Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for        Demolition Funding                          GREATER OHIO POLICY              ...
Greater Ohio Policy Center• Mission: Advance public policy and local projects  that grow Ohio’s economy and improve the  q...
Greater Ohio Policy Center• Conduct and commission research• Use research to advocate for practical policy  solutions at t...
Overview of Moving Ohio Forward Grant ProgramThe Ohio Attorney General has allocated a totalof $75 Million to all 88 count...
Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 1-Application Summary Document• Attachment 2-Authorizing Resolution o...
Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 8- Reimbursement Request  Report is a cover page required to be  subm...
Greater Ohio Policy CenterThe Office of Attorney General Mike DeWine hascontracted with GOPC to advise communities ontheir...
Important Due Dates to Moving Ohio         Forward Grant ProgramApplication Submission Deadline:     June 30, 2012-5:00pmG...
Overview of Presentation• Site Eligibility• Strategic Demolition  – Defining strategic demolition – five guiding principle...
Site Eligibility: Residential “anti-blight”“Residential” means a structure is:• land zoned for residential use• being used...
Site EligibilityMoving Ohio Forward Funds cannot beused for:• commercial or industrial projects• maintenance or post-demol...
Eligibility: Site AcquisitionAcquisition of blighted residential propertyis anticipated through:• Tax-delinquent foreclosu...
Strategic Demolition –          Five Guiding Principles        Strategic Demolition maximizes         strategic impact of ...
Defining Strategic Demolition:           Five Guiding Principles1. Demolition is a step in the process toward   neighborho...
1. Demolition is a step in the process   toward neighborhood revitalization.• Demolition is not an end to itself- it is on...
2. Demolition plans should establish             rational criteria.• Local governments should develop priorities  to guide...
3. Applicants should get input from a range              of stakeholders.Discussions on demolition criteria shouldinclude ...
4. Demolition does not benefit all          neighborhoods equallySeverely distressed neighborhoods face so many challenges...
5. Reuses of LandDemolition will lead to vacant land.• Good planning, solid community strategy, and clear-eyed  understand...
Value of Strategic Demolition• A study done by the Federal Reserve Bank of  Cleveland shows that vacant homes can  decreas...
Value of Strategic Demolition• By demolishing a vacant home, the median  sales price of a neighboring home increases by  $...
Determining a Strategic PlanPriority should be given to areas where removalof individuals buildings is likely to help stab...
Determining a Strategic PlanStrategic demolition goals are demonstrated byaddressing:  – A description of the blight and a...
Strategic Approaches:               Menu of Options• Wholesale demolition in a target area is part  of a larger comprehens...
Wholesale DemolitionWholesale demolition is only appropriate in veryselect conditions.Wholesale demolition would be used t...
Wholesale DemolitionPhoto from a block in Detroit where 60 of 66 housesare abandoned or vacant.Photo courtesy of: http://w...
Selective DemolitionSelective demolition acts as extra reinforcement to keepa neighborhood from further degrading. In prac...
Leveraging the value of selective demolition• A strong social fabric, reflected in strong  neighborhood or civic associati...
Selective Demolition
Dispersed DemolitionDispersed demolition removes isolated problemproperties before they start to negatively impactthe surr...
Dispersed DemolitionIn suburban andurban areas,disperseddemolition can beappropriate forsingle problemproperties inotherwi...
Dispersed DemolitionIn rural areas that do not have widespreadvacancies, dispersed demolition can beappropriate for:• Miti...
Targeted AreasStrategic demolition maximizes benefits forcommunities.Identifying targeted areas (assumed inAttachment 3 ) ...
Identifying “Target Areas”Prior to answering the five questions outlined inthe Moving Ohio Forward Application, localgover...
Using Targeted Neighborhood Investment    to Identify Target Areas in Cities• Targeted Neighborhood Investment is a  strat...
Youngstown TNI Example• Youngstown Neighborhood Development  Corporation (YNDC) has focused its resources  and energies on...
Youngstown TNI ExamplePublic, private, and nonprofit investments aretargeted to Crandall Park North, Lincoln Park,and Idor...
Attachment 3Writing Attachment 3
Five Sections of Attachment 31. Building Conditions:  – Provide a brief description of the dilapidated    condition of bui...
