Moving ohio forward grant program for demolition funding piqua
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Moving ohio forward grant program for demolition funding piqua

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Second workshop held in Piqua, Ohio for the Attorney General's office of grant funding for demolition.

Second workshop held in Piqua, Ohio for the Attorney General's office of grant funding for demolition.

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  • Image courtesy of Millie Davis, Greater Ohio 2009 staffer
  • The Office of Attorney General Mike DeWine has contracted with GOPC to advise communities on their Strategic Plan (Application Attachment 3) and Site Eligibility, as they develop, finalize, and submit their Application under the AG’s Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program. GOPC is holding this workshop on behalf of the Attorney General’s office.GOPC is contracted to provide advice and guidance to communities. We will not complete or submit applications for applicants.
  • Let’s talk big picture, basic rules to the program.
  • We will now walk through Attachment 3 the community strategic plan.
  • Besides the summary document at the front of the application, this is the real meat of the application. The purpose of Attachment 3 is to specifically identify procedures and processes the applicant will undertake to 1). Choose which buildings to demolish; 2). Establish how demolition activities will impact neighborhoods; 3). Engage various stakeholders; 4). Ensure contractors are selected fairly; and 5). Indicate how vacant land will be utilized. Through these five components, applicants should further demonstrate their capacity to use funding in a timely manner and stress the importance of collaboration with other sub-recipients.
  • The Attorney General recommends applicants answer these questions when writing Section 1 of Attachment. These questions will help establish the criteria communities will use to determine which buildings will be demolished. This criteria will help explain why building A instead of building B is slated for demolition.
  • Even with the guides outlined by the Attorney General’s office, demolition decisions will not be clear-cut.Establishing a decision process that accounts for a range of factors will help communities make transparent, defensible decisions that have outsized impacts on the block, neighborhood or community.
  • To help establish a decision process and complete section 1, GOPC suggests applicants consider the following factors in developing criteria for building demolition: One, what is the impact of vacant properties on neighboring property values.If one house can negatively impact neighboring houses by 2.2%. Imagine what the impact of 3 vacant houses are on the block’s sale prices. By demolishing a vacant home, the median sales price of a neighboring home can increase by $1,340.If the home had been tax delinquent, foreclosed and vacant prior to demolishment the median sales price can increaseby $15,000.
  • Another criteria might be the environmental and health impacts on nearby residences.
  • Another criteria might be the public safety and security impact on nearby residences.
  • Another criteria might be cost of rehab and the marketability of a renovated home.
  • Lucas County land bank only acquires properties and demolishes properties that have an identified end-user to them. They will not take title on a property unless they have someone lined up who will claim responsibility for property. This practice could be replicated with the Atty Gen funding and help guide decisions on which buildings should be prioritized to come down.
  • Once a community decides on how it might prioritize criteria for demolition decisions, the community can start to weigh Building A against Building B by quantifying information about each property.For example: buildings with more than 5 police calls per year and that have be cited as a public nuisance should be top candidates for demolition.
  • For Questions 2 in the Attachment, the Attorney General requests applicants demonstrate failed market conditions of target area and its relation to the rest of the surrounding community with the follow criteria as a guide.Basically put these vacant and abandoned properties and demolition decisions in context. Comprehensive Plan, CHIS, Strategic Plans can all guide communities in deciding where to focus demolition. These plans may identify specific neighborhoods that the jurisdiction has identified for stabilization or redevelopment. Or these plans might outline specific community priorities that demolition can help advance.In other words, the Attorney General wants to know what do you have on paper?If you don’t have it on paper, but there are discussions among community leaders—both public, private and nonprofit—these discussions can also help guide where demolition might be targeted. These discussions should be captured here in this section.
  • In small and rural communities, demolition can advance a comprehensive plan or help establish a strategic plan.
  • Similarly, in suburban and urban communities, demolition can advance a comprehensive plan or help establish a strategic plan.
  • These activities may be part of an official plan or part of a less formal plan that is driven by citizens, nonprofits or the private sector.
