Seeking Sustainability in an Era of Change

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Presentation given by Tim Quinn with the Association of California Water Agencies at the Session: "The Current State of Water: How did we get here" at the Great Valley Center's Sacramento Valley Forum on October 28, 2009 in Chico, CA.

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  • The Central Valley Project (CVP) was originally conceived as a State project to protect the Central Valley from crippling water shortages and devastating floods. The basic concept and facilities of today's massive project were included in the State Water Project formulated in the 1930's. In the depression era, however, the State was unable to finance the project. Most of the water development envisioned by the State was accomplished by the Federal CVP, beginning with its initial authorization in 1935. Work began in 1937 with the Contra Costa Canal which began delivering water in 1940. The next facility built was Shasta Dam, the keystone of the project. Work on the dam began in 1938, and water storage started even before its completion in 1945. Congress subsequently passed 13 separate measures to authorize the development of other major project facilities over the next 3 decades. The final dam, New Melones, was completed in 1979. EBMUD is formed in 1923. In 1929, water itself reached the East Bay Area when East Bay Municipal Utility District voters completed Pardee Dam and the 82-mile long Mokelumne Aqueduct. SWP - 1960 California voters approved the $1.75 billion Burns-Porter Act bond issue to begin building the State Water Project (SWP). The Project was designed and constructed by the Department of Water Resources. By 1973, the initial facilites were completed and water delivery to southern California began. 1971 On October 8, Governor Ronald Reagan starts the first pump at A.D. Edmonston Pumping Plant, as part of a ceremony celebrating the first water deliveries to Southern California. LADWP: In 1907, the voters of Los Angeles again gave their overwhelming endorsement to this project, approving a $23 million bond issue for aqueduct construction. The only task that remained was to build it.
  • Physical Changes to the Planet : Impacts of Climate Change Are Occurring Faster than Scientists Predicted Disappearing/melting Arctic Ice Cap (summer 2008) Link/Photos: http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/1118/csmimg/p16a.jpg http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ Floods in Atlanta, GA – After high temperatures and drought conditions plagued the region for the past __ years, parts of Georgia and Tennessee were deluged by 1 ft of water in less than 24 hours. Wastewater Treatment facility in Atlanta couldn’t operate – released raw sewage in public water ways. Record Drought in Australia Dust Storms in Sydney– worst dust storms in 70 years
  • Physical Changes to the Planet : Impacts of Climate Change Are Occurring Faster than Scientists Predicted Disappearing/melting Arctic Ice Cap (summer 2008) Link/Photos: http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/1118/csmimg/p16a.jpg http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ Floods in Atlanta, GA – After high temperatures and drought conditions plagued the region for the past __ years, parts of Georgia and Tennessee were deluged by 1 ft of water in less than 24 hours. Wastewater Treatment facility in Atlanta couldn’t operate – released raw sewage in public water ways. Record Drought in Australia Dust Storms in Sydney– worst dust storms in 70 years
  • The Central Valley Project (CVP) was originally conceived as a State project to protect the Central Valley from crippling water shortages and devastating floods. The basic concept and facilities of today's massive project were included in the State Water Project formulated in the 1930's. In the depression era, however, the State was unable to finance the project. Most of the water development envisioned by the State was accomplished by the Federal CVP, beginning with its initial authorization in 1935. Work began in 1937 with the Contra Costa Canal which began delivering water in 1940. The next facility built was Shasta Dam, the keystone of the project. Work on the dam began in 1938, and water storage started even before its completion in 1945. Congress subsequently passed 13 separate measures to authorize the development of other major project facilities over the next 3 decades. The final dam, New Melones, was completed in 1979. EBMUD is formed in 1923. In 1929, water itself reached the East Bay Area when East Bay Municipal Utility District voters completed Pardee Dam and the 82-mile long Mokelumne Aqueduct. SWP - 1960 California voters approved the $1.75 billion Burns-Porter Act bond issue to begin building the State Water Project (SWP). The Project was designed and constructed by the Department of Water Resources. By 1973, the initial facilites were completed and water delivery to southern California began. 1971 On October 8, Governor Ronald Reagan starts the first pump at A.D. Edmonston Pumping Plant, as part of a ceremony celebrating the first water deliveries to Southern California. LADWP: In 1907, the voters of Los Angeles again gave their overwhelming endorsement to this project, approving a $23 million bond issue for aqueduct construction. The only task that remained was to build it.
  • Seeking Sustainability in an Era of Change

