highly This is a Ceilidh with a difference! creates a mesmerising duo. respected musicians and composers. They Outrageously funky grooves from a first collaborated as a fiddle duo on a busking Newcastle-based four-piece who mix quirky ‘This man is an English original. He paints trip around Spain and Portugal. Since then, tunes with beats and attitude. Elegant unusual sound pictures with the melodies they have made a strong impact on the traditional playing mixed with raucous rave- we love and brings out totally unexpected British folk scene and received national and like rhythms that are guaranteed to entertain, aspects of them.’ The Folk Diary international acclaim. energise and electrify. This performance Their passion for English traditional brings a new breed of Ceilidh dancing to ‘In a just world, a man with the talents of music and the violin has led to the generations new and old all over the world. Andrew Cronshaw would be a household development of their unique style. Becki’s name. Cronshaw is a musician/producer of melodic, emotive violin and viola blend with ‘The coolest Ceilidh band around.’ rare quality. Don’t worry about categorising Nick’s driving fiddle chords and powerful Kathryn Tickell this album as folk, classical, world or any vocals to create a rich, captivating sound. other kind of music – just file under Essential.’ Mel McClellan, BBC ‘Lovely, inventive playing’ fRoots ‘Passionate musicality and distinctive presence’ The Living Tradition ‘A superb advert for English music’ The Folk Mag 32 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 33
  • 19. Saturday highlights 11.15am The inimitable Endymion ensemble preface a performance of Mozart’s famous Clarinet Quintet with K, an intriguing meditation on its opening bars by composer and artistic director Phil Venables. 12.15pm Johannes Moser is a formidable young German cellist making a name on the international circuit. He is joined by pianist Sophie Cashell, BBC2’s Classical Star winner, for a highly original exploration of ‘Darkness’ featuring music by Bach, Beethoven, Takemitsu and an improvisation with Nintendo Wiimote. 1.45pm Junk Band play Steve Reich (Free in the Foyer) 3.45pm Massed cellos from the Royal College of Music join the Chilingirian and Millennium Quartet cellists for a performance of Villa-Lobos’s magnificent Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 for soprano and orchestra of violoncelli. A sound once heard, never forgotten! 2.45pm, 4pm, 5.15pm Arctic Circle presents the best of Bristol’s talent in three exciting contemporary concerts. 7pm Folk giant and instrumental virtuoso John Kirkpatrick plays and entertains royally with traditional songs, a whole array of the ‘squeezeboxes’ he is renowned for – and of course his own inimitable humour. 7.30pm Twisted Lounge offers you a unique and exciting © Morley von Sternberg soundclash – a stunning set of air vibrations where modern classical piano improvisations and beautiful vocals meet hard-edged techno and rich electronica. 34 35
  • 20. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Johannes Moser & Sophie Cashell © IMG Artists Light and Dark The young German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser came to the world’s attention when he won the famous Tchaikovsky Cello Competition in 2002. He has since performed as a soloist with the world’s great orchestras, and also made a name as a chamber musician, inspirational educator and exponent of the electric cello. He is joined by pianist Sophie Cashell, winner of BBC2’s Classical Star competition (2007) for two contrasting programmes exploring core works of the cello repertoire mixed with live improvisation on electric cello and Nintendo Wiimote. 41 Both e-cello works will be created using strands from the other works on the programme through improvisation. Moser will take feelings and themes from each piece to create a link 42 from one work to the next, as he explains: ‘I would like to share my experiments of the past few months with the electric cello, and show that work-in-progress against pieces that have been in my repertoire for years. I feel more and more that these pieces are subject to subtle Light Dark Hall One 11am Hall One 12.15pm improvisations constantly, keeping the music fresh and alive. I am very pleased to be working with Sophie since she really knows the repertoire inside out and is a very keen spirit herself.’ Beethoven Sonata for piano and cello in C, Op. 102 No. 1 J S Bach Sarabande from Suite No. 5 in C minor, BWV 1011 Janácek Pohádka for cello and piano ˇ Toru Takemitsu Orion Messiaen Louange à l’éternité de Jésus Beethoven Sonata for piano and cello in D, Op. 102 No. 2 light for e-cello, music box and Nintendo Wiimote dark for e-cello, prepared piano and vocoder voice Johannes Moser cello Johannes Moser cello Sophie Cashell piano Sophie Cashell piano Beethoven’s two late Sonatas (from 1815) are characterised by brevity, For the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, J S Bach’s fifth suite compression and the incredible ingenuity of the mature composer. was simply ‘darkness’. Written for a cello with its top A string tuned The first, in C major, Beethoven named a ‘free’ sonata, his way of down to G, it is the most shadowy and mysterious of the Suites, with accounting for its unconventional design. It opens with deceptively this Sarabande forming a still point, its measured, falling phrases, gentle simplicity before plunging into its stormy A minor Allegro unwinding with their extraordinary chromatic logic into the void. For vivace. From out of a dreamily rhapsodic, recitative-like Adagio bursts a some, this eloquent aria of pain represents nothing less than the spirited, Haydn-like Finale in which the instruments play an exuberant Crucifixion. game of cat-and-mouse. Janácek’s twinkling Pohádka (A Fairy tale) ˇ Toru Takemitsu combined a Japanese sensibility with Western evokes the magical Russian tale of Prince Ivan and his love for Maria, techniques inspired by Debussy, Webern, Messaien and Cage. Orion, daughter of the King of the Underworld. Drawing on folk song and named after the constellation, is a chamber version of the first delightful dance rhythms, it follows the lovers’ trials and enchantments movement of his cello concerto, Orion and Pleiades. Moser recalls leading to their eventual happy union. meeting Takemitsu’s long-time recording producer, who explained Louange à l’Éternité de Jésus is a movement from Messaien’s that his tempi markings were related to the Japanese Qi, which means Quartet for the End of Time, written while he was a prisoner in breathing. ‘So however a performer decides to breathe this music will Stalag VIII-A during the Second World War. Inspired by the Book of determine the tempo.’ © Manfred Esser-Haenssler Classic Revelation, this magnum opus, composed for musicians available Beethoven’s Sonata in D for piano and cello was to be his last in in the camp, was given its premiere before 5,000 shivering inmates the form. The first movement, with its jubilant rising arpeggio, is driven on 15 January 1941. In this movement of mesmerising serenity, the by optimism and vigour, in sharp contrast to the sombre Adagio, and its cellist plays a long, sustained cantilena over slowly shifting, pulsating memorably dark-hued chorale. The work ends with a muscular fugue, harmonies on the piano. A glowing meditation praising the eternal love which takes us back to Bach. of Jesus, it is essential Messaien, while prefiguring a whole wave of Minimalist music that would blossom in the late 20th century. Notes by Helen Wallace 36 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 37
  • 21. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER FAMILY Endymion 43 F-IRE presents For Anton Stadler Kids F-IRE Hall One 11.15am Phillip Venables K, a prelude to Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet The F-IRE Collective champions the notion of creative W A Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A, K581 expression and places education firmly at the heart of its Endymion core philosophy. It began in the mid-Nineties as a workshop where a group of young musicians met to train in West Philip Venables’s K is a tribute and prelude to Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet, which follows in this programme. It takes the first two bars of the Quintet African dance music, learning through this experience more and, in the composer’s words, ‘pulls them apart, exposing, reworking, communal ways of making music that they later applied in fragmenting, reflecting and elaborating their harmony and gesture’. The their own output. F-IRE rapidly developed into a community © Will Pascall fragment on which the piece is based is heard towards the end. of artists whose outlook stretched beyond music and into the 46 Mozart fell in love with the voice-like sound of the clarinet relatively late in life. Clarinet virtuoso Anton Stadler was the catalyst realms of dance, poetry, film and other modes of creative for this passion and inspired both the Clarinet Concerto and this expression. The world-class chamber ensemble Clarinet Quintet. The first of the Quintet’s four movements sets the mood with its charming, conversational exchange between the clarinet Clown Revisited Endymion always strives to bring the greatest and string quartet. The second movement is strikingly similar to the St Pancras Room 12.45pm chamber music past and present to a wide slow movement of the concerto, with the clarinet’s lyrical qualities to audience. Known for the vitality, virtuosity the fore. A delightful minuet with two trios follows before the theme Clown Revisited has already received rave and variations of the final movement in which Mozart experiments reviews with its inventive take on the music and innovation of its players, Endymion has further with all the possible combinations of instruments in a finale of that accompanies everyone’s favourite circus already made an impact at Kings Place by striking inventiveness. performer. This inspirational project from giving the first public performance in Hall 45 pianist and keyboardist Nick Ramm came © Martin Lee from an original idea inspired by circuses One at the opening Festival in 2008, with 44 in Denmark and Holland, where Nick a new piece by Simon Holt. Last summer played in the house band accompanying Endymion celebrated 30 years with a acrobats, magicians, trapeze artists, jugglers, For Richard Mühlfeld Wot is Jazz? contortionists and the clown performances. major new music