Attachment 3    Section 1Of Attachment 3
Building Conditions– How does the targeted property/area affect  neighboring property values, safety, and  revitalization ...
Building Conditions:How targeted property affects neighboring property values,           safety and revitalization activit...
Building Conditions: Danger to public             health or safety• Has crime in the  neighborhood  increased?• Does the b...
Building Conditions: Cost of Rehab• Would the cost  to rehab to 2X  the cost to  demolish?• Is there any  substantial  mar...
Building Conditions: Other criteria• Does the presence of the  building add to the  existing neighborhood  texture? Would ...
Building Conditions: Collecting information• Much of this information has already  been identified in a communitys  Compre...
Building Conditions Decisions• Setting neighborhoods priorities will help determine  demolition choices.• Besides emergenc...
Attachment 3    Section 2Of Attachment 3
Failed Market Conditions– Does the housing stock constitute a present or potential  nuisance (i.e. breed crime, negatively...
Failed Market Conditions:     Local Governments look for– valuable impact on selected neighborhoods.– stabilization impact...
Failed Market Conditions: Information                Collection• Quantifying conditions can help justify demolition  choic...
Attachment 3    Section 3Of Attachment 3
Stakeholder Inclusion• Identify specific partners and stakeholders:  •   Nonprofits  •   Public entities  •   Community gr...
Attachment 3    Section 4Of Attachment 3
Selecting ContractorsThe application should explain:• The process for selecting contractors for  demolition• Provide a bri...
Selecting ContractorsAttorney General requires contractors to have:    – Liability Insurance    – Workers Compensation    ...
Selecting ContractorsThere is no one specified process for selectingcontractors. Applicants have a variety of options when...
Attachment 3    Section 5Of Attachment 3
Land Reuse OptionsFor Question 5 the application requiresapplicants to describe proposed plans for landreuse options.The a...
Land Reuse Options: StrategySelective and wholesale demolition leadsto the creation of vacant land.• Using established pri...
Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Improving commercial corridors,streetscapes, parks, and cleaning vacantlots at the s...
Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Home values can increase more than 25%when they are near improvements tostreetscapes...
Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Proximity to a neglected vacant lotsubtracts 20 percent from the base valuefrom a ne...
Land Re-Use StrategyDifferent demolition methods producedifferent land reuse options that localgovernments can undertake.
Selected Demolition example of Land Reuse                                       Removed house                             ...
Other Selected Demolition• Other options for selected site demolition  include:   – Side Lots   – Mini-Parks   – Park Expa...
Wholesale Demolition example                       of Land Reuse                                       Removed abandoned  ...
Other Selected Demolition• For larger scale demolition some land-reuse options  include:   –   Community gardens   –   Com...
Other examples of Land Reuse                     Demolition                     can prepare                     a lot for ...
Attachment 3Attachment 3 Basics
Moving Ohio Forward Application Basics• Review Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program  Demolition Guidelines before completing ...
Example of Attachment 3Example Attachment 3Available at GOPC’s website:www.greaterohio.org.
Greater Ohio Policy CenterGreater Ohio Policy Center is available to adviseapplicants through:• Email• Phone• In person, a...
Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for Demolition                    Funding             QUESTIONS?                  Visit ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Moving ohio forward grant program for demolition funding

2,388 views
2,172 views

Published on

Greater Ohio consulted with the Ohio Attorney General's office to conduct workshops to provide assistance/guidance to Ohio cities receiving demolition funding.

Published in: Business, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,388
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Image courtesy of Millie Davis, Greater Ohio 2009 staffer
  • - The Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program is a unique funding stream, solely dedicated to the demolishment of residential structure. - that detract from existing home values and create a toxic breeding ground for crime.Dedicated funding toward demolition activities is rare- and thus this program may be a “one-shot” opportunity for communities to address blighted properties through demolition.
  • All seven attachments are due at the time of the application submittal.
  • These two attachments are not required for the application submission.
  • The Office of Attorney General Mike DeWine has contracted with GOPC to advise communities on their Strategic Plan (Application Attachment 3) and Site Eligibility, as they develop, finalize, and submit their Application under the AG’s Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program. GOPC is holding this workshop on behalf of the Attorney General’s office.GOPC is contracted to provide advice and guidance to communities. We will not complete or submit applications for applicants.
