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Lecture#2
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Lecture#2

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  • 1. ART 101: <br />Introduction to Art <br />Visual Perception and<br />The Formal Properties of Art <br />James Greene | Visiting Assistant Professor | 1110 CAC | greenjam@gvsu.edu<br />
  • 2. Gestalt<br />gə-ˈstält ("form" or "whole”)<br /> A theory of mind and brain positing<br />that the operational principle of the brain is <br />holistic, parallel, and uses self-organizing tendencies, <br />OR:<br />The name applied to the notion that<br />the whole is different from the sum of its parts.<br />
  • 3. “Seeing the forest for the trees.”<br />
  • 4. Gestalt<br />The use of Gestalt principles factors heavily in our perception of art and design. Artists and designers use knowledge of our brains’ natural form-forming abilities to produce art and design that communicates effectively.<br />
  • 5. Gestalt<br />The key principles of Gestalt systems are:<br />Emergence<br />We do not recognize something or someone by first identifying its individual parts and then inferring what it is from those component parts. <br />Instead, we perceive it as a whole, all at once. <br />
  • 6.
  • 7. Gestalt<br />The key principles of Gestalt systems are:<br />Reification<br />The constructive or generative aspect of perception, by which the thing perceived contains moreexplicit spatial information than the sensory stimulus on which it is based. <br />
  • 8.
  • 9. Gestalt<br />The key principles of Gestalt systems are:<br />Multistability<br />The tendency of ambiguous perceptual experiences to pop back and forth unstably between two or more alternative interpretations. <br />
  • 10. NECKER CUBE<br />RUBIN’S VASE<br />Ambiguous Depth Figures<br />
  • 11.
  • 12. M.C. Escher, Circle Limit IV (Angels & Devils) 1960<br />
  • 13. Gestalt<br />The key principles of Gestalt systems are:<br />Invariance<br />The property of perception whereby simple geometrical objects are recognized independent of rotation, translation, and scale; as well as several other variations such as elastic deformations, different lighting, and different component features. <br />
  • 14.
  • 15. ART 101: <br />Introduction to Art <br />The Formal Elements of Art <br />James Greene | Visiting Assistant Professor | 1110 CAC | greenjam@gvsu.edu<br />
  • 16. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Line<br />Arturo Hererra, Untitled, wall painting, 2007.<br />
  • 17. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Line<br />Alexander Calder, Figures from Cirque de Calder, <br />Wire, wood, 1927 <br />Alexander Calder, Caricature Face Mobiles, <br />Wire, 1937.<br />
  • 18. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Line<br />(implied line)<br />Raphael <br />Crucifixion  <br />1502-03<br />Oil on panel<br />
  • 19. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space<br />SHAPE<br />Flat, 2-Dimensional Area<br />Measured in height and width<br />MASS<br />Solid, 3-Dimesional Volume<br />Measured in height, width and depth<br />
  • 20. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space<br />Figure/Ground Reversal<br />Demonstrates how our perception<br />depends on our recognition of the<br />spatial relationships between an <br />object and what lies beside and <br />behind it.<br />
  • 21. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />One-Point Perspective<br />Perugino, Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to Saint Peter<br />Fresco, Sistine Chapel (North Wall) 1480-82<br />
  • 22. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />One-Point Perspective<br />Perugino, Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to Saint Peter<br />Fresco, Sistine Chapel (North Wall) 1480-82 (perspective analysis)<br />
  • 23. Space:<br />Two-Point Perspective<br />The Formal Elements of Art<br />Gerrit Berckheyde The Exterior Of The Church Of Saint Bavo Oil on panel 1666.<br />
  • 24. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />Two+ Points Perspective<br />Gustave Caillebotte La Place de l’Europe, temps de pluie). <br />Oil on canvas. 1877.<br />
  • 25. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />Three-Point Perspective<br />MC Escher<br />Ascending and Descending<br />Lithograph<br />1960<br />
  • 26. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />Three-Point Perspective<br />
  • 27. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Space:<br />Aerial Perspective<br />Andrea Mategna, <br />LamentationOver <br />the Dead Christ,<br />Tempera on panel, <br />1480.<br />
  • 28. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Light: Value<br />The relative level of lightness or darkness of an area or an object.<br />
  • 29. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Chiarscuro<br />Technique used by artists to represent the gradual transition around<br />a curved surface from light to dark.<br />
  • 30. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />Ryan McGuinness, Untitled, Silkscreen print on vinyl, 2007.<br />
  • 31. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />Title<br />
  • 32. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />
  • 33. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />Title<br />
  • 34. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />ANALAGOUS COLOR SCHEME<br />Resulting from the use of several hues that lie next to each other on the hue wheel<br />
  • 35. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />COMPLIMENTARY COLOR SCHEME<br />Resulting from the use of hues that lie across from each other on the hue wheel<br />
  • 36. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />COMPLIMENTARY COLOR SCHEME<br />Resulting from the use of hues that lie across from each other on the hue wheel<br />
  • 37. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Color<br />COMPLIMENTARY COLOR SCHEME<br />Resulting from the use of hues that lie across from each other on the hue wheel<br />
  • 38. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Texture<br />Egyptian Bust of Khafre Old Kingdom, diorite.<br />
  • 39. The Formal Elements of Art<br />Texture<br />Max Ernst Surrealistic Landscape Oil on canvas 1927 <br />
  • 40. ART 101: <br />Introduction to Art <br />The Principles of Design<br />James Greene | Visiting Assistant Professor | 1110 CAC | greenjam@gvsu.edu<br />
  • 41. The Principles of Design<br />Balance<br />Notre Dame de Paris<br />Gothic Period<br />Paris, France<br />Completed c.1345<br />Symmetrical or Formal Balance: <br />When both sides of a composition mirror each other.<br />
  • 42. The Principles of Design<br />Balance<br />Paul Gauguin, Les Femmes De Tahiti, oil on canvas, 1891<br />Asymmetrical or Informal Balance: <br />When visual weight is well-distributed, but the two sides<br /> of the composition do not mirror each other. <br />
  • 43. Emphasis<br />The Principles of Design<br />Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, At the Moulin Rogue, oil on canvas, 1895<br />
  • 44. The Principles of Design<br />Focal Point<br />Rose Window, South Transept, <br />Chartres Cathedral, Chartres France c. 1215 <br />
  • 45. The Principles of Design<br />Scale<br />Hokusai The Great Wave Off Kanagawa from 36 Views of Mt. Fuji<br />woodcut, 1826-33<br />
  • 46. The Principles of Design<br />Proportion<br />Polykleitos<br />Doryphoros (The Spearbearer)<br />Roman marble copy of Greek bronze original<br />450-40 BC (original)<br />
  • 47. The Principles of Design<br />Proportion<br />Parthenon Athenos, Acropolis, Athens, Greece, <br />Classical Period, Completed 431 BC<br />
  • 48. The Principles of Design<br />Proportion<br />
  • 49. The Principles of Design<br />Repetition<br />Title<br />
  • 50. The Principles of Design<br />Rhythm<br />Bridget Riley<br />Drift #2<br />Silkscreen print<br />1966<br />Title<br />
  • 51. The Principles of Design<br />Unity<br />Pieter Bruegel the Elder NetherlandishProvebs tempera on panel1559 <br />
  • 52. The Principles of Design<br />Variety<br />Las Vegas Strip, ca. 1970<br />

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