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NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
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NC-Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline

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Presentation to NC Head Start and Early Head Start Directors delineating the need for highly qualified bilingual staff and an alternative plan to attract and recruit needed staff.

Presentation to NC Head Start and Early Head Start Directors delineating the need for highly qualified bilingual staff and an alternative plan to attract and recruit needed staff.

Published in: Education, Travel
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  • The nation’s racial and ethnic minority groups, especially Hispanics are growing more rapidly than the non-Hispanic white population, fueled by both immigration and births.Members of minority groups account for 49.7% of children younger than age 5 - 36.6% of the total population.
  • Although not the largest state with a percentage of Hispanics living in NC it is one of the fastest growing.Show where Hispanics are settlingWhat is so significant about North Carolina????
  • each year over the last five years there has been a 30% growth in terms of enrollment in our Head Start programs. Regional – everyday programs - traditional HS/EHS programs – the 30% growth – doesn’t include Tribal – Native American or Migrant Seasonal HS
  • Highlight 50%Sampson – 94%
  • Qualified Bilingual and Culturally Competent ProvidersIn order for children of immigrants to experience quality early education and to enhanceacademic and school readiness outcomes, bilingual and bicultural providers are essential. Many immigrant families are seeking programs with staff that reflect their language and culture. Yet, our research found the following:Multilingual and multicultural capacity is in short supply
  • http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/eecd/Dual%20Language%20Learners%20and%20Their%20Families/Learning%20in%20Two%20Languages/DualLanguageLea.htm
  • http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/eecd/Dual%20Language%20Learners%20and%20Their%20Families/Learning%20in%20Two%20Languages/DualLanguageLea.htmEMPHASIS: the NCHSSCO is assisting with this top finding – giving programs a medium to recruit and retain qualified bilingual staffSuccessfully serving young children and their families from various languages cannot happen with a program-wide comprehensive plan
  • HEAD START ACT – LAW – The Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007MUST LEGALLY DoPerformance standards are the guidelines to follow the ACT – to implement act
  • Rhetorical Questions or survey participantsIn SC, a program is up for recompetiton because that did not meet the needs of the aforementioned standards.
  • THIS HAS BEEN THE CULTURE OF HEAD START!!!!! WE ARE GOING TO CONTINUE TO OPERATE IN THAT VAIN TO MEET THE CHANGING NEEDS OF HS PROGRAMS – THAT IS WHAT WE DO IN HEAD START -
  • Puerto Rican - Consultant – uncg – worked HS across the nation
  • IF WE COULD HAVE DONE IT WE WOULD HAVE DONE IT BY NOW – WE MUST DARE TO DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT.It is insanity to keep doing the same thing and expecting different results.This plan is BOLD – DARING – INNOVATIVE – Requires a business mindset, hs IS NOT A “MOM AND POP” structure, we are in the business of educating children and families. The optimal word being business. As we move forward we ak that you keep and open mind and understand that the long=term benefits will outweigh any costs exoerienced and we will in detail delineate the costs and benefits of this infrastructure project.
  • A proactive approach that offers year-round opportunities to bilingual Spanish teachers/Family Service Workers by accessing Puerto Rico’s supply talentCreating another medium by which you can recruit bilingual staff. You would advertise in PR just like you do now..we are expanding your recruting area. The approach and design can be tailored to meet your current Human Resource/Personnel practices. Therefore, no two program appraches would look the same since we are structured differently and have varying HR policies and practices.
  • According to a study conducted by the Center for Social and Demographic Analysis, children in immigrant families in North Carolina are less likely than in native-born families, to be enrolled in Pre-K/nursery school at age 3 (22% vs. 37%) and at age 4 (45% vs. 60%). TAKE AWAY – Perhaps that we are not experiencing as many as we can.BUT THIS PROJECT SERVES NOT ONLY IMMIGRANTSAt age 3, the proportion of children in immigrant families enrolled in preschool programs declines from 39% for those with English fluent parents only to 9% for those with English language learner parents only. Similarly, at age 4, the proportion enrolled declines across the parental language groups. Among children in immigrant families with origins in Mexico, enrollment in early education programs is even lower at age 3 (9%) and age 4 (39%). Cultural preferences are cited as one of the main reasons for lower enrollment in early education programs among immigrant groups, particularly among Hispanics.Pipe Line would eliminate that barrier
  • Don’t need work visa or passportsSo why come to the US?? – High Unemployment – can’t find employment opportunities - many are working in professions outside of their major and making less money than a teacher./FSW salaries.NC Spanish speaking population growthLimited availability of bilingual professionals in early childhood educationLack of parental experience in US educational system Low cultural understanding at early childhood education agencies across North CarolinaA suitable opportunity for North Carolina Head Start programs to make cost-effective efforts to find new and innovative strategies to recruit bilingual professionals that could assist overcome these challenges.
  • MENTION SC PROGRAM - RECOMPETINGContinues development of first or home languagesGives the children access to opportunities for learning in the early years by building on knowledge and competencies that the children have already developed Essential for children to feel valued and accepted in all early childhood settings.Early childhood educators who speak more than one language and are culturally knowledgeable are an invaluable resource in the early childhood setting.Early childhood educators who speak more than one language and are culturally knowledgeable are an invaluable resource in the early childhood setting.These culturally competent educators possess an understanding of socio-cultural and economic issues relevant within the local linguistically and culturally diverse community Relation to parent-teacher and family–school–community partnerships, communication is the critical factor in NC Head StartSupports the development a positive self-conceptSpeaking the first language well helps strengthen relationships within the family continuing to speak the first language
  • 1st to go to college – require some work on the front end – if you as directors can get through this…the rate of return is greater!!!! It far exceeds the initial investment on the front end.
  • PREACH!Extend an invitation to utilize this new resource from the NC HSSCOThis is for the 2012 school year
  • This is for the 2012 school yearNC HSSCO not providing funding to hire – providing access to a pool of highly qualified candidates in which currently you do not have access. Wat they are paying for is the consulting services that will be in place to support potential candidates – at minimum a yeaApproach is tailored made to program – it is not a one size fits all – implementation will be different but access the sameTailored made
  • Transcript