  • Demolition is not an end to itself- it is one strategy to be used as a means to achieving the ultimate goal of neighborhood stabilization or revitalization. To the greatest extent possible, demolition activities should connect to communities’ other revitalization efforts, and Comprehensive Plans to ensure demolition is part of a larger redevelopment strategy.By linking demolition to redevelopment, this helps ensure a larger Return On Investment- in both financial and social contexts.
  • 2. Criteria will not only legitimize decisions made by the local governments and their partners, but also will maximize the value of demolition and provide the greatest impact on communities.
  • 3. It is important that discussion on demolition criteria not be limited to just village, city and county officials-but instead include a wide range of interests and viewpoints, both within and outside government. The process of making decisions needs to be opened up to those who can evaluate criteria, and who are aware of, and engaged in revitalization activities in the community.
  • Priority should be given to neighborhoods where demolition and removal of buildings is most like to help stabilize neighborhood conditions and property values and create a variety of reuse opportunities. Severely distressed neighborhoods face so many challenges that demolition may not be enough to overcome the legacy of disinvestment. However, demolition can have outsized impact in certain neighborhoods.Demolition does not benefit all neighborhoods equally. Demolition is most impactful when it:Stabilizes neighborhood conditionsStabilizes property valuesCreate a variety of attainable reuse opportunities
  • Local governments must be cognizant of their strategy and capacity in ensuring that any vacant land created is being used productively, and does not become a problem in itself. Local governments may want to prioritize demolition to be used for land that has specific re-use potential. Additionally, while some land can be repurposed to another developmental use, some parcels may remain vacant. Local governments and their partners should try to establish protocol for maintaining vacant land.
  • Knowing the impact of property values on vacant blighted homes, communities are greatly served by understanding their market conditions and targeting demolition in ways that maximizes resources.
  • The applicant's demolition strategy should complement current redevelopment efforts and future goals that have already been identified through these plans.
  • It is encouraged that applying entities write Attachment 3 based upon their own Strategic, Comprehensive Plans and/or Community Housing Improvement Strategy.
  • Detroit, Cleveland and Youngstown are undertaking extremely targeted wholesale demolition in their hardest hit neighborhoods. Even in one of the most disinvested neighborhoods of Cincinnati—Over-the-Rhine– little demolition has occurred because the architectural fabric is so significant and is a major asset in OTR’s revitalization.photo from photo project by Jim Griffeon: http://www.sweet-juniper.com/2009/04/singularity.html
  • Selective demolition works best when it’s coordinated withStrong social fabricActive nonprofit involvementExisting market potentialAnd/orPlanned public investment
  • This picture comes from a residential neighborhood near the city square in Mansfield, Ohio.Removing this house would secure a children’s play area that is located in a populated residential neighborhood.
  • This approach to demolition can be used in a less coordinated way. Communities can use the money to demolish homes that constitute an immediate safety or health concern, or where an end-user has been identified (i.e. a neighbor that would want a side lot).
  • Source:
  • Photos??
  • Strategic demolition (meaning: wholesale, selected or dispersed) maximizes benefits for communities. Identifying targeted areas (assumed in Attachment 3 ) maximizes the ability to be strategic
  • Prior to answering the five questions outlined in the Moving Ohio Forward Application, local governments need to identify the specific “areas” or neighborhoods they are targeting. This will assist in answering several components to Attachment 3: Section 1: framing decisions concerning criteria for building conditions, Section 2: describing the failed market conditions,and Section 5: illustrating the land reuse options.