  • We at GO like the concept of TNI to help guide decision making. Often TNI gives priority to certain neighborhoods in terms of finances, support services, private investments, nonprofit investment, and other resources.Broadly, we define neighborhoods into three different types to help determine where to target neighborhood investments:Strong neighborhoods are those that have low vacancy and abandonment rates and strong housing markets. Tipping point neighborhoods are locales are those that are beginning to experience an increase in vacancy rates, some blighted homes, and a weakening housing market. However, the neighborhood still enjoys some vitality- through strong neighborhood groups and associations, and land-reuse potential. Severely challenged neighborhoods are those that have experienced severe disinvestment- they may have over a 50% vacancy rate, and a drastic drop in median home values.In many cases, investments targeted to tipping point neighborhoods have outsized impacts. Targeting resources to severely challenged neighborhoods can be effective—for example the turnaround occurring in Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood—but those kinds of investments are resource heavy and take time. For demolition funds, they probably will be most impactful in neighborhoods where removal of buildings are likely to help stabile neighborhood conditions and property values and create potential reuse opportunities.
  • To be explicit, Severely distressed neighborhoods face so many challenges that demolition alone may not be enough to overcome the legacy of disinvestment. However, demolition can have outsized impact in certain neighborhoods.Priority should be given to neighborhoods where demolition and removal of buildings is most like to help stabilize neighborhood conditions and property values and create a variety of reuse opportunities. Demolition does not benefit all neighborhoods equally. Demolition is most impactful when it:Stabilizes neighborhood conditionsStabilizes property valuesCreate a variety of attainable reuse opportunities
  • The west side is the historical center of city, so even though all three neighborhoods have seen deteriorating economic conditions and a weakening housing market, the United Way and an umbrella initiative called “Place Matters” is targeting the three different neighborhoods because they includemany of civic, social, cultural and architectural resources of Middletown. Downtown MiddletownDouglas Park NeighborhoodDamon Park Neighborhood http://www.xavier.edu/communitybuilding/placematters/middletown.cfm
  • These goals are comprehensive- they do not just focus on development activities, but instead promote a holistic approach to neighborhood revitalization. Development activities are seen as a means to the ultimate end goals. The projects supported by Place Matters in Middletown are different for each focus neighborhood.DOWNTOWN GOALS1. Market & Promote Downtown's Assets & Events2. Improve the Physical Conditions of Specific Buildings.3. Target Buildings are Occupied with Users.DAMON PARK GOALS1. Improve relationships and form partnerships within the community. 2. Nurture the success of our children. 3. Identify community resources and needs.4. Promote healthy, sustainable living. DOUGLASS PARK GOALS1. Support moms through connections to an early childhood development network.2. Work with young adults to build leadership, character and pride. 3. Create and support a comprehensive communications network.
  • Demolition is more responsive to certain conditions than other. IDEALLY,Community plans have identified priority neighborhood. Again, even if the plan does not identify specific places, it will outline community goals and visions for the future. Places without plans on paper still have ideas, aspirations and visions for their future. Demolition should assist communities in realizing those goals.With that said, communities should not treat demolition asan end unto itself- it is one strategy to be used as a means to achieving the ultimate goal of neighborhood stabilization or revitalization. Demolition should connect to communities’ other revitalization efforts,
  • There is a range of demolition activities that we generally group into 3 categories, although categories are flexible and blurred. Three categories are: selected site, wholesale and dispersed demolition.
  • This approach to demolition can be used in a less coordinated way. Communities can use the money to demolish homes that constitute an immediate safety or health concern, or where an end-user has been identified (i.e. a neighbor that would want a side lot). Dispersed demolition is best for “one-offs” that are located in otherwise strong market neighborhoods or are in rural areas and don’t have immediate day-to-day effects on neighbors. Dispersed demolition is doing “touch up” work.
  • Dispersed site demolition does “touch up work”. By removing the one problem property or handful of properties the community will quickly bounce back.
  • Source:
  • Selective site is best for “tipping point” neighborhoods. These are neighborhoods that still have vitality in them, but are starting to decline with increasing rates of vacancy and abandonment. Selective site demolition helps stabilize the neighborhood and strengthen it by removing negative elements at play. This is often appropriate in inner-ring suburbs that have experiences a decline in revenues, in small to medium sized cities with neighborhoods that have deteriorated but could be saved, and in small towns which have proportionately high numbers of vacancy and abandonment but have other strong assets such as regional hospital, county school, downtown with operating stores.
