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GPI CES Power Point

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  • 1. Guide to Greener Electronics v.14 Quarterly assessment of environmental performance of market leaders in the electronics sector Casey Harrell
  • 2. Who is Greenpeace?
  • 3. Who is Greenpeace?
  • 4. Why target electronics?
  • 5. Version 14: December 2009
  • 6. Guide to Greener Electronics
    • Campaign tool to create demand for greener electronics by:
      • quarterly ranking major brands on toxic chemicals, e-waste and climate/energy policies and practices - a race to go green!
      • publicly communicating both positive and regressive individual company performance
      • providing consumer information to allow public to show their preference for truly green products
  • 7. Guide to Greener Electronics
    • The 18 companies in ranking are market leaders of mobile phones, PCs, TVs and game consoles
    • v.1 of the Guide was launched August 2006
    • In June 08 (v.8) toxic chemicals and e-waste criteria were tightened and climate/energy criteria added
    • In December 09 (v.14) toxic chemicals criterion tightened
  • 8. Key demands to brands 1. Phase out all hazardous chemicals based on the precautionary principle (Toxic chemicals) As 1 st step: substitute vinyl plastic (PVC) and all Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs) with a clear and reasonable time line 2. Take Back or Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR): Take responsibility for the full life cycle of your products; Take back end-of-life products and re-use/recycle responsibly (Waste) 3. Protect the climate: Limit your carbon footprint via absolute greenhouse gas cuts in operations, increased renewable energy use, strong climate advocacy & highly energy-efficient products (Energy)
  • 9. Key demands to brands
    • 5 criteria on toxic chemicals; double points for products on the market free of PVC and BFRs
    • 5 criteria on e-waste and recycling
    • 5 criteria on climate and energy; double points for energy efficient products
  • 10. Overarching criteria
    • Companies are scored on information that is publicly available and one-to-one dialogue/ communications with companies where clarification needed
    • Penalty Points for:
      • Breaking promises e.g. backtracking on commitments
      • Situation on the ground (scandals)
      • Double standards
      • Any other corporate misbehaviour e.g. lying
  • 11. Example of how it works Links to Corporate Website
  • 12. Guide to Greener Electronics - Progress
    • Created a race to the top – brands are highly competitive e.g. Dell was first PC brand to set timeline of end of 2009 for toxics elimination; this moved the PC sector
    • Improved transparency of corporate communications on environmental policies – still to improve on marketing of green attributes
  • 13. Guide to Greener Electronics - Progress
    • Dissolved the US-based lobby (ARF Coalition) against producer responsibility for e-waste and advocating for consumers to pay for recycling e-waste – in which Philips and Panasonic were key players
    Philips: place 17 -------> 15 -------------------------------> 4
  • 14. Green My Apple
    • Sept 06: launch of Apple campaign with demand to eliminate the most toxic substances and offer takeback/recycling globally
    • Over the next 7 months, cyberactions via greenmyapple.org, activities in London, Rome, New York…..
    • In May 2007 Jobs announces Apple will eliminate PVC and BFRs by end of 2008
    • All products are now free of PVC and BFRs (except power cords in some regions/PCs); takeback & recycling offered in countries where more than 95% of sales, incl. India and China
  • 15. Philips – simply take-back and recycle
    • Demands to Philips June 2008:
      • publicly commit to setting up a take-back system for its end-of-life electronic products globally
      • re-evaluate bad position on individual producer responsibility (IPR = financing real costs of recycling/treating its e-scrap from its own products)
    • Activities at AGM in Amsterdam, HQ, Moscow…..
    • Feb 2009: after other companies implement progressive take-back policies, Philips changes position too
    • Sept 2009: neutralized negative EU lobbying
  • 16. Version 14: December 2009 Position (x) v.13 ranking Company Score 1 (1) Nokia 7.3 2 (3) Sony Ericsson 6.9 3 (5) Toshiba 5.3 4 (4) Philips 5.3 5 (9) Apple 5.1 6 (11) LGE 6.1 – penalty = 5.1 7 (8) Sony 5.1 7 (6) Motorola 5.1 7 (2) Samsung 6.1 – penalty = 5.1
  • 17. Version 14: December 2009 Position Company Score 10 (10) Panasonic 4.9 11 (14) HP 4.7 12 (13) Acer 4.5 13 (7) Sharp 4.5 14 (12) Dell 4.9 – penalty = 3.9 15 (16) Fujitsu 3.5 16 (17) Lenovo 3.5 – penalty = 2.5 17 (15) Microsoft 2.4 18 (18) Nintendo 1.4
  • 18. v.14 ranking highlights
    • Apple, Sony Ericsson, Nokia now have all products on the market free of PVC and BFRs
    • In PC sector, besides Apple, HP has notebooks free of PVC and BFRs; Acer due to launch 2 models of PVC- and BFR-free notebooks by mid-January
    • Toshiba up from 5 th to 3 rd place: promises to deliver all consumer electronics free of PVC and BFRs by 1 April 2010
    • BUT
    • Backtracking on commitments to eliminate PVC and BFRs in all products: Samsung, Dell, Lenovo and LGE penalized
      • Samsung drops from 2 nd to tied 7 th place (BFRs by 2010)
  • 19. v.14 ranking highlights
    • CEMENTING THE CHANGE
    • Stricter criterion on chemicals requires companies to actively lobby for bans on PVC, BFRs and CFRs during EU RoHS law revision.
    • Sony Ericsson and Apple doing active lobby. Nokia and Acer half-way there. Big players - HP, Dell and Acer - need to do more
  • 20. The Future – Cool IT Challenge
    • – IT Climate Solutions can provide 15% of more of needed GHG reductions (Smart 2020)
    • – Corporate lobby for strong international agreements on climate reduction is needed
    • – Link environmental performance with profit
  • 21. ICT Solution Opportunities Transportation Dematerialization Buildings Information Mgmt Smartgrid Sub Sectors Integration/mgmt of Distrib Power Gen Facility Level GHG Mgmt Congestion Pricing/Mgmt Software for Demand Response Vehicle to Grid Charging/Storage Meeting Facilitation Software Vehicle to Grid Charging/Storage Software Social Networking for Ride/Car Sharing Remote Demand Mgmt PC Mfg Smart Meter Connectivity Telecom Distributed Storage Systems Real Time Trans Info Access to Low(er) Carbon Trans Alternatives Demand Response Integration w/IT Equip 3D Video Conf (HP) Cloud/Virtualization of Servers Wireless Grid Mgmt Building Energy Management High Efficient PCs Network Smart Appliances Route Planning /Goods Mgmt Desktop Virtualization Supply Chain Mgmt/ GHG Reporting GHG Mgmt Dashboards Cloud Server/Virtualization Software Route Planning /Goods Mgmt Tele- Conf Smart Parking Systems E-books, e-Music, Digital Photos, Paperless Workspace
  • 22. More information Casey Harrell Mob + 1 415 307 3382 [email_address]     Daniel Kessler Mob + 1 510 501 1779 [email_address]   www.greenpeace.org/ces www.greenpeace.org/rankingguide www.greenpeace.org/coolit

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