project, Sound Census, Hall One 12.30pm St Pancras Room 11.30am When the time was right, he assembled a showcasing 27 premieres during a week group of musicians known for their playing of concerts here. This year their festival Brahms Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115 A fun introduction to jazz for six- to ten- skills and for their ability to read music. Nick has collaborated with many top UK programmes epitomise the character of year-olds (accompanying adults may learn Endymion something too) hosted by Jennymay Logan artists including Jim Mullen, The Cinematic Endymion’s music-making, contrasting two of Basquiat Strings/Elysian String Quartet Orchestra and Jack Bruce. This five-piece of the most emotional and engaging classics Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet has much in common with the Clarinet assisted by musicians of the collective. consists of tuba, piano, cello, flute and Quintet by Mozart (heard earlier this morning). Like Mozart, Brahms’s percussion and they perform with a strong of the repertoire by Mozart and Brahms with late conversion to the clarinet was inspired by a virtuoso, Richard visual element. The skilful players and an intriguing recent work by composer and Mühlfeld, for whom he also wrote his two masterful clarinet sonatas. arrangements offer a vibrant sound with a artistic director Philip Venables. Mühlfield premiered the work with a quartet led by violinist Joseph rich dynamic. Circus-inspired themes keep the Joachim, Brahms’s long-time friend and collaborator. players on their toes, balancing written notes ‘The brilliant Endymion’ The Sunday Times As a tribute to Mozart’s Quintet, Brahms’s follows a similar four- with improvised passages that frequently movement structure. The first movement, like many of Brahms’s late switch between styles and tempos. In this works, has a brooding, autumnal quality. The second movement shows show you will hear an Afro-Peruvian groove, Endymion Brahms at his most expansive and lyrical, with the strings subtly echoes of vaudeville, a cha-cha-cha, a dose Mark van de Wiel clarinet playing on the colours and harmonic flavour of the clarinet melody. of medieval hip-hop, a quick frenzied clown Krysia Osostowicz violin The short third movement, with its gently meandering melodies, is one dance and a slow piece with a never-ending Clara Biss violin of the few lighter moments in the work. Following Mozart’s example, melody. This session guarantees to reveal the Asdis Valdimarsdottir viola Brahms finishes with a theme and variations but where Mozart’s is mysteries of jazz in a fun and participatory Jane Salmon cello playful and charming, Brahms’s is searching and darkly romantic. top: Clown Revisited, centre: Jennymay Logan atmosphere for all to enjoy. 38 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 39
  • 22. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY Free Events! Free Events! A Cappella at Kings Place Junk Band 50 Curated by Philip Venables & Serge Vuille Following the overwhelming success of the In the Smoke Rubbish Music first-ever London A Cappella Festival held 47 Foyer 1pm Foyer 1.45pm at Kings Place in January 2010, this short Many of the members of London-based Steve Reich Clapping Music series of free performances continues to a cappella sensation In the Smoke sang in Peter Wiegold Brouhaha showcase more of the UK’s best a cappella Out of the Blue (who caused a stir at the Philip Venables New Piece (world premiere) London A Cappella Festival in January) and groups. The London A Cappella Festival, other award-winning collegiate groups. This Serge Vuille curated by the world-famous, five-time is an all-singing, all-dancing, all-enthralling Adam Clifford Grammy-winning vocal group the Swingle group performing the best of contemporary Scott Lumsdaine a cappella music! Sarah Cresswell Singers, brings together the UK’s diverse a cappella community, with music ranging This short concert features music performed by a ‘junk band’ with 48 from choral and jazz to contemporary and instruments made from diverse materials such as tin cans, oil drums, bits of wood and even a drum kit made from cardboard boxes! Together gospel ensembles. these unusual instruments are capable of creating a remarkable variety Diversity Choir of sonic colours. Foyer 2pm Steve Reich’s Clapping Music is one of his most famous works and a classic of early Minimalism. It is usually performed by a pair Diversity, London’s premier LGBT chamber of musicians clapping their hands: both play identical rhythms but choir, regularly performs some of the most the shifting of one of the performer’s rhythms against the other beautiful classical music written for choirs creates music of startling intricacy. Today’s performance will use junk along with the best of other musical genres. instruments to create the ‘clapping’ rhythms. This year, Diversity will compete in the BBC Like Clapping Music, Peter Wiegold’s work, Brouhaha, uses repeated Choir of the Year competition. rhythmic cells but these are employed for very different ends. Full of jazzy rhythms and nonsensical vocal noises, Brouhaha is a piece of unrestrained, raucous energy. Originally written for a single percussionist, here it is arranged for the eccentric sounds of the ‘junk band’. 49 Philip Venables, the curator of this event, completes the programme with a new commission. This piece for a quartet of junk players, explores the unique acoustic environment of Kings Place, creating echo and Evolution hocketting effects across this immense space. Foyer 3pm The instruments will be in situ in the Kings Place atrium throughout the festival for you to try out, play with, look at, and read about. Evolution are the 2009 BABS (British Association of Barbershop Singers) National Notes by Zubin Kanga Quartet Champions, so probably know a thing or two about a cappella! We are delighted to welcome them back to Kings Place for the first of two sets, following their triumphant performance at the London A Cappella © Amy K Walker Festival in January. This event is to be repeated on Sunday 12 September © David Knight left: In the Smoke above: Phil Venables 40 kings place festival’10 www.kingsplace.co.uk kings place festival’10 www.kingsplace.co.uk 41
  • 23. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Latin American Classics II © Graham Topping © Graham Topping Chilingirian Quartet / Millennium Quartet On the Chilingirian Quartet’s first visit to Latin America they met Villa-Lobos’s widow in Brazil, who gave them the music for his 16th Quartet. The distinguished British- based quartet have since made many visits to South America, where they have encountered its unique multiplicity of cultures and 51 52 53 enjoyed meeting a variety of composers and performers. In January 2010 they were charged with developing a Chamber Music David Carpio’s Octet Bachianas Brasileiras Last Round Academy in Venezuela, for the young players Hall One 2.30pm Hall One 3.45pm Hall One 5pm involved in El Sistema, the world-renowned Alberto Ginastera Quartet No. 1 Heitor Villa-Lobos Bachianas Brasileiras No. 1 Heitor Villa-Lobos Quartet No. 16 orchestral-training organisation. David Carpio Octet (world premiere) Inocente Carreño Quartet No. 2 Juan Bautista Plaza Fuga criolla y Fuga romántica Heitor Villa-Lobos Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 Osvaldo Golijov Last Round For Kings Place Festival they have Chilingirian String Quartet chosen to share the platform with one of Millennium Quartet Philip De Groote, Valmore Nieves, Melissa Phelps Chilingirian Quartet El Sistema’s most exciting ambassadors, Cellists of the Royal College of Music Millennium Quartet Born in Buenos Aires of a Catalan father and an Italian mother, Sonia Grani soprano Enno Senft double bass the Millennium Quartet, whose players Alberto Ginastera (1916-83) lived to become unquestionably the Chilingirian Quartet the Chilingirian have coached. Says Levon most significant figure in Argentinian classical music during the Villa-Lobos composed his Sixteenth Quartet in Paris in 1955; Chilingirian: ‘The Kings Place Festival 20th century. Though he eventually moved in a ‘neo-expressionist’ Starting in 1930 Villa-Lobos (1887-1959) composed what is probably unflagging in its invention, like many of his works it is infused with direction, Ginastera was much influenced by Bartók in music of his his most famous series of works, the nine Bachianas Brasileiras. A Brazilian song and dance character, but sublimated into a sophisticated, provides a long-awaited opportunity to early maturity. This is well illustrated by the passionate and virtuoso lifelong admirer of the music of J S Bach, by this title he meant to mature idiom. The slow movement, with its soulful cello melody, is introduce the music we have so enjoyed over First String Quartet (1948), which was his first significant venture into suggest a synthesis of Bach’s style – especially his endless melody reminiscent of the Bachianas Brasileiras; the sparkling scherzo is the years and the young musicians who have chamber music after he had made his early reputation with colourful and elaborate polyphony – with the spirit of Brazilian music in all its one of his best. Juan Bautista Plaza (1898-1965), noted for his sacred orchestral works. The highly dissonant first movement, the ghostly, melodic and rhythmic diversity, along with Villa-Lobos’s personal music, was Kapellmeister at Caracas Cathedral but also wrote notable been so exciting to work with.’ muted scherzo and the slow movement whose harmonies are derived blend of polytonality. Bachiana No. 1 was to be performed by a instrumental works. He was a pioneer in Venezuelan music education from the open strings of the guitar, and the finale’s vigorous play with ‘cello orchestra’ of at least eight players, with the central movement, and musicology who helped his compatriots establish a national 5/8 rhythms are all highly characteristic of his music at this period. Modinha, being a kind of sweetly melodious, sentimental song which style. He composed Fuga criolla for strings in 1931, adding the Fuga Chilingirian Quartet As we went to press few details were available about the new Villa-Lobos thought of as a counterpart to Bach’s arias. The well-loved romántica in 1950 to make a two-part work, though the two fugues are Levon Chilingirian violin Octet by David Carpio, who is principal double-bass of the renowned Bachiana No. 5 is for soprano and eight cellos. In the first movement often performed separately. In a sense they ‘Venezuelanise’ J S Bach Ronald Birks violin Simón Bolívar Orchestra, other than that the work is scored for 3 the soprano spins her soaring melody above pizzicato cellos, and just as Villa-Lobos sought to make him into a Brazilian. Susie Mészarós viola violins, 2 violas, 2 cellos and a quattro (a small Venezuelan guitar), in the passionate central section intones a nocturnal poem by Ruth Osvaldo Golijov is now the most celebrated contemporary Philip De Groote cello which should make for an unusual and lively sound-texture. Valadares Corrêa. The lively, humorous finale is a martelo, a dance- Argentine composer of classical music, though his roots are in song from Northern Brazil, to a poem invoking the birds of Brazil the Jewish communities of Romania and the Ukraine and he grew Millennium Quartet and their songs. The Venezuelan teacher, conductor and horn-player up speaking Yiddish. Last Round, originally commissioned by the Ollantay Velásquez violin Inocente Carreño (b. 1919) has written two string quartets displaying Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, is a sublimated tango Miguel Nieves violin a wide range of styles and a melodic gift, founded on Venezuelan folk fantasy in which two string quartets are scored for an idealised Jesús Pérez viola music, that has also brought him renown as a composer of songs. bandoneon (the small accordion-like instrument of which Astor Valmore Nieves cello Piazzolla was a virtuoso) and its two movements are a homage to Piazzolla’s fighting spirit and also to Carlos Gardel, whose song ‘My beloved Buenos Aires’ provides the basis of the last movement. left to right: Millennium Quartet, Chilingirian String Quartet Notes by Malcolm Macdonald 42 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 43
  • 24. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY Outer Circle: Bristol © Jim Barr 55 Arctic Circle is an extended family of Eyebrow extremely talented individuals from around Hall Two 4pm the world who all share the same musical Eyebrow is Paul Wiggens and Pete Judge. vision. Its aim is to put on the best events, When not in Eyebrow, Paul has played for the release the best music or just simply legendary punk-jazz band Blurt and Pete also plays for Get The Blessing (BBC Jazz Award entertain to the best of its ability. Previous winners 2008). Arctic Circle series at Kings Place have featured London-based artists, but now the ‘Their haunting sounds trickle down the spine like dripping stalactites. With just one circle is widening. This series of concerts drummer, one trumpet player and a host of showcases three of the finest new and expertly controlled effects boxes they create emerging talents from Bristol. a sound that is both gentle and unsettling’ Morning Star. Sunday 12 September sees the Arctic Circle ‘Since emerging last summer, this duo have concert series team up with Humble Soul to been spellbinding audiences wherever they play’ Venue, 2010. feature some of Manchester’s most exciting and genre defining contemporary musicians. © Jeremy Benassy © Adam Faraday Curated by Arctic Circle 54 56 Rozi Plain François & The Atlas Mountains Hall Two 2.45pm Hall Two 5.15pm Rosalind Leyden is the Bristol-based François arrived on the Bristol scene from singer-songwriter who records under the Bordeaux in autumn 2003. His music is name Rozi Plain. Her distinctive voice weaves marked by a mix of refreshingly playful beautiful, inventive melodies around the and experimental ideas coupled with a sounds of clarinets puffing like steamboats natural pop sensibility and gentle bilingual or banjos rippling like bubbling streams and vocals. François plays with band The Atlas her stage performance is warm and open. Mountains. Their most recent album, Plaine Rozi’s stunning 2008 debut album Inside Inondable (Fence) features Gallic chamber- Over Here was hailed by Plan B as ‘unhurried, pop, inspired by the Seventies African music understated, and ace’, and by The List as of Ethiopia and Mali: ‘Piano chords swell, ‘gorgeous, original and brimful of character’. electric guitars gently shimmer, and François’ soft croon floats throughout – his bilingual songs melding the bitter-sweet yearning of Leonard Cohen with the melodic playfulness of Serge Gainsbourg and Françoise Hardy.’ left to right: Rozi Plain, François, Eyebrow Folk Radio UK 44 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 45
  • 25. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER SPOKEN WORD Poet in the City: Contemporary Lines © Tom Bland Poet in the City is proud to present Contemporary Lines, a series of New Audiences events with the critically acclaimed Faber New Poets, showcasing the work of the seven new talents. Presented by the distinguished poets Jo Shapcott, David Harsent and Maurice Riordan, the Faber New Poets are Joe Dunthorne, Annie Katchinska, Sam Riviere, Fiona Benson, Toby Martinez de las Rivas, Heather Phillipson, and Jack Underwood. With a host of prizes between them, including several Eric Gregory Awards and the Michael Donaghy Poetry Prize, the Faber 7 are sure to deliver a stunning series of readings. Over three intriguing events, the poets will explore important contemporary subjects relating to the different ‘lines’ we use to navigate our lives: Maps, Bodies, and Communications. We use and create maps to understand the world, to locate important things and places, and to identify ourselves. With our bodies, we sense the world, creating pathways as we act and travel. Communications allow us to transmit ideas. We are living in an era where our communications are increasingly complex and our lines intersect to create vast networks, both on the web and in our cultural imagination, leading us to new and unexplored territory. 57 Maps St Pancras Room 3pm With Maurice Riordan, Annie Katchinska, and Sam Riviere 58 Bodies St Pancras Room 4.15pm With Jo Shapcott, Fiona Benson, Jack Underwood, and Joe Dunthorne 59 Communications St Pancras Room 5.30pm With David Harsent, Heather Phillipson, (photos in order of listing) Annie Katchinska © Oleg Katchinska and Toby Martinez de las Rivas Sam Riviere © Alice Lee Joe Dunthorne © Angus Muir 46 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 47
  • 26. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER FOLK Curated by Kathryn Tickell John Kirkpatrick 62 Folkworks – Tradition Hall One 7pm and Innovation John is one of the most prolific figures on the English folk scene with an enviable reputation as an instrumental virtuoso, as A series of three concerts celebrating the well as a leading interpreter of English folk folk and traditional music of our islands, music. His standing in English traditional music has been recognised with the award of with some of the country’s best-loved and Musician of the Year in the 2010 BBC Radio 2 well-established names, but also introducing Folk Awards. He is regarded as England’s newer artists who are making their own leading exponent of ‘squeezebox’ instruments. His remarkable skill with accordion, special impact and taking the tradition concertina and melodeon has taken him forwards. John Kirkpatrick (BBC Radio 2 Folk from folk dancing to experimental rock music Awards, Musician of the Year 2010) kicks off and a wide range of international recording collaborations. He is also a notable singer – the evening, followed by talented newcomers of traditional songs and of his own inimitable Jonny Kearney and Lucy Farrell, and The and often humorous compositions. Askew Sisters. Last to take the stage are the phenomenal duo Nancy Kerr and James Fagan, in their 15th year of performing together. What an evening! © James Pyne Book early… 63 64 © Amy Dyke Jonny Kearney and Lucy Farrell Nancy Kerr and James Fagan © Adrian McNally The Askew Sisters Hall One 9.30pm Hall One 8.15pm One of the most established and respected Two young acts making their own distinct duos on the folk scene, Nancy Kerr and James imprint. Fagan are winners of the BBC Radio 2 Folk Jonny and Lucy recently won many Award for Best Duo and the BBC Radio 2 friends across the country, supporting Horizon Award. Their musicianship and the Unthanks on their national tour. Their tingling, refreshing on-stage performance is a music is a mix of traditional and self- rare treat. Nancy, with her distinctive singing penned material, described by the Guardian and exquisite fiddle and viola style, and James, as ‘delicate, thoughtful and sad-edged…. with his powerful singing, dynamic and skilful effortless harmonies with their equally use of the flat-backed bouzouki and mandolin, delicate guitar, piano and violin work.’ enthral their audiences. Proud of their roots, The Askew Sisters’ brand of English folk this Northumbrian lass and the lad from Oz, music is an energetic blend of voice, fiddle with a twinkle in his eye, have such a finely- and melodeon. They play and sing with an honed act – they never fail to please. 2010 infectious enjoyment, winning them fans marks the 15th year of this electrifying duo. wherever they go. © Otis Luxton ‘Simply fantastic traditional music – look out, from top: Nancy Kerr and James Fagan, England – the sisters of stomp are heading Jonny Kearney and Lucy Farrell, The Askew Sisters your way!’ opposite: John Kirkpatrick 48 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 49