  • Selective demolition works best when it’s coordinated with other investments.Designating a neighborhood as a targeted neighborhood encourages private investments because investors then know which areas the city has committed resources to.
  • This picture comes from a residential neighborhood near the city square in Mansfield, Ohio.Removing this house would secure a children’s play area that is located in a populated residential neighborhood.
  • Wholesale demolition removes large swaths of problem properties. This option is inappropriate for most communities and really is used only by our most urban areas in very very specific areas.Only counties with landbanks are likely to go this extreme.
  • Even in small hamlets, being strategic about what is demolished can have big rewards.Factors or criteria to consider:Is the building need a community asset or anchor institution?Is the building standing in the way of strengthening the market
  • Here are additional questions or issues we recommend applicants consider as they answer Question 1 on the Attachment. Texture and Conditions:Does the presence of the building contribute meaningfully to the existing neighborhood texture, and would it be compromised by the building’s removal? Is the physical texture of the area strong, or has it been compromised through abandonment and demolition or inappropriate development?What are the set of priorities identified by the county and participating communities?Priorities can be set in official plans, but stakeholders often have priorities that may not be officially established in city or county documents.What are the market and neighborhood conditions? here are some ideas:What is regional and city wide demand?Are there key emerging trends such as houses being rehabilited or speculative building that may affect neighborhood demand.
  • Here are additional questions and issues we suggest applicants consider for question 2:Here are some factors to consider. When possible, quantify the factors. For example, the decline of property values in the last 20 years, will help to explain why the demolition of structures in XX neighborhood will have a significant positive impact on the surrounding properties and neighborhood.Informational data can be found either in the community’s Comprehensive Plan, through the Community Development Department or through the U.S. Census.
  • Even if comprehensive plan doesn’t identify specific neighborhoods to target investment to, unofficially this is likely happening or could be happening. Here are additional questions and issues we suggest applicants consider:- demolition activities would impact and aid selected neighborhoods. Applicants should focus on the destabilizing factors that have greatly affected the neighborhood (decreasing property values, vacancy rates, blight, crime) without disturbing the historical nature, social fabric or texture of the neighborhood. further articulate how demolition can stabilize not only the selected neighborhood, but also surrounding communities as well by assessing the city and regional market and texture.
  • For question 3 on the attachment, applicants must discuss the inclusion of key stakeholders in the decision-making process to ensure the demolition decisions are accounting for a full range of considerations and perspectives.It is important that discussion on demolition criteria not be limited to just village, city and county officials-but instead include a wide range of interests and viewpoints, both within and outside government. The process of making decisions needs to be opened up to those who can evaluate criteria, and who are aware of, and engaged in revitalization activities in the community.
  • For question 3 on the attachment, applicants must discuss the inclusion of key stakeholders in the decision-making process to ensure the demolition decisions are accounting for a full range of considerations and perspectives.Input and feedback can be received through formal or informal processesWe recognize the timeframe for this application is very tight so it may not be possible to include many stakeholders in the intiial process but there is plenty of opportunities to include them in the implementation phase.
  • To help establish a decision process and complete section 2, GOPC suggests applicants consider the following factors in developing criteria for building demolition: Here are additional questions and issues we suggest applicants consider:- demolition activities would impact and aid selected neighborhoods. Applicants should focus on the destabilizing factors that have greatly affected the neighborhood (decreasing property values, vacancy rates, blight, crime) without disturbing the historical nature, social fabric or texture of the neighborhood. further articulate how demolition can stabilize not only the selected neighborhood, but also surrounding communities as well by assessing the city and regional market and texture.
  • For Question 4 of the Application, the Atty General’s office requires applicants to describe the contracting process.
  • For Question 4, the Atty Gen requires:Local governments must identify and document the requirements that local contractors must meet in order to participate in the program.In their application, local governments may want to outline the procedures they use with all contractors.