    1. 1. Seeking Sustainability in an Era of Change Timothy Quinn Executive Director October 28, 2009 Great Valley Center – Sacramento Valley Forum
    2. 2. Headlines
    3. 3. How Could This Have Happened? John Bidwell
    4. 4. How Could This Have Happened? Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Los Angeles Aqueduct 1913 San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Hetch Hetchy System 1913 - Raker Act East Bay Municipal Utility District Mokelumne River Aqueduct 1929 Metropolitan Water District of Southern California Colorado River Aqueduct 1941 US Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project 1940 - 1st water delivered (Contra Costa Canal) CA Department of Water Resources State Water Project 1960 - Burns Porter Act 1973 - 1st water to So.Cal. Pardee Reservoir Shasta Dam FDR 1928 - Inaugural MWD Board Meeting Huntington Hotel Governor Pat Brown Harvey O. Banks Los Angeles Aqueduct Hetch Hetchy System Mokelumne River Aqueduct SWP CVP Colorado River Aqueduct William Mulholland Fred Eaton
    5. 5. MANAGING WATER IS MANAGING CHANGE Legal Decisions Endangered Species Wild & Scenic Rivers Acts 1957 Plan CVPIA Clean Water Act
    6. 6. Modern Values, Modern Solutions 20 th century solutions focused on resource extraction for utilitarian purposes. 21 st century solutions must invest in sustainability for the environment and economy ACWA Board William Mulholland Pardee Dam dedication M. M. O’Shaughnessy Harvey O. Banks US Capitol Bi-partisan leaders CA Legislature
    7. 7. Era of Conflict 1850 1900 1950 2000 Westward Focus Water and Power Development Environmental Priorities Era of Conflict
    8. 8. Where California Water Policy is Being Made Today
    9. 9. The Real Economic Consequences
    10. 10. The Real Economic Consequences
    11. 11. Call for Action on Water Now!
    12. 12. Turning the Corner? Delta Vision Blue Ribbon Task Force Bay-Delta Conservation Plan Public Policy Institute of California
    13. 13. Turning the Corner? Steinberg Cogdill Huffman Bass Hollingsworth Blakeslee
    14. 14. Climate Change Occurring Faster than Predicted Six Flags Amusement Park, Atlanta, Georgia – 9/21/2009 Disappearing Arctic Ice Record Drought in Australia Thawing Permafrost
    15. 15. Climate Change Intensifies Familiar Challenges Changes in snow pack reduces effective storage
    16. 16. Climate Change Intensifies Familiar Challenges Changing runoff patterns increases flood risks.
    17. 17. Climate Change Intensifies Familiar Challenges Sea level rise puts some water infrastructure at risk Mean Sea level at Golden Gate Bridge
    18. 18. What Does All This Mean for This Generation of Water Managers?
    19. 19. <ul><li>Rice = Habitat </li></ul>Coequal Goals Phase 8
    20. 20. Coequal Goals
    21. 21. <ul><li>Substantial increase in investments </li></ul><ul><li>Moving investments outdoors </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated resource management </li></ul>Intensify Local Resource Investments MWD of Southern California
    22. 22. Improved Efficiency in Industry & Agriculture
    23. 23. Reinventing Infrastructure: Delta Conveyance
    24. 24. Reinventing Infrastructure: Additional Water Storage
    25. 25. We Are More Interdependent: Increased Reliance on the Market
    26. 26. We Need to Change How We Use Energy Pumps to Plant Start Lake Water Treatment Plant Pumps to Distribution System Pumps to Plant End Users Wastewater Treatment Plant Discharge to River or ocean
    27. 27. We Need to Change How We Use Energy
    28. 28. Institutional Models Will Fade Flood Management Watershed Management Waste Water MWD of Southern California
    29. 29. Watershed Management Will Be More Important
    30. 30. New Information and Methods of Analysis Mean Sea level at Golden Gate Bridge
    31. 31. We Inherited a Legacy What will be our legacy to the next generation? John Bidwell 1928 - Inaugural MWD Board Meeting Huntington Hotel Governor Pat Brown Harvey O. Banks William Mulholland Fred Eaton
    32. 32. Questions? Timothy Quinn Executive Director 916.441.4545 [email_address] Association of California Water Agencies www.acwa.com

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