  • 27. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER JAZZ F-IRE presents … The F-IRE Collective has over the last ten years been known for its visionary bands and individuals – Seb Rochford and Polar Bear, Pete Wareham and Acoustic Ladyland, and David Okumu and the Invisible, Ingrid Laubrock, Robert Mitchell, the list goes on... a plethora of maturing stars have come from this fertile London community. F-IRE’s policies of promoting new talent, of sharing knowledge and opportunity, have sustained and grown their creative scene. They have been credited with revitalising UK jazz and inspiring other collectives to form with similar aims throughout the UK and Ireland. 65 Today, F-IRE’s output includes a busy record label, education projects, programming of festivals, even a kick-ass samba Tom Arthurs Trio Kit Downes Trio 66 Basquiat Strings 67 with the Elysian Quartet Hall Two 8.30pm Hall Two 9.45pm group. However this day provides a taster of the warmer and Hall Two 7.15pm more intimate sounds suited to the perfect acoustics of Hall Two. Kit Downes piano Ben Davis cello Tom Arthurs flügelhorn and trumpet Calum Gourlay bass Emma Smith violin Jasper Høiby double bass James Maddren drums Vicky Fifield violin Stuart Ritchie drums and percussion Jennymay Logan viola ‘World class’ Guardian Richard Pryce double-bass Emma Smith violin Seb Rochford drummer © Ben Speck Jennymay Logan violin Pianist and composer Kit Downes exploded Vincent Sipprell viola onto the British jazz scene playing with the Inspired by the raucous, rhythmically driving Laura Moody cello band Empirical, taking him through Europe traditional Hungarian string groups of and America (winning the EBU Jazz Award, Transylvania, the luxuriously rich Brahms The Tom Arthurs Trio features Danish bassist Jazzwise’s Album of the Year 2008 and the Sextets, and the arrangements of Charlie Jasper Høiby (Phronesis, Mark Lockheart) Peter Whittingham Award 2008). He then Mingus, cellist Ben Davis wanted to form a and Scots drummer and percussionist Stuart performed with Troyka, Stan Sulzmann’s group of players with fully developed classical Ritchie (Julian Arguelles, Colin Steele). They Neon, Clark Tracey and James Allsopp’s techniques while being still profoundly offer their own personal take on the jazz and Golden Age of Steam, going on to win the influenced by the whole jazz experience. improvised music worlds with performances BBC Jazz Award for Rising Star in 2008, a After BBC Jazz Award Winner and Mercury all over Europe. The Elysian Quartet (formed Yamaha Scholarship in 2009 and two British Prize nominee Seb Rochford had performed in 1999) focus on 20th-century experimental Jazz Award Nominations. The Trio has and recorded with the quintet, Davis invited and contemporary music. They are famed recorded live sessions for BBC Jazz on 3 as him to join the line-up. Rochford’s outstanding for their genre-busting collaborations with well as playing at the London Jazz Festival, improv drumming helped to cement the the likes of virtuoso beat-boxer Killa Kela, Cheltenham Jazz Festival and Glasgow Jazz compositions, and their debut album Basquiat jazz pianist Keith Tippett, and experimental Festival. Their debut album Golden was Strings (2007) has gained critical acclaim from electronic composer Simon Fisher-Turner. marked out in Jazzwise’s Album of the Year both the jazz and mainstream music press. Composed during Tom Arthurs’ stint as New 2009 list. Generation Artist for the BBC, and premiered in Manchester’s prestigious Bridgewater Hall in February 2010, this project marks the joining of two of the UK’s most forward- left to right: Tom Arthurs Trio, Kit Downes Trio, looking chamber music ensembles. Basquiat Strings 50 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 51
  • 28. SATURDAY 11 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY Twisted Lounge presents … 69 70 Born in 2006, Twisted Lounge promotes and supports live musical performances of different Breathe curated by John Butcher Physicality curated by genres with established and emerging artists. In 2008 Twisted Lounge became a moveable St Pancras Room 8.45pm David Toop, Jamie Bissmire feast, taking its unique and eclectic brand to venues such as Café OTO and Kings Place, and Leon Michener John Butcher saxophones St Pancras Room 10pm collaborating with a host of different curators and musicians. For the third year in a row Twisted John Edwards double bass Lounge returns to Kings Place Festival to present three unique and exciting performances. Eddie Prévost prepared barrel drum, This unique soundclash features four distinct bowed cymbals and chimes radical masters of their craft. Space DJz’s very own Jamie Bissmire works with legendary Spokes II John Butcher / John Edwards sound man David Toop, pianist Leon Michener On the Point of a Needle Eddie Prevost and the refined vocals of E.laine. Hailing from Tracking Force John Butcher / John Edwards / a myriad of different musical backgrounds, Eddie Prévost they appear at first to possess a juxtaposition of totally opposing styles. However this rare For tonight’s performance John Butcher teams collaboration promises to create a stunning up with Eddie Prévost and John Edwards. set of air vibrations, where modern classical They present a concert which focuses on piano improvisations and beautiful vocals the concept of ‘musical breathing’ and the meet hard-edged techno, and rich electronica physicality of their instruments. As part of in a harmonious display of sonic and the performance Prévost will play a solo on compositional dexterity. an enormous custom-made drum that he carefully constructed from a wine barrel. For the first time ever the Kings Place audience will hear these unique artists performing in a duo and then in a solo setting before discovering how they finally come together to breathe in unison. 68 Loré Lixenberg St Pancras Room 7.30pm Mezzo-soprano Loré Lixenberg is a performer of spectacular intensity and expressiveness. The warmth, range and agility of her voice impress her audiences, as does as her total absorption in any role. Tonight’s performance is the latest collaboration between Loré and New Music Projects NÖ (Musik Aktuell) directed by Robert Crow. Exploring the depth and breadth of what the human voice can © Bryony McIntyre achieve, the project is inspired by an epic tale that embraces music and film animation. from left to right: Loré Lixenberg, John Butcher, David Toop, Jamie Bissmire, Leon Michener 52 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 53
  • 29. Sunday highlights 11am Gould Piano Trio play Suk and Dvorák. A lavishly lyrical ˇ programme from Bohemia by the world-class Gould Piano Trio. 12.45pm How Liszt smashed up pianos. Pianist and lecturer Kenneth Hamilton reveals why pianos didn’t always withstand the onslaught of Liszt’s radical new techniques and performs his Fantasy on Bellini’s Norma to demonstrate how it was done! 1.45pm Junk Band play Steve Reich (FREE in the Foyer) 2pm A Cappella Chantage (FREE in the Foyer) 3.45pm Sacconi Quartet and Simon Crawford-Phillips play the Brahms F minor Piano Quintet. Don’t miss one of the great masterpieces of the Romantic repertoire performed by five extraordinary talents. 5.15pm The fabulous Nicolas Meier Trio are rising stars of the jazz scene. They’ll set Hall Two alight with their hypnotic, jazz- infused Turkish, flamenco and world music rhythms. Don’t miss it! 7pm, 8.15pm, 9.30pm Arctic Circle brings you hot new contemporary talent from Manchester in three exciting concerts. © Morley von Sternberg 54 55
  • 30. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL 71 72 Gould Piano Trio Bohemian Rhapsody Hall One 11am Variations in a major key Hall One 12.15pm Suk Elegie Op. 23 (‘Under the Impression of Zeyer’s Vysehrad’) Beethoven Variations in G on Dvorák Piano Trio No. 3 in F minor, Op. 65 ˇ ‘Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu’ Op. 121a Brahms Piano Trio No. 2 in C, Op. 87 The Gould Piano Trio is one of the UK’s finest chamber Gould Piano Trio ensembles, boasting an impressive discography, and festival Gould Piano Trio The composers in this concert are linked not only through a shared love appearances at Edinburgh, Cheltenham, City of London, Bath, of Czech folk music – Josef Suk was Dvorák’s pupil, and eventually his ˇ Beethovens ‘Kakadu’ Variations, based on a popular contemporary aria, Aldeburgh and the BBC Proms. son-in-law. Suk’s 1902 Elegie was inspired by a cycle of poems about were probably written around 1803. They were one of Beethoven’s few The group have a special affinity with the 19th-century a Czech legend. Although he originally scored for violin, cello, string British-published works, printed by Chappell in 1824. quartet, harmonium and harp, Suk quickly rearranged the work for the A slow G minor introduction gives way to the chirpy, major- Romantic repertoire, and last year released a set of Brahms’s more saleable combination of piano trio. A yearning, heart-on-sleeve keyed song theme. The piano alone plays Variation 1, and the three complete music for piano trio to great acclaim, but they have theme dominates, with contrast provided by a short but intense section instruments don’t come together again until Variation 4. Contrapuntal also been active in commissioning and promoting new music. that’s tempestuous in tone, and highly evocative of gypsy music. A imitation is the hallmark of the fifth, before the piano grabs the tune for snatch of this makes a surprise reappearance towards the end, before a the sixth, playfully punctuated by the strings. Variation 9 is a pathos- These two programmes go straight to the heart of the lull and a final reprisal of the main theme. ridden minor-keyed Adagio. A battle between major and minor ensues Central European chamber music tradition. The first features Dvorák’s 1883 piano trio echoes the style of his friend Brahms ˇ during the Presto Variation 10. After the major key conquers, the pace the music of two Czech composers, contrasting Josef Suk’s in its dramatic intensity and rhythmic interplay. However, its strong slows to a final Allegretto, also based on the theme. Czech flavour ensures it’s still unmistakably Dvorák. Dark in tone, it ˇ Brahms’s intense Piano Trio, completed in 1882, feels thoroughly lyrical Elegie with Dvorák’s profoundly heartfelt Trio in ˇ was composed soon after the death of his mother. The long, frequently symphonic in scale, its rich textures and soaring melodies frequently F minor, written in the wake of his mother’s death. In the tempestuous first movement is dominated by its brooding opening appearing to strive beyond the confines of their chamber walls. A second concert Beethoven’s delightful ‘Kakadu’ Variations theme, despite the cello offering a calmer second subject. A folky, polka- dramatic Allegro moderato, full of dynamic and rhythmic contrasts, is inflected Allegretto grazioso is followed by the most Brahmsian of the followed by a tragic, minor-keyed theme and variations. The mood preface Brahms’s turbulent Trio in C. movements, a lushly romantic Poco adagio that sets triple and duple remains dark, and the key minor, for the tensely hurried Scherzo, meters against each other. Dance-like motives return for the Finale, but although its C major trio provides a carefree respite. The exciting Finale, ‘Alice Neary and Benjamin Frith have developed a deep in a brooding, dramatic tone that recalls the opening Allegro. with its surprise modulations of key, and melodies unexpectedly changing tack, builds to a triumphant climactic flourish. musical understanding with Lucy Gould in this repertoire… combining a youthful freshness with virtuoso panache as Notes by Charlotte Gardner their talents merge into a richly cohesive whole.’ Observer Gould Piano Trio Lucy Gould violin Alice Neary cello Benjamin Frith piano © Chris Stock 56 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 57