  • For Question4, we have identified different ways applicants can choose contractors :Applicants have a variety of options when choosing contractors including:Demolition as competitive bidDemolition in-house with city crews and equipmentPut out competitive bid packages for multiple demolitionsFixed Price or retainer contractsNegotiated or sole source contractsDeconstruction contractors
  • In many ways it might be easiest for applicants to start with this section and then work back through the other sections in attachment 3. This may be more the case for urban counties, but rural counties should also consider what will happen to the land after the problem property is removed. The reuse plan helps determine the market to focus on (i.e. Section 2) and which structures within that market (i.e. Section 1)
  • For Question 5 the application requires applicants to describe proposed plans for land reuse options.The Attorney General recommends applicants consider these potential criteria when writing Section 1 of Attachment.The answer should describe the details forSelective demolition And/orWholesale demolitionIn the case of selective demolition, the attorney General asks:what productive post-demolition use is envisioned, such as, greening of the parcel, the parcel is part of a side lot program, residential or commercial development, and urban gardening or agriculture?In the case of selective demolition, the attorney General asks:For larger areas of demolition, what options or plans are envisioned for property, such as assembling under a single public entity, greening, urban agriculture, or expansive redevelopment in the long term?
  • University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business conducted a study that revealed that community-based investments provide significant economic benefits to neighborhoods as well as citywide gains.
  • Local governments can develop a strategy for land post-demolition using established priorities, market and neighborhood conditions and feedback from stakeholders.University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business conducted a study that revealed that community-based investments provide significant economic benefits to neighborhoods as well as citywide gains.
  • For question 5 of the attachment, we want to highlight that different demolition methods produce different land reuse options that local governments can undertake. Wholesale, selective and dispersed demolition are linked to different reuse options, often because of the size of the newly vacant lot.
  • There are many different innovative options for land re-use. This is a greened side lot.  
  • Here are other land re-use options that communities can write about for Question 5.
  • For question 5, larger scale demolition can lead to land-reuse options such as urban agriculture, like the plot in this slide from Youngstown
  • Here are other land re-use options that communities can write about for Question 5.
  • For question 5: another land re-use option possible for any time of demolition is “banking” land for future use. This is a vacant lot that is ready for private investment.Photo: Alison D. Goebel, Greater Ohio staff
  • All seven attachments are due at the time of the application submittal.
  • These two attachments are not required for the application submission.
  • GOPC is holding this workshop on behalf of the Attorney General’s office.GOPC is contracted to provide advice and guidance to communities. We will not complete or submit applications for applicants.

Transcript

  • 1. Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for Demolition Funding GREATER OHIO POLICY CENTER Alison D. Goebel Associate Director Samantha Spergel Research Associate Workshop Piqua, OH June 14, 2012
  • 2. Greater Ohio Policy Center• Mission: Advance public policy and local projects that grow Ohio’s economy and improve the quality of life through intelligent land use.• Support redevelopment of existing communities, strengthen regional cooperation and protect the countryside and Ohios natural resources.• Non-partisan, non-profit, primarily foundation- funded
  • 3. Greater Ohio Policy Center• Conduct and commission research• Use research to advocate for practical policy solutions at the state and federal level• Play an advisory role to state level officials, General Assembly and local officials• Project-based work with local partners
  • 4. Greater Ohio Policy CenterThe Office of Attorney General Mike DeWine hascontracted with GOPC to advise communities ontheir Strategic Plan (Application Attachment 3)and Site Eligibility.GOPC assistance involves:• 2 workshops• Email & Phone consultation• In person, as needed
  • 5. Overview of Presentation• Site Eligibility• Attachment 3 – Building conditions – Market conditions – Stakeholder engagement – Contractor selection – Land Reuse options & plans• Applications basics
  • 6. Site Eligibility: Residential “anti-blight”“Residential” means a structure is:• land zoned for residential use• being used as a residential dwelling• has been used as a residential dwelling• connected to any structure that is currently used or has previously been properly used as a residential dwelling as mixed use.
  • 7. Site EligibilityMoving Ohio Forward Funds cannot beused for:• commercial or industrial projects• maintenance or post-demolition costs• demolition of structure which are not blighted, vacant or abandoned• property acquisition
  • 8. Eligibility: Site AcquisitionAcquisition of blighted residential propertyis anticipated through:• Tax-delinquent foreclosure process• Nuisance abatement• Condemnation• Consent• Other voluntary means of purchase.
