Child Care Enhancement Program (CCEP) Administered by the Michigan Department of Community Health Mental Health Services t...
Agenda <ul><li>What is CCEP? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is CCEP needed? </li></ul><ul><li>CCEP services and eligibility criteri...
What is the Child Care  Enhancement Program? <ul><li>A statewide mental health consultation program assists families and c...
What is Social and Emotional Health? <ul><li>Within the context of one’s  family,  community and  cultural  background it ...
Why is Social & Emotional Health  So Important? <ul><li>It helps infants and toddlers learn the skills necessary to succee...
Michigan Department of Human Services (Child Care Development Fund dollars) Grant Manager Michigan Department of Community...
CCEP as Part of the  Great Start System
Why is CCEP Needed? <ul><li>Young children are being expelled from child care at 3 times the rate of children expelled fro...
CCEP Services <ul><li>Level One-Prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Level Two-Prevention Plus </li></ul><ul><li>Level Three-Inten...
Level One - Prevention <ul><li>Consultant available to families and child care providers for confidential support related ...
Eligibility for CCEP Services Level One <ul><li>Must be a parent of a child birth to 36 months who is receiving or eligibl...
Level Two - Prevention Plus <ul><li>Child/Family Consultation   The consultant does an intake, opens a case (e.g. consent ...
Eligibility for CCEP Services  Level Two <ul><li>A. Child-Family Centered Consultation   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be a C...
Eligibility for CCEP Services  Level Two <ul><li>B.  Open-Ended Group Consultation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provider cares fo...
Level Three - Intensive Consultation <ul><li>The consultant does: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An intake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Eligibility for CCEP Services  Level Three <ul><ul><li>Must be a Child Care Provider (Licensed Day care center or Day Care...
Why Refer Infants and Toddlers to CCEP? <ul><li>Social, emotional and behavioral problems can get in the way of learning. ...
Possible Reasons to Refer an Infant to CCEP <ul><li>Infant: </li></ul><ul><li>Shows little preference for any particular a...
Possible Reasons to Refer a Toddler to CCEP <ul><li>Shows any of the behaviors listed under the Infant on the previous sli...
What Causes These Behaviors? The reasons are different for every child!
Some Reasons for  Challenging Behavior <ul><li>Examples of more common reasons: </li></ul><ul><li>Caregiving environment l...
CCEP Team as Detectives! <ul><li>The family, caregiver and consultant  partner  to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Figure out what ...
What do the Children  Say About CCEP? I Love my primary Caregiver, how about a hug! Do you want to play?
What do the Parents  Say About CCEP? On average parents rated their satisfaction of CCEP services as 3.83% out of a 4 poin...
How to Contact a CCEP Program
Questions and Answers
For More Information About CCEP <ul><li>Contact: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mary Mackrain, State Program Director at: </li></ul...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

CCEP

1,287 views
1,186 views

Published on

Child Care Enhancement Program

Published in: Education, Self Improvement
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,287
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
46
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Before the definition rolls out ask people what SE health is to them- flip chart their answers. Roll the definition out. Tell participants that this is a definition that was created during a statewide workgroup on SE health that was made up of MIAIMH members, parents, caregivers, CCEP people, etc. This is the common definition being used in the state. Tell them we want to break it down a bit together so we are all on the same page in talking about what SE health really is.
  • Now that we know what SE health is- why is it important? From DCH booklet: (pg. 4) At birth an infants brain has about 100 billion nerve cells- that have not yet formed critical connections- research shows that these connections are primarily formed by attentive care and nurturing stimulation from the outside world. Can add more here from the book. Generate some group feedback and then go into these research bullets: Relationships are the building blocks for healthy development in all areas. Research shows that critical brain connections in the early years are primarily formed by attentive care and nurturing stimulation by caregivers. It is within the security of relationships that an infant or toddler feels safe and confident and able to explore the world with enthusiasm and curiosity.
  • CCEP