  • 31. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER FAMILY SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Kenneth Hamilton © OAE Kids The World of the Romantic Pianist Scottish concert pianist and lecturer Kenneth Hamilton returns to Kings Place for two fascinating performing lectures on the Romantic piano. Author of the best-selling After the Golden Age: Romantic Pianism and Modern Performance, Hamilton has recently appeared as soloist in Philadelphia for the world premiere of his new edition of Liszt’s Hexameron for piano and orchestra, given a memorable re-creation of Liszt’s 1847 concerts in Constantinople for the Istanbul Festival, and participated in the successful Beethoven Unwrapped series at Kings Place. Expect a lively, informal insight into the Romantic piano world with expert demonstrations. 75 76 73 How Sigismond Thalberg invented cocktail music: How Liszt smashed up pianos: A Fantasy on Bellini’s Norma Family Events OAE KIDS A Fantasy on Rossini’s Moses St Pancras Room 12.45pm Workshop St Pancras Room 11.30am 74 Kenneth Hamilton pianist and lecturer Hall Two 11.15am Kenneth Hamilton pianist and lecturer Come and interact with some of the OAE Family Events Thalberg may have had three hands, but OAE KIDS The most popular concert piece in the mid- not to be outdone, Liszt reputedly had six players and their historic instruments. 19th century wasn’t anything by Chopin, but fingers on each of his. He borrowed quite Bang a drum, shake a maraca, ting a triangle Concert: Our favourite things a few of Thalberg’s piano techniques, and Sigismond Thalberg’s stunning Fantasy to Handel’s wonderful Water Music. See how Hall Two 12.30pm on Rossini’s Moses. When Thalberg first added several more of his own invention a double bass pretends to be a drum and help appeared on the scene, even professional to create Romantic keyboard effects that create a new accompaniment to composer Bring your favourite toy – see some of our musicians had no idea how he achieved can still astonish today. There was only one Heinrich Biber’s marching violin. favourite instruments – hear some of our his amazing effects; it seemed, they all said, problem – the early piano couldn’t cope. Share the fun with everyone at the favourite Baroque music, including pieces as if he had three hands! But later it was Broken instruments littered the stage of following OAE KIDS Concert at 12.30pm. by Henry Purcell, Heinrich Biber and George discovered that Thalberg hadn’t actually Liszt’s recitals. On one occasion he even Frideric Handel. carried on playing while the piano tuner was acquired an extra appendage, he had simply For ages 4-6 Listen out for swinging monkeys, invented what we now know as cocktail-bar simultaneously trying to repair the damage. fluttering birds, a marching violin and lots of Performing Liszt’s Fantasy on Bellini’s piano music. Kenneth Hamilton shows how dancing feet. Enjoy the fruits of the morning’s Norma as an illustration, Kenneth Hamilton he did it, and plays Thalberg’s famous Fantasy OAE KIDS workshop as our youngest ever demonstrates why the early piano suffered – disappointingly using only two hands. performers share the stage. under Liszt’s sometimes excessive, but always Get ready to join the fun and songs in our imaginative style of playing. very first concert for young children and their families. (Both events: Maximum of 20 children, with 1 or 2 accompanying adults each) For ages 6 and under 58 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 59
  • 32. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY Free Events! Free Events! A Cappella at Kings Place 77 80 Junk Band Following the overwhelming success of the Voice Rubbish Music first-ever London A Cappella Festival held Foyer 1pm Foyer 1.45pm at Kings Place in January 2010, this short Voice is a young, female a cappella trio Steve Reich Clapping Music series of free performances continues to performing repertoire spanning a range Peter Wiegold Brouhaha showcase more of the UK’s best a cappella of ages and continents, from the medieval Philip Venables New Piece (world premiere) chant of Hildegard of Bingen, to 20th-century groups. The London A Cappella Festival, European folk songs. Their distinctive sound Serge Vuille curated by the world-famous, five-time is driven by individual voices that blend to Adam Clifford Grammy-winning vocal group the Swingle create beautiful harmonies. Scott Lumsdaine Sarah Cresswell Singers, brings together the UK’s diverse a cappella community, with music ranging This short concert features music performed by a ‘junk band’ with from choral and jazz to contemporary and 78 instruments made from diverse materials such as tin cans, oil drums, bits of wood and even a drum kit made from cardboard boxes! Together gospel ensembles. these unusual instruments are capable of creating a remarkable variety of sonic colours. Chantage Steve Reich’s Clapping Music is one of his most famous works Foyer 2pm and a classic of early Minimalism. It is usually performed by a pair of musicians clapping their hands: both play identical rhythms but Winners of the BBC Radio 3 Choir of the Year the shifting of one of the performer’s rhythms against the other © Simon Hargrave 2006, Chantage is one of the capital’s finest creates music of startling intricacy. Today’s performance will use junk and most energetic young chamber choirs, instruments to create the ‘clapping’ rhythms. performing an astonishingly diverse array of Like Clapping Music, Peter Wiegold’s work, Brouhaha, uses repeated repertoire, and frequently appearing on TV rhythmic cells but these are employed for very different ends. Full of and radio. jazzy rhythms and nonsensical vocal noises, Brouhaha is a piece of unrestrained, raucous energy. Originally written for a single percussionist, here it is arranged for the eccentric sounds of the ‘junk band’. Philip Venables, the curator of this event, completes the programme 79 with a new commission. This piece for a quartet of junk players, explores the unique acoustic environment of Kings Place, creating echo and hocketting effects across this immense space. The instruments will be in situ in the Kings Place atrium throughout the festival for you to try out, play with, look at, and read about. Evolution Foyer 3pm Notes by Zubin Kanga A second set from Evolution, who were the 2009 BABS (British Association of Barbershop Singers) National Quartet © Taymour Soomro Champions. We are delighted to welcome them back to Kings Place, following their triumphant performance at the London A repeat of the Junk Band event A Cappella Festival in January. on Saturday 11 September above: Evolution above: Phil Venables 60 kings place festival’10 www.kingsplace.co.uk kings place festival’10 www.kingsplace.co.uk 61
  • 33. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Sacconi Quartet with Simon Crawford-Phillips Rarely is there an opportunity in London to hear three giants Sacconi Quartet Ben Hancox & Hannah Dawson violins of the piano quintet repertoire performed on one occasion. Robin Ashwell viola For these three concerts, pianist Simon Crawford-Phillips Cara Berridge cello joins the Sacconi Quartet to bring the great piano quintets of Simon Crawford-Phillips piano Brahms, Schumann and Dvorák to the Kings Place stage. ˇ This afternoon of concerts is the first of a planned series in which these musicians will collaborate to perform all of the © Susie Ahlburg masterpieces in this genre. a l ke m The Sacconi Quartet’s innovative programming and rn A Ho o exceptional playing mark them out in the British scene v an today. Their energy and creativity are bringing a new tia e ne audience to chamber music with their concerts, recordings ©V and outreach work. The Quartet makes a welcome return to Kings Place after their week of groundbreaking concerts, one of the highlights of the opening season. Simon Crawford-Phillips is renowned for his imaginative playing and dynamic musicianship. He is developing a 81 82 83 diverse career as soloist, song accompanist, conductor, and pianist in the Kungsbacka Trio. A Quintet for Clara Hard-won Masterpiece Dumka and Dancing Hall One 2.30pm Hall One 3.45pm Hall One 5pm ‘The festival sensation, the young Sacconi Quartet, completely bowled over a packed audience.The chemistry Schumann Piano Quintet in E flat, Op. 44 Brahms Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34 Dvorák Piano Quintet in A, Op. 81 ˇ between these four young players is tangible and magical.’ Sacconi Quartet Sacconi Quartet Sacconi Quartet The Scotsman with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano Schumann wrote his Piano Quintet for his This quintet beautifully illustrates Brahms’s Dvorák’s 1887 quintet is a masterpiece of ˇ wife, Clara, during his ‘Chamber Music Year’ lifelong perfectionist streak. Its first lyrical Bohemian spirit, its palette of moods of 1842 and it was an immediate success incarnation was in 1862, as a string quintet ranging from unbounded joy to introspective with musicians and audiences. The first with two cellos. Unsatisfied, Brahms melancholy. movement’s sparkling theme is followed by a rearranged it as a two-piano duet. Still After the dramatic Allegro has whirled to gentler, more romantic second subject. After unsatisfied, in 1864 he re-scored it as a piano a close, pathos enters with the Dumka, a type a funeral march, the cheerful Scherzo, based quintet. Two tumultuous, passionate outer of melancholic Ukranian ballad. Well-oiled around ascending and descending scales, movements, replete with interwoven melodic fingers are required for the merry Scherzo is unusual for having two contrasting trio lines, are the bookends for a tender, major- based on a Bohemian dance this time, the sections. Schumann neatly concludes the final keyed Andante, and an emotionally highly furiant. The triumphant rush to the equally movement by combining its main theme with wrought Scherzo. light-hearted Finale’s finish is heralded by an the opening one of the entire work. augmented pianissimo version of its theme. Notes by Charlotte Gardner left: Simon Crawford-Phillips right: Sacconi Quartet 62 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 63