  • 9. Eligibility: Site ConsentDemolition Funds can be used on sites thatthe local jurisdiction has consent to workon. Consent can be obtained through:• Memorandums of Understanding between owner and jurisdiction• Other methods approved under federal regulations: – Certified letters sent requiring response within X days and documentation indicating no response
  • 10. Attachment 3Writing Attachment 3
  • 11. Five Sections of Attachment 31. Building conditions2. Failed market conditions3. Stakeholder inclusion4. Contractors selection process5. Proposed land reuse options
  • 12. Attachment 3 Section 1 Of Attachment 3Provide a brief description of the dilapidatedcondition of building(s) selected for demolition.
  • 13. Building Conditions• How does the targeted property/area affect neighboring property values, safety, and revitalization activities• Does the building poses a danger to public health or safety• Likely cost to rehab building substantially outweigh the value• Description of other criteria that will be used to identify structures for demolition
  • 14. Building Conditions Decisions• Besides emergency demolition, demolition decisions will not be clear-cut.• Decisions will involve balancing many different factors.• Establishing a decision process that accounts for a range of factors will help communities make transparent, defensible, impactful decisions.
  • 15. Building Conditions: Decreasing Nearby Property ValuesImpact of vacant properties on neighboringproperty values.• A study done by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland shows that vacant homes can decrease sales prices of nearby homes by 2.2%• If the home has been tax delinquent, foreclosed and vacant, the sales prices of neighboring homes decreases by 17.8%.If nearby values are declining, then that vacanthome could be a good candidate for demolition.
  • 16. Building Conditions: Health Concerns• Is there lead-based paint present?• Is there are other health risks, like mold?• Could someone be injured if they lived or squatted in the structure?• Has the property received multiple code violation notices?If there are health concerns,then that vacant home could bea good candidate fordemolition.
  • 17. Building Conditions: Threat to Public Safety• Is this property used for criminal activity?• Have safety forces been called to this property multiple times?If there are threats to public safety, then that vacanthome could be a good candidate for demolition.
  • 18. Building Conditions: Cost of Rehab• Is the cost to rehab 2+ times the cost to demolish?• Is there any substantial market value in rehabbing the home?If rehabbing costssubstantially outweighdemolition costs, and ifthere is little or no marketfor the rehabbed home, itmight be a good candidatefor demolition. Photo courtesy of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation
  • 19. Building Conditions: Ease of Moving Property Through System• Is the property easy to acquire or get consent to demolish on? – Reminder: demolition funds can not be used to buy property, but community can acquire with other dollars• Is there an end-user who will maintain the property, whether or not they own it? – Eager neighbor – Local nonprofit working in area – Local governmentIf easy to acquire/get consent and there is an identifiedend-user or user who commits to maintain the property,then that problem property might be a good candidatefor demolition.
  • 20. Building Conditions: Collecting information to make decisionsSome analysis of building eligibility for demolition canbe obtained from an exterior survey of the building.Informational data on crime rates, declining propertyvalues, median age of property, etc. can be foundthrough: • jurisdiction’s community development department • jurisdiction’s police department • U.S. Census • FBI Crime Reports
  • 21. Building Conditions: Recap of potential criteria• Impact on nearby property values• Health concerns• Public safety threats• Rehab costs• Ease of moving property through system
  • 22. Attachment 3 Section 2 Of Attachment 3Demonstrate failed market conditions of targetarea and its relation to the rest of thesurrounding community.
  • 23. Failed Market Conditions• Does demolition fit into the local government’s comprehensive plan of redevelopment for the overall community for improving property values, and increasing private investment and redevelopment? If so, how?• Does the housing stock constitute a present or potential nuisance (i.e. breed crime, negatively affect nearby property values)?• Are there additional safety concerns? Is the blighted property near a school?• Does demolition maintain the social fabric and historical nature of the neighborhood?• Percentage of owner-occupied buildings, absentee owner buildings, vacant buildings and vacant lots, if available.