  • Targeted Neighborhood Investment is a strategy by which local governments choose to devote extra resources to specific communities. By targeting investments, a Targeted Neighborhood investment strategy may have a larger impact on a community with respect to resident confidence and future tax revenues than wholesale demolition. The TNI strategy matches neighborhoods needs with the right resources to ensure funds are used as effectively as possible.Broadly, we define neighborhoods into three different types to help determine where to target neighborhood investments:Strong neighborhoods are those that have low vacancy and abandonment rates and strong housing markets. Tipping point neighborhoods are locales are those that are beginning to experience an increase in vacancy rates, some blighted homes, and a weakening housing market. However, the neighborhood still enjoys some vitality- through strong neighborhood groups and associations, and land-reuse potential. Severely challenged neighborhoods are those that have experienced severe disinvestment- they may have over a 50% vacancy rate, and a drastic drop in median home values.In many cases, a community’s demolition priorities should not be in heavily abandoned and disinvested areas, but in areas where removal of buildings are likely to help stabile neighborhood conditions and property values and create potential reuse opportunities.
  • The Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation, a Youngstown-based non-profit specifically chose to focus on three neighborhoods: Crandall Park North, Lincoln Park and Idora. All three neighborhoods are “tipping point neighborhoods”.
  • The Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation, a Youngstown-based non-profit specifically chose to focus on neighborhoods that had assets and vitality that could be strengthened and built upon—revitalization in these neighborhoods did not “start from scratch”The neighborhoods that Youngstown is directing significant investments into have assets like:Existing community networks and block groups among neighbors that could be strengthen relatively easilyMajority owner-occupied homes, despite lower rates of occupancyAccess to community amenities like Mill Creek Park (one of the largest metro parks in the nation) and Stambaugh Golf CourseArchitecturally unique and attractive residences
  • Now that we’ve explained the “behind the scenes” thinking that will help you decide what areas to focus demolition onto,We will now walk through Attachment 3 to show where these pieces fit in the different Attachment Components
  • The purpose of Attachment 3 is to specifically identify procedures and processes the applicant will undergo to 1). Choose which buildings to demolish; 2). Establish how demolition activities will impact neighborhoods; 3). Engage various stakeholders; 4). Ensure contractors are selected fairly; and 5). Indicate how vacant land will be utilized. Through answering these five questions, applications should further demonstrate their capacity to use funding in a timely manner and stress the importance of collaboration with other sub-recipients.
  • These are the questions the Attorney General raises for Question 1 of Attachment.
  • Here are additional questions or issues we recommend applicants consider as they answer Question 1 on the Attachment.
  • Here are additional questions or issues we recommend applicants consider as they answer Question 1 on the Attachment.
  • Here are additional questions or issues we recommend applicants consider as they answer Question 1 on the Attachment.
  • Here are additional questions or issues we recommend applicants consider as they answer Question 1 on the Attachment. Texture and Conditions:Does the presence of the building contribute meaningfully to the existing neighborhood texture, and would it be compromised by the building’s removal? Is the physical texture of the area strong, or has it been compromised through abandonment and demolition or inappropriate development?What are the set of priorities identified by the county and participating communities?Priorities can be set in official plans, but stakeholders often have priorities that may not be officially established in city or county documents.What are the market and neighborhood conditions? here are some ideas:What is regional and city wide demand?Are there key emerging trends such as houses being rehabilited or speculative building that may affect neighborhood demand.
  • Here are additional questions or issues to consider as you answer Question 1 on the Attachment. Building conditions:Much of this information has already been identified in a community's Comprehensive Plan or through the work of the Community Development Department.Some analysis can be obtained from a simple exterior survey of the building and its surroundings.
  • Here are additional questions or issues to consider as you answer Question 1 on the Attachment. Setting neighborhoods priorities will help determine demolition choices.The choice of which buildings to demolish, other than emergency demolitions, should be made through a decision process that enables the applicants and engaged stakeholders to weigh their various factors for or against demolition of any specific building. Demolition decisions will not be clear-cut. Decisions will involve balancing many different factors.
  • For Questions 2 in the Attachment, the Attorney General requests applicants: Demonstrate failed market conditions of target area and its relation to the rest of the surrounding community with the follow criteria as a guide.Here are the criteria the Atty General wants applicants to consider:Does the housing stock constitute a present or potential nuisance (i.e. breed crime, negatively affect nearby property values)?Are there additional safety concerns? Is the blighted property near a school?Does demolition maintain the social fabric and historical nature of the neighborhood?Percentage of owner-occupied buildings, absentee owner buildings, vacant buildings and vacant lots, if available.Does demolition fit into the local government’s comprehensive plan of redevelopment for the overall community for improving property values, and increasing private investment and redevelopment? If so, how
  • Here are additional questions and issues we suggest applicants consider:- demolition activities would impact and aid selected neighborhoods. Applicants should focus on the destabilizing factors that have greatly affected the neighborhood (decreasing property values, vacancy rates, blight, crime) without disturbing the historical nature, social fabric or texture of the neighborhood. further articulate how demolition can stabilize not only the selected neighborhood, but also surrounding communities as well by assessing the city and regional market and texture.