  • 34. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY / CLASSICAL / JAZZ International Guitar Foundation (IGF) Yet again the International Guitar Foundation brings thrilling music to Kings Place Festival, showcasing the unique versatility of the world’s most popular instrument. The guitar is one of the world’s oldest solo instruments, and it is found in every musical culture. It excels in all musical styles, from heavy metal and rock to jazz, bluegrass, flamenco and classical – and it transcends barriers of age and culture. Celebrating the guitar’s rich heritage, multicultural origins and exciting future, the IGF presents an eclectic preview of its 86 forthcoming London Guitar Festival 2010 (at Kings Place, 27 – 31 October 2010). This concert series features Ireland’s award-winning Stefan Galt, leading young classical guitarist Amanda Cook and rising Nicolas Meier Trio stars of the vibrant British jazz scene, the Hall Two 5.15pm Nicolas Meier Trio. Demi Garcia percussion Paolo Minervini bass Nicolas Meier acoustic guitars 84 85 Swiss guitarist Nicolas Meier is one of the rising stars of a vibrant British jazz scene with his trademark sound of hypnotic, jazz- infused Turkish and world music rhythms. He Stefan Galt Amanda Cook presents his new trio album Breeze, featuring Hall Two 2.45pm Hall Two 4pm standards alongside new pieces with flamenco and oriental influences. Award-winning Stefan Galt is one of Ireland’s One of the leading young classical guitarists finest young guitarists. His debut solo album of her generation, Amanda has performed and ‘A seductive balance of strong themes, Before that I did this is a journey through the recorded internationally to universal acclaim. inventive improvising and dynamic variety’ heartland of traditional American roots music. Her three solo albums have cemented her John Fordham, Guardian. With influences from blues, jazz, country reputation as one of the finest players in and bluegrass, Stefan is following the route the UK. She also plays chamber music as of pioneering musicians such as Chet Atkins, a member of the ‘Appassionata’ guitar trio Tommy Emmanuel, Bela Fleck and Jerry Reed. and Tom Kerstens’ G Plus Ensemble. Her His outstanding musicality and jaw-dropping programme includes music by John Dowland, technique never fail to enthral his audience. Federico Moreno Torroba and William Lovelady. left to right: Stefan Galt, Amanda Cook, Nicolas Meier 64 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 65
  • 35. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Royal Academy of Music © RAM 87 89 Britain’s rich musical life is permeated A Sea of Tonality: Debussy, Satie and Takemitsu Elegiac Harp with Royal Academy of Music graduates, St Pancras Room 3pm St Pancras Room 5.30pm from Sir Henry Wood to Sir Simon Rattle, Joanna MacGregor to Elton John. Every Performers from the Royal Academy of Music 88 Performers from the Royal Academy of Music year, talented young musicians from over Debussy Préludes, Book I: No. 10, La cathédrale engloutie Ravel (arr. Kanga) Sonatine Satie Trois Descriptions automatiques: Sur un vaisseau Bax Elegiac Trio 50 countries come to study at the Academy, Pastiche, politics and all that jazz: Debussy Sonata for flute, viola and harp Takemitsu Equinox attracted by renowned teachers, and a Satie Trois Descriptions automatiques: Sur une lanterne Stravinsky, Weill and Eisler rich artistic culture that broadens musical Takemitsu Toward the Sea St Pancras Room 4.15pm ‘I feel my creative power moving headlong. May it endure, Lord!’ Satie Trois Descriptions automatiques: Sur un casque Debussy wrote in August 1915. He was staying near Dieppe in a horizons and develops professional creativity. Performers from the Royal Academy of Music villa from which he could gaze at ‘the expanse of the sea’, and had Debussy Préludes, Book II: No. 12, Feux d’artifice Join us for three concerts showcasing the recently finished his Sonata for cello and piano and was immersed Hanns Eisler ‘Über den Selbstmord’ next generation of musical stars. Satie was one of the most original characters in musical history, in the composition of his piano Études and the Sonata for flute, his music like the voice of a child, saying outrageous things with Hanns Eisler ‘Lied einer deutschen Mutter’ viola and harp. This work, he said, reminded him ‘of a very antique We open with the exquisite sound Stravinsky Piano-Rag-Music Claude Debussy, he of the Nocturnes, or so it seems to me’. His complete, honest calm. The core of an astonishing number of future worlds of Debussy, Satie and Takemitsu. developments in French music can be found in Satie’s seemingly naïve Stravinsky Three Easy Pieces choice of instruments gives the work a veil of melancholy, despite its Kurt Weill ‘Je ne t’aime pas’ Debussy’s impressionistic Préludes are miniatures with their often ludicrous, even nonsensical titles. Satie’s incomparable charm and moments of restrained joy. cool detachment however, has an elegant beauty of its own, entirely Hanns Eisler ‘Lied des Händlers’ Bax wrote his Elegiac Trio in 1916, the year after Debussy’s Sonata paired with Satie’s rhythmic miniatures, Stravinsky Ragtime for the same instrumental combination but composed in quite different lacking in nostalgia. Descriptions Automatiques, and two of the Despite its severely restricted scope Satie’s music was an important Stravinsky Tango circumstances. Bax was an Irishman at heart and wrote this Trio in one Hanns Eisler ‘Mutter Beimlen’ Japanese Takemitsu’s most accessible influence on Debussy – they became friends when they both played movement after the Easter Rising and the execution of one of the Irish the piano for cabaret at Le Chat Noir in Montmartre, Debussy admired Kurt Weill ‘Die Moritat von Mackie Messer’ nationalist leaders, Pádraig Pearse. However, this poignant music is not works. Next comes a vibrant set from the so much in memory of individuals as an elegy for Romantic Ireland, the Satie’s ‘refined sensibility interpreted by such simple means’, which inter-war period, mixing the comic and might well describe the achievements of Debussy’s own maturity, The impact of jazz on European music in the turbulent 1920s and 30s evocation of a distant past. is difficult to overestimate, sharpening as it did the split between bizarre with political insight, interspersed including his piano Préludes. The most original explorations that Skaila Kanga’s ingenious and sympathetic arrangement of Ravel’s Debussy made in writing for the piano were in the hushed resonances traditional and new values as composers embraced contemporary Sonatine for the same combination of instruments as Debussy’s Sonata with Stravinsky’s jazz-inspired piano works. elements such as jazz and cabaret music for inspiration. Both Eisler for flute, viola and harp was first performed in 1994. of pianissimo textures – take the opening of La cathédrale engloutie Finally, we contrast the fantastical, dream- and indeed, the final page of Feux d’artifice, a piece which, for all its and Weill turned away from the influences of their respective teachers Schoenberg and Busoni to write in styles combining elements of jazz, like music of Ravel, Bax and Debussy with virtuosity and fierce gymnastics, has the detached effect of a vivid dream. Notes by Jeremy Hayes 2010 Debussy was the 20th-century composer who made the most cabaret and popular music with astringent instrumentation and an acid three richly coloured chamber works for the tonality. The leftwing stance of both composers led them to work with radical break with the Western tradition and his ‘feel’ for the East found flute, viola and harp. © RAM an echo in Takemitsu’s feel for the West. Takemitsu considered Debussy the German poet, playwright and theatre director Bertold Brecht and his teacher and the worlds of dream, water, sea, garden, rain and wind Weill’s first major collaboration with Brecht, on Die Dreigroschenoper which often feature in Takemitsu’s music were prominent in Debussy (‘The Threepenny Opera’) in 1928 was a colossal success, a fusion of ‘The Academy exudes a cosmopolitan popular music with a classical structure which is regarded by many as too, unpredictable, fluctuating forms of nature. ‘My music is bottomless,’ confidence in tune with the global classical Takemitsu declared, ‘I only have the top – that’s because I’m Japanese.’ the embodiment of Weimar Republic satire at its finest. Eisler was even more politically engaged as a composer and his music business’ Guardian, 2009 commitment to socialism and his belief that music should be accessible to the proletariat led him to compose political choruses, protest songs, theatre music and film scores, often in a pungent, combative style. That supreme and all-embracing cosmopolitan Igor Stravinsky’s magpie tendencies drew him to take an ironic look at different musical conventions, including jazz. Tango may be a musical joke but the Piano-Rag-Music is a more serious attempt to extend the horizons of the ragtime formula by means of more sophisticated techniques; the cadenza-like interludes – without bar lines – are composed in the improvisatory style of jazz ‘breaks’. 66 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 67
  • 36. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CONTEMPORARY Outer Circle: Manchester © Joel Chester-Fildes Curated by Arctic Circle Arctic Circle is an extended family of extremely talented © Emily Dennison individuals from around the world who all share the same musical vision. Its aim is to put on the best events, release the best music or just simply entertain to the best of its ability. Previous Arctic Circle series at Kings Place have featured London-based artists, but now the circle is widening. Sunday sees Arctic Circle team up with Manchester’s Humble Soul to take us on a journey from the homespun, delicate, melodic folk of Nancy Elizabeth through the percussion-driven space pop of Homelife to the otherworldly electronic songwriting of Denis Jones.This series of concerts showcases some of Manchester’s most exciting and genre defining contemporary musicians. There is another Arctic Circle concert series on Saturday 11 September, featuring artists from Bristol. Nancy Elizabeth 92 Homelife 93 Denis Jones 94 Hall One 7pm Hall One 8.15pm Hall One 9.30pm Nancy Elizabeth mixes folk and post-rock Manchester legend Paddy Steer and long- Denis Jones is a self-taught guitarist and influences in her enchanting and dynamic term collaborator Tony Burnside are Homelife, songwriter based in Manchester. He began music, featuring piano, guitars, dulcimers, creating music that is both ethereal yet earthy, his musical life as a singer songwriter in harmonium and other instruments alongside with heavy use of acoustic timbres, swarms the classic UK mould of the likes of John her unique voice. This concert will feature of coloured percussion, bulbous synths and Martyn, and in recent years has developed songs from Nancy’s latest album Wrought Iron fresh use of languid Hawaiian guitar. Paddy’s a show-stopping live performance based which has received rave reviews: first love was punk, and Tony cites Hendrix around the core of his exceptional and ‘Brilliant, brilliant record’ The Word as his introduction to the power of music, unique guitar-playing style and rich, soulful ‘This is a sincere and genuine album of songs but Johnny Cash and Gillian Welch’s names voice. Using a loop station and all manner devoid of contrivance. An artist who should be come up first when the band discuss current of samplers and effects, Denis creates vast, seen as a beacon for future folkies’ BBC Music influences, signalling a more mellow acoustic complex orchestrations of beat-box rhythms, ‘A record of subtle beauty… Haunting, ethereal and an emphasis on song writing. multi-layered vocals and other-wordly sounds and totally compelling, everything a singer- which veer from subtle heart-wrenching folk and blues to heavy bass-driven electronica. © John Corrin songwriter should be’ Bearded This concert will be a special full-band performance with a choir and brass section. left to right: Nancy Elizabeth, Homelife, Denis Jones 68 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 69