  • 24. Market Conditions: advancing rural and small community goals• Does the community want to maintain its rural character?• Does it want to make area around a community asset like a school or park safer? (community development)• Does it want to improve the appearance and attractiveness of the main thoroughfares into town? (community & economic development)• Does it want to improve or make more attractive the area around a county industrial park? (economic development)If there are structures hindering community priorities,then those properties might be good candidates fordemolition.
  • 25. Market Conditions: Official or Unofficial Plans for suburban and urban areas• Does the jurisdiction have an official comprehensive plan that identifies neighborhoods for stabilization or redevelopment?• Does the jurisdiction have unofficial plans to redevelop an area for future private investment?• Are individual homeowners, nonprofits, or corporations concentrating renovations in certain blocks or in specific neighborhoods?If redevelopment is occurring or is anticipated tooccur, demolition could help ready the area forredevelopment through “spot cleaning.”
  • 26. Market Conditions: Maximizing demolition by coordinating investmentsIdeally, applicants will link demolition to otherrevitalization activities and other resourcesalready being targeted to specific blocks,neighborhoods, areas.
  • 27. Market Conditions: Maximizing demolition by coordinating investments• Targeted Neighborhood Investment is a strategy by which local governments deliberately choose to devote extra resources to specific blocks, neighborhoods, or communities.• The TNI strategy matches neighborhood needs with the right resources to ensure funds are used as effectively as possible.
  • 28. Market Conditions: Demolition does not benefit all neighborhoods equallySeverely distressed neighborhoods face so many challengesthat demolition alone may not be enough to overcome thelegacy of disinvestment. However, demolition can haveoutsized impact in certain neighborhoods.Demolition is most impactful when it:• Stabilizes neighborhood conditions• Stabilizes property values• Create a variety of attainable reuse opportunities
  • 29. Market Conditions: Targeting resources to specific neighborhoodsIn Middletown,three west sideneighborhoods arereceiving targetedand coordinatedinvestments fromthe public, private,and nonprofitsectors. Photo courtesy of http://www.xavier.edu/communitybuilding/placematters/middletown.cfm
  • 30. Market Conditions: Targeting resources to specific neighborhoodsIn each neighborhood, United Way, PlaceMatters, the city of Middletown, and residentshave identified priorities for each neighborhood.These priorities differ between areas but allwork together to strengthen the urban fabric ofMiddletown.
  • 31. Market Conditions: Demolition is a step in the process toward neighborhood revitalization.• Demolition is not an end to itself- it is one strategy to stabilizing or revitalizing neighborhoods.• Connecting demolition activities to other revitalization efforts underway ensures demolition is part of a larger redevelopment strategy.• Linking demolition to redevelopment ensures a larger Return On Investment.
  • 32. Market Conditions: Fitting Demolition to Community Needs There is no one way to approach demolition; there is a continuum of ways to execute it. Dispersed Selective Site WholesaleRemoving Deliberate decisions Deliberate decision toproperties that to remove specific “wipe slate clean” and problem properties. start over fresh on aare isolated Properties that stand specific block(s) byproblems. They in the way of removing majority ofhave minimal redevelopment or existing structures.impact on the contribute to Wholesale is thesurrounding area. neighborhood option of last resort. blighting are top candidates.
  • 33. Market Conditions: Dispersed Demolition to advance community planDispersed demolition removes isolated problemproperties before they start to negatively impactthe surrounding area.
  • 34. Market Conditions: Dispersed Demolition to advance community planIn rural areas that do not have widespreadvacancies, dispersed demolition can be appropriatefor:• Mitigating health/safety hazards, particularly in small villages• Strengthening the “look” or “feel” of community• Harmonizing land use; for example removing an abandoned house near a county industrial park to address aesthetic and safety issues
  • 35. Market Conditions: Dispersed Demolition to advance community planIn suburban andurban areas,disperseddemolition can beappropriate forsingle problemproperties inotherwise strongmarketneighborhoods. Photo courtesy of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation
  • 36. Market Conditions: Selective Demolition to advance community planSelective demolition acts as extra reinforcement tokeep a neighborhood from further degrading.Selective demolition is often appropriate inneighborhoods that still have vitality and marketdemand.Often these neighborhoods are called “tippingpoint” neighborhoods.