  • Here are additional questions and issues we suggest applicants consider for question 2:Here are some factors to consider. When possible, quantify the factors. For example, the decline of property values in the last 20 years, will help to explain why the demolition of structures in XX neighborhood will have a significant positive impact on the surrounding properties and neighborhood.Informational data can be found either in the community’s Comprehensive Plan, through the Community Development Department or through the U.S. Census.
  • For question 3 on the attachment, applicants must discuss the inclusion of key stakeholders in the decision-making process to ensure the demolition decisions are accounting for a full range of considerations and perspectives.Discussions on demolition criteria should include a wide range of interests and viewpoints, both within and outside of government. Input and feedback can be received through formal or informal processesThe process of making decisions needs to be opened up to those who can evaluate criteria, and who are aware of, and engaged in revitalization activities in the community. Applicants might consider creating a standing committee on demolition or a less formal working group that meets regularly to review proposed demolition.Potential stakeholders include: City planning, community development and building departmentsCity or county historical preservation agencyEconomic Development departmentLaw DepartmentPolice DepartmentFire DepartmentLocal SchoolsOther city/county departmentsCDCsOther neighborhood or community organizationsOther non-governmental organizations such as Foundations, Chamber of Commerce, Businesses Applications might describe how key stakeholders will help identify and implement strategic demolition goals  
  • For Question 4 of the Application, the Atty General’s office requires applicants to describe the contracting process.
  • For Question 4, the Atty Gen requires:Local governments must identify and document the requirements that local contractors must meet in order to participate in the program.In their application, local governments may want to outline the procedures they use with all contractors.
  • For Question4, we have identified different ways applicants can choose contractors :Applicants have a variety of options when choosing contractors including:Demolition as competitive bidDemolition in-house with city crews and equipmentPut out competitive bid packages for multiple demolitionsFixed Price or retainer contractsNegotiated or sole source contractsDeconstruction contractors
  • For Question 5 the application requires applicants to describe proposed plans for land reuse options.The answer should describe the details forSelective demolition And/orWholesale demolitionIn the case of selective demolition, the attorney General asks:what productive post-demolition use is envisioned, such as, greening of the parcel, the parcel is part of a side lot program, residential or commercial development, and urban gardening or agriculture?In the case of selective demolition, the attorney General asks:For larger areas of demolition, what options or plans are envisioned for property, such as assembling under a single public entity, greening, urban agriculture, or expansive redevelopment in the long term?
  • As we described at the beginning of our presentation in the 5 guiding principles, there should be a strategy for land post-demolition.The strategy should be connected to the demolition criteria and process.
  • University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business conducted a study that revealed that community-based investments provide significant economic benefits to neighborhoods as well as citywide gains.
  • Wharton School Study
  • University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business conducted a study that revealed that community-based investments provide significant economic benefits to neighborhoods as well as citywide gains.
  • For question 5 of the attachment, we want to highlight that different demolition methods produce different land reuse options that local governments can undertake. Wholesale, selective and dispersed demolition are linked to different reuse options, often because of the size of the newly vacant lot.
  • There are many different innovative options for land re-use. This is a greened side lot.  
  • Here are other land re-use options that communities can write about for Question 5.
  • For question 5, larger scale demolition can lead to land-reuse options such as urban agriculture, like the plot in this slide from Youngstown
  • Here are other land re-use options that communities can write about for Question 5.
  • For question 5: another land re-use option possible for any time of demolition is “banking” land for future use. This is a vacant lot that is ready for private investment.Photo: Alison D. Goebel, Greater Ohio staff
  • GOPC is holding this workshop on behalf of the Attorney General’s office.GOPC is contracted to provide advice and guidance to communities. We will not complete or submit applications for applicants.