  • 37. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER CLASSICAL Dante Quartet © Bernard O´Reilly The Dante Quartet is now familiar to Kings Place audiences Dante Quartet 97 Krysia Osostowicz violin after its stunning Czech Mates week this spring and Giles Francis violin performance of Ravel’s quartet earlier this year. The Quartet Judith Busbridge viola (whose name was chosen to reflect the idea of a great and Bernard Gregor-Smith cello Late Fauré Hall Two 9.45pm challenging journey) return to complete a Franco-Belgian Simon Crawford-Phillips piano cycle with the string quartets of Debussy, Fauré and Franck. Gabriel Fauré Winners of BBC Music Magazine Chamber Award 2009 Sonata No. 2 for violin and piano in E minor, for their Fauré/Franck recording on Hyperion, the Dantes Fiery Franck 95 Op. 108 String Quartet in E minor, Op. 121 have gained equally enthusiastic reviews for their ‘powerful, Hall Two 7.15pm passionate yet completely controlled performance’ of the Dante Quartet César Franck with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano Debussy. Each of these three composers wrote only one String Quartet in D string quartet. Opening with Franck’s radiant D major Quartet, The second of Fauré’s two violin Sonatas, written in the late flowering of age, the evening continues with Dante Quartet written in 1916/17, exemplifies the continuous melodic flow of his later music, with Debussy’s youthful Quartet and goes into the night with two Beethovenian dramatic gestures replaced The extraordinary blossoming of César masterpieces of Fauré’s elusive late style: the second Violin Franck’s music in his later years culminated in by a subtle play of light and shade, but Sonata and the marvellous String Quartet, his swan song. his last chamber work, the String Quartet of with climaxes of great intensity. The first 1889. It is constructed on an ambitious scale, The harlequin colours of Debussy movement, in a 9/8 metre disrupted by Hall Two 8.30pm 96 with many of Franck’s trademark ‘cyclic’ links syncopations, ends in the major key on a ‘One of the UK’s finest quartets… for sheer refinement, between movements. The first movement is flood-tide of piano arpeggios. The Andante sweetness and unanimity of purpose, these performances in five sections: a slow introduction based on Claude Debussy has a Bach-like ornamented melody (taken the strong initial melody, which is to be the Sonata for cello and piano from an abandoned symphony of more than strike me as exceptional.’ Financial Times String Quartet in G minor 30 years earlier) over an initially simple main cyclic theme of the work; a minor-key Allegro setting out two contrasting themes; chordal accompaniment. The major-key finale a slow interlude in the form of a fugue on Dante Quartet becomes in its later stages both more active the initial melody; a resumption of the with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano in its piano textures and more expansive in its © Bernard O´Reilly Allegro, completing a sonata scheme with a Such ‘cyclic’ cross-references are much melodic line. development and recapitulation; and a slow, Debussy’s Cello Sonata was composed in 1915, more overt in Debussy’s only String Quartet, The String Quartet was Fauré’s last subdued coda returning once more to the as the first of a projected set of Six Sonatas a glorious early work from 1893 (by which composition, written in 1923/24 in the face initial melody. The two central movements for various instruments – though he was to time he was already at work on the opera of declining health and deafness. His only are a muted Scherzo of Mendelssohnian write only two more before his death. The Pelléas et Mélisande). The opening phrase, chamber work without piano, it channels his lightness, with a central trio in which the Prologue has opening and closing sections with its strong rhythmic profile and distinctive habitual flowing lines into predominantly cello briefly recalls the cyclic theme, and a balancing declamation and lyricism, around melodic contour, constitutes a motto theme contrapuntal textures, in three movements rondo-form slow movement of Beethovenian an accelerating central episode. The Serenade which in various guises crops up throughout which all begin in minor keys and end in intensity. The finale begins by alternating evokes the guitar-playing Pierrots and the fluent first movement, dominates the the major. They are a sonata-form Allegro between a stormy octave figure and echoes Harlequins in the paintings of Watteau, with a scherzo, with its exotic pizzicato colouring, moderato (based on themes from an of the previous movements, before adopting middle section of flickering pizzicato half-light forms the increasingly impassioned melody unfinished violin concerto of the late 1870s), the cyclic theme as its main subject, and a and a subdued reprise. This leads into the which rises up in the centre of the slow a meditative Andante, and a scherzo-like motif from the first-movement Allegro as a urgent Finale, in which slow interludes refer movement between serene, muted outer finale, which unfolds with great spontaneity contrasting theme; the principal melody of the back to the previous movements – though in sections, and permeates the finale, from its to make, as Fauré’s biographer Robert slow movement is prominent among the earlier an understated, elusive fashion characteristic gradually accelerating introduction to its Orledge says, an ‘exhilarating finish to a ideas brought back in the passionate coda. of this subtle piece. exultant major-key coda. lifetime’s work’. Notes by Anthony Burton 70 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 71
  • 38. SUNDAY 12 SEPTEMBER BLUES Spitz Blues 99 100 After selling out Spitz Blues John Crampton Parkbench at the Kings Place Festival St Pancras Room 8.45pm St Pancras Room 10pm 2009, the Spitz is back with a ‘ …raucous but technically skilled blues ‘There is jazz here, and blues, and country, and line-up that brings together mainly based around his flair on national roots, and nothing that you can pin down to a the best of last year and what steel (with and without bottleneck) or, on genre or a style! But it’s all good! Takes you in two track banjo and harmonica.’ direction after direction.’ will undoubtedly be the best Blues in London on Kings Place Festival, Blues Matters (2008) of this year. 2009 We introduce you to J D After a year and a half in San Francisco, Having wowed the Kings Place Festival Parkbench are back in town with more ‘darkly Smith’s Rockabilly slide- audience last year, one-man blues explosion sophisticated slabs of lonesomeness’ (Time playing – and if that doesn’t John Crampton is back. Self-taught on Out). Be ready for brutal blues incantations wake you up, John Crampton guitar and harmonica, John creates a big with sudden musical u-turns and plenty of and powerful sound of hard-hitting and wall-of-sound Pink-Floydian improvisations. returns with his stomping danceable uptempo blues and bluegrass. Frontman Martin Wissenberg is joined by Blues. After missing last John plays slide and bottleneck on a friends – David Villanueva (guitars, bass, year’s Festival, we are 1930s National Steel Guitar with fantastic Starman); Franck Alba (guitars, Piano Magic) harmonica and thumping stomp box to and Jim Kimberly (drums, Bruise). delighted that Parkbench provide a driving rhythm. will wind up the evening with their psych-ridden, multi- © Lea Despeyesses purpose blues. 98 J D Smith St Pancras Room 7.30pm ‘Sounds like an Elvis for the modern era’ The Music Magazine J D Smith is a London-based solo blues punk © Chris Tribble rockabilly slide player. Smith has rescued rockabilly from the brink and brought this amazing music to a larger audience. With an idea, a guitar and a heap of blues thrown in, J D is hoping to wake people up to the idea that a solo act can be dangerous again. left to right: John Crampton, J D Smith, Parkbench 72 kings place festival’10 all tickets £4.50 online www.kingsplace.co.uk 73