  • 37. Market Conditions: Selective Demolition to advance community planLeveraging the value of selective demolition• A strong social fabric, reflected in strong neighborhood or civic associations or neighborhood-level institutions• Active CDC-led stabilization or revitalization activities• Great market potential, such as distinctive housing stock, or location to a strong anchor intuition• A significant planned public investment, such as a new school
  • 38. Market Conditions: Selective Demolition to advance community plan
  • 39. Market Conditions: Wholesale Demolition to advance community planWholesale demolition is only appropriate in veryselect conditions.Wholesale demolition would be used to create a“clean slate” in a neighborhood that is almostcompletely disinvested.Wholesale demolition is an explicit and deliberatepart of a larger comprehensive strategy forimproving a city or region.
  • 40. Market Conditions: Other criteria to assess how property affect neighborhood fabric and its marketability• Is the building near a school/library/public park?• Is the building inhibiting new construction?• Has the neighborhood begun to see other revitalization activities?
  • 41. Market Conditions: Other criteria to assess how property affect neighborhood fabric and its marketability• Does the presence of the building add to the existing block or neighborhood texture?• Would removing a building compromise the neighborhood’s “feel”?Buildings that “won’t be missed” in a block orneighborhood might be good candidates for demolition.
  • 42. Market Conditions: Quantify Conditions• Quantifying conditions can help justify demolition choices. – % of owner occupied homes – % absentee owners – % vacant lots• Informational data can be found through: • United States Postal Service • jurisdiction’s community development department • jurisdiction’s police department • U.S. Census
  • 43. Market Conditions: Recap of Criteria – What is the community plan and how does demolition advance that plan? – Nuisance & safety concerns – Social fabric and historical nature of area – Neighborhood statistics
  • 44. Attachment 3 Section 3 Of Attachment 3Discuss the inclusion of key stakeholders in thedecision-making process to ensure demolitiondecisions account for a range of perspectives.
  • 45. Stakeholder Inclusion: input from a range of stakeholdersDiscussions on demolition criteria shouldinclude a wide range of interests andviewpoints, both within and outsidegovernment.
  • 46. Stakeholder Inclusion: gathering feedbackIdentify how stakeholder feedback issolicited: • Interviews • Public meetings • Surveys
  • 47. Stakeholder Inclusion: specific stakeholders• Identify specific partners and stakeholders: • Nonprofits • Public entities • Community groups • Institutions, like colleges
  • 48. List of Potential Stakeholders:Potential stakeholders include:• City planning, community development and building departments• City or county historical preservation agency• Economic Development department• Law Department• Police Department• Fire Department• Local Schools• Other city/county departments• CDCs• Other neighborhood or community organizations• Other non-governmental organizations such as Foundations, Chamber of Commerce, Businesses
  • 49. Stakeholder Inclusion: Recap of Criteria • Who is giving input? • How is input collected?
  • 50. Attachment 3 Section 4 Of Attachment 3Describe the process for selecting contractorsfor demolition.Provide a timeline to prove capacity andability to spend funding in a timely manner.
  • 51. Selecting ContractorsThe application should explain:• The process for selecting contractors for demolition• Provide a brief time-line to prove capacity and ability to spend funding in a timely manner.
  • 52. Selecting Contractors: Requirements for Contractors• Liability Insurance• Workers Compensation• Checking the Federal and State debarment list• Documenting policy and procedures for barring poor performing contractors from continuing to participate in the program• Having policies regarding a Drug Free Workplace and EEO• Knowledgeable of and understand Ohio Ethics and Conflict of Interest of Laws.
  • 53. Selecting Contractors: Choosing ContractorsThere is no one specified process for selectingcontractors. Applicants have a variety of options whenchoosing contractors including: • Demolition as competitive bid • Demolition in-house with city crews and equipment • Put out competitive bid packages for multiple demolitions • Fixed Price or retainer contracts • Negotiated or sole source contracts • Deconstruction contractors
  • 54. Selecting Contractors: Project TimelineTimeline should include milestones to help progressMilestones to consider:• When will stakeholder input be solicited• When will contractor bids go out• When will demolition begin• When will demolition concludeThe timeline should demonstrate capacity to disperseand use funds within program time frame.