    • 1. .North Carolina Head Start Association Directors’ Caucus June 14, 2012 Courtyard Marriott, Wilmington, N.C. Welcome!
    • 2. A New Day and Time in NC HS/EHS Programs Company Meeting the growing demand of serving LOGO Latino/Hispanic Children and Families Presented by the 2012 Special Projects Interns for the NC Head Start State Collaboration Office
    • 3. Today’s PresentersMiranda R. Dalton Shanina Doe Jason MayRockingham County HS Family Service HS Family, Infant, and Preschool Program Early Head Start
    • 4. A New Day and Time in NC HS/EHS Programs Company Meeting the growing demand of serving LOGO Latino/Hispanic Children and Families Presented by the 2012 Special Projects Interns for the NC Head Start State Collaboration Office
    • 5. Trending Data – National PerspectiveThe Hispanic population is growing more rapidly than the non- Hispanic white population.
    • 6. Trending Data – State Perspective
    • 7. Trending Data – North Carolina Perspective 2000 • Total Hispanics – 378,963 – 5% of population • Total Hispanics – 800,120 – 8% of population 2010 • Increase of 421,157 %CHANGE • 111% change
    • 8. Trending Data – NC Head Start Perspective
    • 9. NC HS/EHS Programs 2010/2011 PIR Hispanic Enrollment at 25% or Higher Cluster A Cluster B Cluster C Cluster E Cluster EDuplin Co. Schools Operation Breakthrough Bethlehem Center Intermountain Children MACFC ServicesPender Co. Schools Sampson Co. Gov. Rockingham Co. Mountain Projects Polk Co. Schools Govt. Person Co. Schools Regional Consolidated Community Action Catawba Co. Schools Services Opportunities Johnston-Lee-Harnett Cabarrus Co. Schools McDowell Co. Schools WCCA CH-Carrboro City Schools Kannapolis City Alexander Co. Schools Schools Telamon Corp. YVEDDI BROC CH-TOP Family Services Inc. BRCA Durham Partnership for Macon Program for Children Progress Sampson Co. Partnership Asheville City Schools for Children
    • 10. Barriers or Challenges1. The pool of highly qualified multilingual/multicultural staff is in short supply.2. Barriers to recruiting, training and retaining well-credentialed HS/EHS staff who are bilingual.3. A need for additional training and PD opportunities for Head Start staff.
    • 11. Office of Head Start (OHS) In the winter of 2005-2006, conducted a review of program needs with respect toserving young dual language learners, ages birth to five years.
    • 12. The Findings: HS PROGRAMS REPORTED…. having great difficulty finding, attracting, and retaining qualified bilingual staff in early childhood education. That serving young children and their families from various languages cannot happen successfully without a program-North Carolina- wide comprehensive plan. Puerto Rico Struggling with how best to support young English learners as they transition into or out of the Head Start Workforce program. Pipeline Struggling with knowing how best to promote children’s language acquisition.
    • 13. Fact or Fiction?Head Start programs must demonstrate thatchildren who are dual language learnersmake progress in both acquiring theknowledge and skills described in the HeadStart Child Development and EarlyLanguage Framework and the acquisition ofEnglish.FACT – 642(f)(10)