  • Moving ohio forward grant program for demolition funding

    1. 1. Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for Demolition Funding GREATER OHIO POLICY CENTER STAFF Lavea Brachman Executive Director Alison D. Goebel Associate Director Samantha Spergel Research Associate Workshop Columbus, OH June 8, 2012
    2. 2. Greater Ohio Policy Center• Mission: Advance public policy and local projects that grow Ohio’s economy and improve the quality of life through intelligent land use.• Support redevelopment of existing communities, strengthen regional cooperation and protect the countryside and Ohios natural resources.• Non-partisan, non-profit, primarily foundation- funded
    3. 3. Greater Ohio Policy Center• Conduct and commission research• Use research to advocate for practical policy solutions at the state and federal level• Play an advisory role to state level officials, General Assembly and local officials• Project-based work with local partners
    4. 4. Overview of Moving Ohio Forward Grant ProgramThe Ohio Attorney General has allocated a totalof $75 Million to all 88 counties in Ohio todemolish vacant, abandoned and blightedproperties
    5. 5. Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 1-Application Summary Document• Attachment 2-Authorizing Resolution or Ordinance• Attachment 3-Strategic Plan• Attachment 4-Sources and Uses of Funds (complete the fillable portion of the application)• Attachment 5-Match Supporting Documentation• Attachment 6-Remedial Action Plan• Attachment 7-Project Assumptions/Cost Estimate
    6. 6. Moving Ohio Forward Required Attachments• Attachment 8- Reimbursement Request Report is a cover page required to be submitted with each payment request.• Attachment 9-Final Performance Report is required to be submitted after the conclusion of the grant program and no later than December 31, 2014.
    7. 7. Greater Ohio Policy CenterThe Office of Attorney General Mike DeWine hascontracted with GOPC to advise communities ontheir Strategic Plan (Application Attachment 3)and Site Eligibility.GOPC assistance involves:• 2 workshops• Email & Phone consultation• In person, as needed
    8. 8. Important Due Dates to Moving Ohio Forward Grant ProgramApplication Submission Deadline: June 30, 2012-5:00pmGrant Award Date: August 1, 2012Project Completion Date: December 31, 2013Final Drawdown Date: January 31, 2014Final Performance Report Due Date: December 31, 2014
    9. 9. Overview of Presentation• Site Eligibility• Strategic Demolition – Defining strategic demolition – five guiding principles – Targeted Areas• Completing Attachment 3 – Conditions of Buildings – Failed Market Conditions – Engaging Stakeholders – Selecting Contractors – Land Reuse Options
    10. 10. Site Eligibility: Residential “anti-blight”“Residential” means a structure is:• land zoned for residential use• being used as a residential dwelling• has been used as a residential dwelling• connected to any structure that is currently used or has previously been properly used as a residential dwelling as mixed use.
    11. 11. Site EligibilityMoving Ohio Forward Funds cannot beused for:• commercial or industrial projects• maintenance or post-demolition costs• demolition of structure which are not blighted, vacant or abandoned• property acquisition
    12. 12. Eligibility: Site AcquisitionAcquisition of blighted residential propertyis anticipated through:• Tax-delinquent foreclosure process• Nuisance abatement• Condemnation• Consent• Other voluntary means of purchase.
    13. 13. Strategic Demolition – Five Guiding Principles Strategic Demolition maximizes strategic impact of demolition and help applicants maximize impact of programfunding to improve neighborhoods and property values
    14. 14. Defining Strategic Demolition: Five Guiding Principles1. Demolition is a step in the process toward neighborhood revitalization.2. Any community-wide demolition plan should establish rational criteria for selecting neighborhoods to target buildings to demolish and retain.3. Applicants should get input from a range of stakeholders.4. Demolition does not benefit all neighborhoods equally.5. A well-thought out post-demolition reuse plan can prevent newly vacant land from becoming a problem.
    15. 15. 1. Demolition is a step in the process toward neighborhood revitalization.• Demolition is not an end to itself- it is one strategy to stabilizing or revitalizing neighborhoods.• Connecting demolition activities to other revitalization efforts underway ensures demolition is part of a larger redevelopment strategy.• Linking demolition to redevelopment ensures a larger Return On Investment.