    1. 1. Child Care Enhancement Program (CCEP) Administered by the Michigan Department of Community Health Mental Health Services to Children and Families Funded by the Michigan Department of Human Services
    2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>What is CCEP? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is CCEP needed? </li></ul><ul><li>CCEP services and eligibility criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>How to refer to CCEP. </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons to refer to CCEP. </li></ul>
    3. 3. What is the Child Care Enhancement Program? <ul><li>A statewide mental health consultation program assists families and child care providers to support the social and emotional health of children birth up to 36 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by the Department of Human Services, Administered by the Michigan Department of Community Health. </li></ul>
    4. 4. What is Social and Emotional Health? <ul><li>Within the context of one’s family, community and cultural background it is the child’s developing capacity to: </li></ul><ul><li>Experience and regulate emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Form secure relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Explore and learn </li></ul><ul><li>Definition adapted from Zero to Three </li></ul>
    5. 5. Why is Social & Emotional Health So Important? <ul><li>It helps infants and toddlers learn the skills necessary to succeed in school and life; </li></ul><ul><li>Try new things </li></ul><ul><li>Solve Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Pay attention to the teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Calm down when upset without hurting others </li></ul>
    6. 6. Michigan Department of Human Services (Child Care Development Fund dollars) Grant Manager Michigan Department of Community Health Mental Health Services to Children and Families State Administrator Community Mental Health Services Programs Subcontract with MDCH to provide regional CCEP services to children 0-36 months/families with child care subsidy. <ul><li>CCEP State Level Staff </li></ul><ul><li>Program Director </li></ul><ul><li>State TA Coordinator </li></ul>Services Level 1 Prevention: Informal Mental Health Consultation Level 2 Prevention Plus: Basic/Short-term Mental Health Consultation A. Child/Family Centered Consultation B. Open-Ended Group Consultation (informal providers only) Level 3 Intensive Mental Health Consultation Great Start Child Care and Early Learning Resource and Support Center <ul><li>Great Start Child Care and Early Learning Regional Resource Center </li></ul><ul><li>Identify early care and education partners to attend training-for-trainers on CSEFEL Infant Toddler social-emotional health curriculum (made possible through a Head Start-State Collaboration Office/CCEP agreement) </li></ul><ul><li>Increase awareness of CCEP Program </li></ul><ul><li>Increase awareness of CCEP get-togethers for informal providers </li></ul><ul><li>Assist in locating sites for CCEP get-togethers </li></ul><ul><li>Serve in a CCEP advisory capacity </li></ul>CCEP Flow Chart FY10
    7. 7. CCEP as Part of the Great Start System
    8. 8. Why is CCEP Needed? <ul><li>Young children are being expelled from child care at 3 times the rate of children expelled from K-12, and 3-5 times for children of color (Gilliam, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>One in five children enters kindergarten with poor social development skills: it’s difficult for them to join others in play; they don’t have the ability to make and keep friends; and they do not positively interact with their peers (Raver and Knitzer 2002). </li></ul>
    9. 9. CCEP Services <ul><li>Level One-Prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Level Two-Prevention Plus </li></ul><ul><li>Level Three-Intensive Consultation </li></ul>
    10. 10. Level One - Prevention <ul><li>Consultant available to families and child care providers for confidential support related to children’s social, emotional and behavioral challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>Case not opened, child not identified. </li></ul><ul><li>Support via the phone, e-mail or in-person. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Eligibility for CCEP Services Level One <ul><li>Must be a parent of a child birth to 36 months who is receiving or eligible to receive DHS child care subsidy. </li></ul><ul><li>Must be a Child Care Provider (Licensed Day Care Center or Day Care Group Home, Registered Day Care Family Home or DHS Enrolled Relative). </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Must serve children birth up to 36 months. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Must serve children who are receiving the DHS child care subsidy. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Level Two - Prevention Plus <ul><li>Child/Family Consultation The consultant does an intake, opens a case (e.g. consent is signed), conducts onsite observation and assessment, and facilitates development of a Positive Child Guidance Plan, which likely includes referral to other services. Generally, length of service is up to 3 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Open-Ended Group Consultation (informal providers only). The consultant facilitates ongoing (at least monthly) “get-togethers” for informal providers addressing social-emotional health topics identified by providers. “Get-togethers” are informal and held at non-threatening community sites. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Eligibility for CCEP Services Level Two <ul><li>A. Child-Family Centered Consultation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be a Child Care Provider (Licensed Day Care Center or Day Care Group Home, Registered Day Care Family Home or DHS Enrolled Relative). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child must be birth up to 36 months at the time of referral. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child must be receiving or eligible to receive DHS child care subsidy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents must consent for services. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Eligibility for CCEP Services Level Two <ul><li>B. Open-Ended Group Consultation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provider cares for a child birth up to 36 months at the time of referral. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Child(ren) cared for must be receiving or eligible to receive DHS child care subsidy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Provider must be a DHS-enrolled </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>relative provider or day care aide. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Level Three - Intensive Consultation <ul><li>The consultant does: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An intake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opens a case (consent is signed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conducts onsite observation and assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitates development of a Positive Child Guidance Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assists with implementation of the Plan through coaching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May do training for the child care staff related to the child’s behavior (e.g. biting, withdrawal, excessive crying, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generally, length of service is from 3 to 6 months, although it may exceed 6 months if necessary. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Services are prioritized to informal providers </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Eligibility for CCEP Services Level Three <ul><ul><li>Must be a Child Care Provider (Licensed Day care center or Day Care Group Home, Registered Day Care Family Home or DHS enrolled relative). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child must be birth up to 36 months at the time of referral. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child must be receiving or eligible to receive DHS child care subsidy. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>(same eligibility criteria as Level Two A. Child and Family Centered Consultation) </li></ul>
    17. 17. Why Refer Infants and Toddlers to CCEP? <ul><li>Social, emotional and behavioral problems can get in the way of learning. </li></ul><ul><li>The sooner we find out what is causing a behavior problem, the easier it is to help the child. Then the child can get back to his “job”- playing and learning! </li></ul><ul><li>Informal providers who join the get-togethers can talk to others who do the same work. They can share tips, problems and solutions! </li></ul>
    18. 18. Possible Reasons to Refer an Infant to CCEP <ul><li>Infant: </li></ul><ul><li>Shows little preference for any particular adult </li></ul><ul><li>Resists holding </li></ul><ul><li>Cries for prolonged periods </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely makes eye contact with others </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t show interest in people or things going on around him or her </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t respond to simple games like peek-a-boo </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t smile; often appears sad </li></ul><ul><li>Shows any loss of language or social skills </li></ul>
    19. 19. Possible Reasons to Refer a Toddler to CCEP <ul><li>Shows any of the behaviors listed under the Infant on the previous slide </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibits inappropriate aggressive behaviors (e.g., biting, hitting, kicking, tantrums) </li></ul><ul><li>Has no real fear of danger </li></ul><ul><li>Has a very high activity level </li></ul><ul><li>Fixates on a single object </li></ul><ul><li>Makes repetitive body motions such as rocking or hand-flapping </li></ul><ul><li>Has sleeping difficulties </li></ul><ul><li>Shows little preference for any particular adult </li></ul><ul><li>Shows no fear of strangers </li></ul><ul><li>Does not turn to familiar adults for comfort or help </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibits significant language delays, especially: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No single words by 16 months </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No two-word spontaneous phrases by 24 months (although may be repeating words over and over) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    20. 20. What Causes These Behaviors? The reasons are different for every child!
    21. 21. Some Reasons for Challenging Behavior <ul><li>Examples of more common reasons: </li></ul><ul><li>Caregiving environment lacks consistent nurturing </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of continuity of care between child care and home </li></ul><ul><li>Child’s difficulty with communication/speech </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental surge </li></ul><ul><li>Temperament differences between caregiver and child </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of less common reasons: </li></ul><ul><li>Prenatal exposure to substances </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory processing challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Autism Spectrum Disorders </li></ul><ul><li>Medical issues </li></ul><ul><li>Severe chronic stress (e.g. extreme poverty, family violence, chronic neglect, maternal depression) </li></ul>
    22. 22. CCEP Team as Detectives! <ul><li>The family, caregiver and consultant partner to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Figure out what reasons are behind the challenging behavior. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make a plan to help the adults to support the child based on these reasons. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Take action on the plan and see if it works! </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. What do the Children Say About CCEP? I Love my primary Caregiver, how about a hug! Do you want to play?
    24. 24. What do the Parents Say About CCEP? On average parents rated their satisfaction of CCEP services as 3.83% out of a 4 point scale - with 4 being “very satisfied” <ul><li>I want my child to be…….. </li></ul>Happy Loved Secure
    25. 25. How to Contact a CCEP Program
    26. 26. Questions and Answers
    27. 27. For More Information About CCEP <ul><li>Contact: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mary Mackrain, State Program Director at: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mackrain@aol.com, 248/594-3250 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ren é Beyette, Early Childhood Consultant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>231-947-2255 x 8145 </li></ul></ul>

    ×