  • 39. EXHIBITIONS KINGS PLACE GALLERY 20 August – 2 October 2010 20 August – 8 October 2010 POST FESTIVAL LECTURE Art from Cape Farewell UNFOLD Anthony Whishaw RA Winter Landscapes Guest Lecturer: Dr Gail-Nina Anderson Images on the Edge of Perception – Large Paintings Monday 13 September, 6.30pm UNFOLD presents work in a variety of media by leading international artists and other creative individuals who have produced Anthony Whishaw’s tree paintings lie somewhere between From the allegorical imagery of the four seasons groundbreaking new works and responses that address climate abstraction and empathy. They are neither country nor climate- to the impeccable snowy landscapes that look so KINGS PLACE GALLERY change, primarily through their involvement with two Cape Farewell specific but are, as he put it, more “a Platonic idea of tree-ness.” inviting on our Christmas cards, representations expeditions to the High Arctic and one to the Peruvian Amazon Some paintings are abstracted to the point of becoming diagrammatic, of winter can chill and delight, surprise and T: 020 7520 1485 between 2007 and 2009. reassure us. This talk brings together winter though painterly, marks: others are more sculpturally descriptive. imagery from medieval calendars, Dutch F: 020 7520 1487 Participating artists include Chris Wainwright, David Buckland, Always, however, an elastically shifting space, deep, shallow and what landscapes, sentimental Victorian art and E: kpg@kingsplace.co.uk Ackroyd & Harvey, Amy Balkin, Claire Twomey, Francesca Galeazzi, he terms “microspace with little sense of scale” plays its part. His startlingly fresh Impressionist works to show Ian McEwan, Michele Noach, Sam Collins, Shiro Takatani, Sunand complex meditations upon and representation of Nature culminates in how the coldest season finds pictorial form. Opening hours Prasad and Tracey Rowledge. “an image in the process of making itself visible.” Kings Place Gallery and Bookshop: Organised in collaboration with the University of the Arts, the St Pancras Room, Concert Level, Kings Place above: above: TICKETS: £6.50 online Monday – Friday, 10am – 6pm exhibition tours to the University Gallery, Northumbria University Closed Bank Holiday 30 August Chris Wainwright Anthony Whishaw www.kingsplace.co.uk Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 5pm Red Ice from 8 October – 12 November 2010. Lyminge Forest 1991–2 Box Office: 020 7520 1490 Closed Bank Holidays Aluminium print Acrylic on canvas Admission Free 119.3 x 170cm Closed Bank Holiday 30 August 242 x 301cm 74 75
  • 40. EXHIBITIONS PANGOLIN LONDON PANGOLIN LONDON KINGS PLACE Sculpture, Prints & Drawings T: 020 7520 1480 E: gallery@pangolinlondon.com www.pangolinlondon.com Opening hours Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm Mondays by appointment only. Closed Bank Holidays and between exhibitions. Admission Free All works are available for purchase. The gallery is available for corporate hire and private parties, please contact us for further information. 9 September – 24 December William Pye – Sculpture William Pye is a master of manipulating water. His well known water sculptures can be found around the globe and will be exhibited at Kings Place for the first time during Autumn 2010. The natural world is a source of inspiration for many artists, and William Pye’s observations of natural forms, combined with his creative use of geometry, lie at the heart of his sculpture. above: William Pye Swishdish 8 September – 16 October left: David Bailey – Sculpture & Photographs William Pye Scylla As one of the world’s most notorious photographers recognized for Pangolin London his iconic images of 60s and 70s legends and his love of women, few Free Daily Sculpture Tours 12pm and 6pm Festival Opening Hours know of David Bailey’s passion for Picasso, Pliny The Elder, and his Meet in Pangolin London 10am – 10pm above: dedication to making his own sculpture. This show is the first ever Guided tour of the exhibition on display at Thursday, Friday, David Bailey public exhibition of Bailey’s sculpture and challenges the traditional Pangolin London and the works located Saturday & Sunday Shoe Tongue boundaries between art forms. around Kings Place. Maximum number: 30 76 77
  • 41. FESTIVAL FOOD & DRINK FESTIVAL FOOD & DRINK Treat yourself to a delicious meal at Kings Place Al fresco eating... Or drink and dine inside – we offer three options for the Festival A table out on Rotunda’s terrace is a relaxing Green & Fortune Café Rotunda Bar & Restaurant Festival Café spot to enjoy our hearty British cuisine while – for light bites – for quality British food – a hearty buffet on the waterside The 2010 Festival brings a huge range of watching the canal boats glide by. eating options which are fun, family friendly We pride ourselves on always sourcing Explore our generous selection of wholesome A fantastic waterside restaurant and bar in Serving hot food and drinks only during and will not break your bank! the freshest seasonal British ingredients. Our soups, fresh sandwiches and salads, and which to treat your family and friends. the Kings Place Festival period, our café farm in Northumberland produces the best succulent, hot carvery meats. We offer a great selection of British in Battlebridge Room is a relaxed place to lamb and beef, which we passionately cook in Succumb to an enticing display of cakes dishes, all very reasonably priced. With enjoy a meal while taking in the view over The highlight of this year’s festival is our first Rotunda’s kitchen. and desserts as an afternoon treat – no need special emphasis on British produce, we Battlebridge canal basin. A hot buffet is Farmer’s Market by the canal. The Market The Hog Roast on the terrace is a delicious to feel guilty, it’s a special weekend after all! proudly cook lamb and beef reared on our available here each day. addition to our al fresco dining. The succulent, will have exciting products available for you carved hog roast served in a fresh, wholemeal own farm in Northumberland. Green & Fortune Café will be open every Rotunda’s Private Dining Room, also Festival Café opening hours: to choose from. Open on Friday, Saturday bap will whet your appetite to return for more. day during the Festival until 10pm. with a canalside view, is ideal for a group of Thursday & Friday 5pm – 9pm and Sunday from 11am to 7pm. Walk around Evenings by the water are just magical. friends or a family gathering, with space for Saturday & Sunday 12 noon – 9pm Cocktails and cold drinks are the highlight – our canalside stalls and enjoy the last of the Rotunda Bar’s expert mixologists create fruity up to 24 guests for lunch or dinner. summer sunshine. concoctions to satiate body and soul. Rotunda Bar & Restaurant Festival opening hours: 11am to midnight To reserve a table in Rotunda Restaurant: enquiries@rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk T: 020 7014 2840 78 79
  • 42. TICKETS AND TRAVEL Booking Tickets for all performances £4.50 online Online www.kingsplace.co.uk Secure online booking 24 hours a day. Hall One Allocated Seating Hall Two All seating is unreserved St Pancras Room Your Journey All seating is unreserved We are located 300 metres from King’s Cross & St Pancras Stations Phone & in Person 020 7520 1490 Public Transport Monday – Saturday: 12 – 8pm; Sunday: 12 – 7pm Visit www.tfl.gov to help plan your Journey, (Closed Bank Holidays) alternatively call London Travel Information 020 7222 1234. Post Parking Kings Place Box Office NCP Car Park – Pancras Road 90, York Way, London N1 9AG Visit www.ncp.co.uk or call 0845 050 7080 for further details. Multi buy Offers Book tickets and save money: 3+ events save 10% 6+ events save 15% Access 10+ events save 20% Kings Place is fully accessible to those with disabilities and all The same number of tickets must be booked for auditoria offer suitable seating. Please inform us of any access each event to qualify for the discount. requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is Opening hours will vary during the Festival available in both Hall One and Hall Two. Two types of hearing enhancement are available, headsets for Kings Place: Outstanding Events Venue audience members who do not use a hearing aid or neck loops for use with hearing aids switched to the ‘T’ position. Guide Dogs and We have a passion for art, music & food. Kings Place combines outstanding meeting & Want to stay informed about what’s on at Kings Place? Hearing Dogs for the deaf can be taken into all areas of Kings Place. events spaces with concert halls, art galleries, Rotunda Bar & Restaurant, Green & Fortune Visit www.kingsplace.co.uk and sign up for e-updates. Café all in an inspiring & versatile setting just a short stroll from Kings Cross Station. A range of flexible spaces to accommodate up to 420 people • Waterside restaurant & event facilities • Dedicated Event Management Team • High-specification conference room • Innovative food with a key emphasis on quality, taste and presentation 90 York Way London N1 9AG event bookings: 020 7014 2838 events@kingsplaceevents.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk 80 www.kingsplace.co.uk box office 020 7520 1490 all tickets £4.50 online
  • 43. E & S F S O M F O F NT D & D EDY USICOOD COMED MUART COM MU RT FK COM USICRT F O L K C RL D ART L K CRL D M RT CO M M L D M O O A K K O F OOK CO RL D RT FF OL K WOR ORD F OL WORL RD A F OL RL D RD A Z Z FAL W ORD Z Z F L WO ORD F OL W Design / production: Spring House | Print: St Ives F OLL WO RD A Z Z IC AL EN W JA Z Z C AL N WO JA Z Z L WO WORY JA SSIC EN W Y JA SIC A EN W JA Z Z SIC ALOK E A N IC A N WO RY J L A SS SP OK ARY L A SSI P OK E ARY SSIC AP OK EP OR AK CL ASP OK OR ARCL A SSP OK ARY CL A S S SPEMP A R R R E OK E P OR INK C UE S MP O NK C E S S MP O CL A E S SNT EM DRIN UE S T EMPRINKLUE S MP O RINK BLU CONTDRIN L T EM& DR DY B ONT E DRIY BLUONT E RINK BLU CO OD & Y BL COND & DDY B ONT ED & D EDYUSIC OD & EDY & Y C ODCOME SIC COOD MED SIC C D & DMED MUSI T F O OMED USIC F OO OME SIC C F OO K COMD M T F O COM M M T L D U F O U O O R C C T K L K L D M ART L K CL D M T F O L K C ORL D D A OL K RL D AR OL K L D MU AR F OL WOR D AR F OLWORL D A OR RD Z F O OR AR Z F O L W WORZ Z F L WO ORDZ Z F OR ORD JA Z ZIC AL WOR JA Z Z AL WOR WO J A Z A L W O R D J A Z S I C A K EN J A I C A EN W J A A L W N W A R Y A S S K EN R Y S S I C K EN RY IC W Y A S P O RY S S OK RY IC OK E R CL P O R A L A P O R A L A SSOK ENOR ARK CL E S S P OR A CL AS SP P OR A L A SSS SP EMP O INK E S S MP O NK CE S S K CS SPT EMP DRIN BLUNT EMDRINK LUENT EMINK C LUE CONT & DR BLU ONT E DRI BLU B B & C LUE CON OD & MEDYC COOD & EDY C CO & DR EDY USIC F OOD EDY SIC OOD MEDY M S I C T F O CO U S I F O CO M U S I O O D CO M D M A R T CO D M U R T F CO AR F OL KRL D M ARTF OL K RL D M T FF OL K WORLORD F OL K ORL RD A F OL K D O AR W A Z ZL WOWOR JA Z Z L W ORD JA Z Z IC AL EN W JA Z Z C AL N WO JA Z Z I A A S K E Y SIC OK EN ARYA SSIC EN W ARY CL A S SP O R ARY L A SSSP OK R AR C P OR CL SP OKMP OR INK LUE SEMP OINK UE S EMP O ever encountered anywhere SP EM K of Hall One at Kings Place R B L T NT DRINLUE S ONT E & D EDY CONT & DR Y B CON is one of the best I have D D D & D Y B S I C C F O O CO M U S I C F O O D O M E U S I C capital … the acoustics ‘the one of the jewels in ME MU A R T O L K L D M A R T L K C L D M cultural life of the RL DORD Z Z FWOR ORD Z F OWOR A Z N W R Y J I C A L EN W Y J A I C A L www.kingsplace.co.uk Kings Place 90 York Way London N1 9AG A R OR L A SSSP OK OR A L A SS K C E S E M P NK C ’ BLU ON T DRI in the world. C C D& Martino Tirimo 2010 US I F O O RT …

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