    • 14. Fact or Fiction?Head Start programs must hireteachers/home visitors who have the requiredqualifications, training and experience. FACT 648A(a)(3)(B)(i) 648A(a)(3)(B)(ii) 648A(a)(3)(B)(iii) 645A(h)(1) 1304.52(f)
    • 15. Fact or Fiction?Head Start programs must have at least oneclassroom staff member or home visitor whospeaks the same language as the majority ofchildren in the classroom and interacting on aregular basis.FACT – 1304.52(g)(2)
    • 16. More More Hispanic Hispanic Families Students Limited Bilingual Staff There is a definite need in our Head Start programs to employ highly qualified BILINGUAL STAFF in the areas ofteaching, family service workers/advocates and administrators
    • 17. Food For ThoughtHow many of us are currently meeting those standards?Is it a challenge from a Human Resource perspective tomeet those standards?Is it a challenge from a financial perspective to meet thosestandards?
    • 18. Meeting the NeedINNOVATION, LEADERSHIP AND CREATIVITY AT ITS BEST!
    • 19. The North Carolina – Puerto Rico Head Start “Workforce Pipeline”
    • 20. The North Carolina-Puerto Rico “Workforce Pipeline” THE PLANA proactive approach that offers year-round opportunities to attract highly qualifiedbilingual Spanish Teachers/Family Service Workers/Managers by accessing Puerto Rico’s supply talent.
    • 21. Accessing Puerto Rico’s Supply Talent
    • 22. Cultural Challenges in Early Childhood Children of Cultural preferencesImmigrants are less are cited as one of likely to enroll in the main reasons for early childhood lower enrollment programs
    • 23. Why Puerto Rico?• People born in Puerto Rico are also considered native born- U.S. citizens by birth.• 60% of Puerto Ricans speak English proficiently.• As a U.S. territory, Puerto Rico operates HS/EHS programs. Potential candidates will have knowledge and/or experience with Head Start.• Puerto Ricans have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall.• Vast number of Puerto Ricans are graduating with bachelor and/or graduate degrees in Early Childhood Education, but no employment opportunities available in PR.
    • 24. The Benefits of Participation NC-PR Well BetterHead Start Better Compliance Qualified ServiceWorkforce Outcomes with HSPS Staff Delivery Pipeline
    • 25. Cost - Benefit Analysis Costs BenefitsShort Term Investment Will Lead to Long Lasting Results
    • 26. Think Differently – It’s What We Do! Lyndon B. Johnson: “War on Poverty”/ Project Head Start Richard Nixon: Head Start mandated to serve children with disabilitiesIt will require NC Head Richard Nixon: First Performance Standards were published and the review process was Start programs to begun THINK George Bush: Head Start/State Collaboration DIFFERENTLY Projects begun NC Head Start programs with multiple funding streams. NC Head Start: North Carolina/Puerto Rico Workforce Pipeline
    • 27. The North Carolina-Puerto Rico Workforce PipelineGET OUT OF THE BOXNew Challenges require NEW THINKING!!
    • 28. A New Day and Time in NC HS/HS Programs Company Meeting the growing demand of serving LOGO Latino/Hispanic Children and Families Presented by the 2012 Special Projects Interns for the NC Head Start State Collaboration Office

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