  • 55. Contractor Selection: Recap of Criteria • How are contractors chosen? • What is the timeline for the project?
  • 56. Attachment 3 Section 5 Of Attachment 3Describe proposed plans for land reuse optionssubsequent to demolition.
  • 57. Land Reuse Options• For selective demolition, what productive post-demolition use is envisioned?• For larger areas of demolition, what options or plans are envisioned for property?
  • 58. Land Re-use Options: why is it important?Selective and wholesale demolition leads to thecreation of vacant land.Proximity to a neglected vacant lot subtracts 20percent from the base value from a nearby homeA home near a stabilized lot—one that has beenimproved through cleaning and greening—increases by approximately 15% the home’s basevalue
  • 59. Land Re-use Options: why is it important?Improving commercial corridors,streetscapes, parks, and cleaning vacantlots at the same time, have the potentialfor the greatest impact on strugglingneighborhoods.
  • 60. Land Re-use Options: different uses for different types of demolitionDifferent demolition methods producedifferent land reuse options.
  • 61. Land Re-use Options: Selective Demolition re-use possibilities Removed house to create green side lot on Brentwood St, YoungstownPhotos courtesy of YoungstownNeighborhood Development Corporation
  • 62. Land Re-use Options: Selected Demolition re-use possibilities• Other options for selected site demolition include: – Side Lots – Mini-Parks – Park Expansion – Stabilization/minimal treatment – Pathways – Off-street parking
  • 63. Land Re-use Options: Wholesale Demolition re-use possibilities Removed abandoned six-plex and replaced with an urban agriculture site. YoungstownPhoto courtesy of YoungstownNeighborhood Development Corporation
  • 64. Land Re-use Options: Wholesale Demolition re-use possibilities• For larger scale demolition some land-reuse options include: – Community gardens – Community orchards – Urban agriculture – Daylighting streams, waterways and floodplains – Greening – Expansive Redevelopment
  • 65. Land Re-use Options: Wholesale Demolition re-use possibilities Demolition can prepare a lot for potential reuse in the future
  • 66. Land Re-Use: Recap of Criteria• What happens to land after problem property is cleared?• Describe plans for areas that will receive selective demolition.• Describe plans for larger scale reuses.
  • 67. Attachment 3Attachment 3 Basics
  • 68. Important Due Dates to Moving Ohio Forward Grant ProgramApplication Submission Deadline: June 30, 2012-5:00pmGrant Award Date: August 1, 2012Project Completion Date: December 31, 2013Final Drawdown Date: January 31, 2014Final Performance Report Due Date: December 31, 2014
  • 69. Moving Ohio Forward Application Basics• Review Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program Demolition Guidelines before completing application.• Applications must include all attachments and supporting documentation.• Pages of the application without fill-in fields shall be typed using font size no smaller than 12 point.• All pages should be numbered indicating the section, attachment number and page number.
  • 70. Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 1-Application Summary Document• Attachment 2-Authorizing Resolution or Ordinance• Attachment 3-Strategic Plan• Attachment 4-Sources and Uses of Funds (complete the fillable portion of the application)• Attachment 5-Match Supporting Documentation• Attachment 6-Remedial Action Plan• Attachment 7-Project Assumptions/Cost Estimate
  • 71. Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 8- Reimbursement Request Report is a cover page required to be submitted with each payment request.• Attachment 9-Final Performance Report is required to be submitted after the conclusion of the grant program and no later than December 31, 2014.
  • 72. Example of Attachment 3Example Attachment 3Available at GOPC’s website:www.greaterohio.org.
  • 73. Greater Ohio Policy CenterGreater Ohio Policy Center is available to adviseapplicants through:• Email• Phone• In person, as needed For our assistance, please contact: Samantha Spergel, Research Associate sspergel@greaterohio.org 614-224-1087
  • 74. Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for Demolition Funding QUESTIONS? Visit our website: http://greaterohio.org/ Read our Greater Ohio blog: http://greaterohio.org/blog Follow us on Twitter: @GreaterOhio Like Greater Ohio Policy Center on Facebook