    16. 16. 2. Demolition plans should establish rational criteria.• Local governments should develop priorities to guide their demolition activities.• Resources should be coordinated and as comprehensive as possible, and dedicated to stabilizing neighborhoods that are undergoing challenges.
    17. 17. 3. Applicants should get input from a range of stakeholders.Discussions on demolition criteria shouldinclude a wide range of interests andviewpoints, both within and outsidegovernment.
    18. 18. 4. Demolition does not benefit all neighborhoods equallySeverely distressed neighborhoods face so many challengesthat demolition may not be enough to overcome the legacyof disinvestment. However, demolition can have outsizedimpact in certain neighborhoods.Demolition is most impactful when it:• Stabilizes neighborhood conditions• Stabilizes property values• Create a variety of attainable reuse opportunities
    19. 19. 5. Reuses of LandDemolition will lead to vacant land.• Good planning, solid community strategy, and clear-eyed understanding of local capacity can ensure that newly created vacant land is used productively, and does not become a problem.• Local governments may want to prioritize demolition to be used for land that has specific re-use potential.• Some parcels may remain vacant.• Local governments and their partners should try to establish protocol for maintaining vacant land.
    20. 20. Value of Strategic Demolition• A study done by the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland shows that vacant homes can decrease sales prices of nearby homes by 2.2%• If the home has been tax delinquent, foreclosed and vacant, the sales prices of neighboring homes decreases by 17.8%.
    21. 21. Value of Strategic Demolition• By demolishing a vacant home, the median sales price of a neighboring home increases by $1,340.• If the home had been tax delinquent, foreclosed and vacant prior to demolishment the median sales price increased by $15,000.
    22. 22. Determining a Strategic PlanPriority should be given to areas where removalof individuals buildings is likely to help stabilizeneighborhood conditions and property valuesand create potential reuse opportunities.
    23. 23. Determining a Strategic PlanStrategic demolition goals are demonstrated byaddressing: – A description of the blight and abandonment conditions – The target area benefits from the demolition – The demolition is linked to potential property reuse and area-wide revitalization.
    24. 24. Strategic Approaches: Menu of Options• Wholesale demolition in a target area is part of a larger comprehensive strategy that will positively benefit the neighborhood and surroundings areas.• Selected demolition• Dispersed demolition
    25. 25. Wholesale DemolitionWholesale demolition is only appropriate in veryselect conditions.Wholesale demolition would be used to create a“clean slate” in a neighborhood that is almostcompletely disinvested.
    26. 26. Wholesale DemolitionPhoto from a block in Detroit where 60 of 66 housesare abandoned or vacant.Photo courtesy of: http://www.sweet-juniper.com/2009/04/singularity.html
    27. 27. Selective DemolitionSelective demolition acts as extra reinforcement to keepa neighborhood from further degrading. In practice, thismay be 1 or 2 houses, on average, per block in an eightblock neighborhood.Selective demolition is often appropriate inneighborhoods that still have vitality and market demand.Often these neighborhoods are called “tipping point”neighborhoods.
    28. 28. Leveraging the value of selective demolition• A strong social fabric, reflected in strong neighborhood or civic associations or neighborhood- level institutions• Active CDC-led stabilization or revitalization activities• Great market potential, such as distinctive housing stock, or location to a strong anchor intuition• A significant planned public investment, such as a new school
    29. 29. Selective Demolition
    30. 30. Dispersed DemolitionDispersed demolition removes isolated problemproperties before they start to negatively impactthe surrounding area.
    31. 31. Dispersed DemolitionIn suburban andurban areas,disperseddemolition can beappropriate forsingle problemproperties inotherwise strongmarketneighborhoods. Photo courtesy of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation
    32. 32. Dispersed DemolitionIn rural areas that do not have widespreadvacancies, dispersed demolition can beappropriate for:• Mitigating health/safety hazards, particularly in small villages• Harmonizing land use; for example removing an abandoned house near a county industrial park to address aesthetic and safety issues
    33. 33. Targeted AreasStrategic demolition maximizes benefits forcommunities.Identifying targeted areas (assumed inAttachment 3 ) maximizes the ability to bestrategic
    34. 34. Identifying “Target Areas”Prior to answering the five questions outlined inthe Moving Ohio Forward Application, localgovernments need to identify the specific“areas” or neighborhoods they are targeting.
    35. 35. Using Targeted Neighborhood Investment to Identify Target Areas in Cities• Targeted Neighborhood Investment is a strategy by which local governments choose to devote extra resources to specific communities.• The TNI strategy matches neighborhoods needs with the right resources to ensure funds are used as effectively as possible.
    36. 36. Youngstown TNI Example• Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation (YNDC) has focused its resources and energies on three specific neighborhoods which have been “tipping point” neighborhoods with declining housing values, population loss, and increased vacancies.
    37. 37. Youngstown TNI ExamplePublic, private, and nonprofit investments aretargeted to Crandall Park North, Lincoln Park,and Idora because these neighborhoods have:• Existing community networks and block groups• Majority owner-occupied homes• Access to community amenities• Attractive residences
    38. 38. Attachment 3Writing Attachment 3
    39. 39. Five Sections of Attachment 31. Building Conditions: – Provide a brief description of the dilapidated condition of buildings(s) selected for demolition with the following criteria as a guide.2. Failed market conditions – of target area and its relation to the rest of the surrounding community3. Stakeholder inclusion4. Contractors selection process5. Proposed land reuse options
    40. 40. Attachment 3 Section 1Of Attachment 3
    41. 41. Building Conditions– How does the targeted property/area affect neighboring property values, safety, and revitalization activities– How the building poses a danger to public health or safety– Likely cost to rehab building substantially outweigh the value– Description of other criteria that will be used to identify structures for demolition
    42. 42. Building Conditions:How targeted property affects neighboring property values, safety and revitalization activities?• Are property values of neighboring homes declining?• Is the building near a school/library/public park?• Is the building inhibiting new construction?• Has the neighborhood begun to see other revitalization activities?
    43. 43. Building Conditions: Danger to public health or safety• Has crime in the neighborhood increased?• Does the building pose an environmental concern?• Does the building fit the “blighted parcel” criteria?
    44. 44. Building Conditions: Cost of Rehab• Would the cost to rehab to 2X the cost to demolish?• Is there any substantial market value in rehabbing the home? Photo courtesy of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation
    45. 45. Building Conditions: Other criteria• Does the presence of the building add to the existing neighborhood texture? Would removing a building compromise the texture?• Does the demolition align with community priorities?• What are the market and neighborhood conditions?
    46. 46. Building Conditions: Collecting information• Much of this information has already been identified in a communitys Comprehensive Plan or through the work of the Community Development Department.• Some analysis can be obtained from a simple exterior survey of the building and its surroundings.
    47. 47. Building Conditions Decisions• Setting neighborhoods priorities will help determine demolition choices.• Besides emergency demolitions, demolitions should be made through a decision process that takes into account a range of factors.• Demolition decisions will not be clear-cut.• Decisions will involve balancing many different factors.
    48. 48. Attachment 3 Section 2Of Attachment 3
    49. 49. Failed Market Conditions– Does the housing stock constitute a present or potential nuisance (i.e. breed crime, negatively affect nearby property values)?– Are there additional safety concerns? Is the blighted property near a school?– Does demolition maintain the social fabric and historical nature of the neighborhood?– Percentage of owner-occupied buildings, absentee owner buildings, vacant buildings and vacant lots, if available.– Does demolition fit into the local government’s comprehensive plan of redevelopment for the overall community for improving property values, and increasing private investment and redevelopment? If so, how?
    50. 50. Failed Market Conditions: Local Governments look for– valuable impact on selected neighborhoods.– stabilization impact on select neighborhood, but surrounding communities as well by assessing the city and regional market and texture.– rooted in current revitalization activities and goals already outlined by the community.
    51. 51. Failed Market Conditions: Information Collection• Quantifying conditions can help justify demolition choices.• Informational data on crime rates, declining property values, median age of property, etc. can be found through: • jurisdiction’s community development department • jurisdiction’s police department • U.S. Census • FBI Crime Reports
    52. 52. Attachment 3 Section 3Of Attachment 3
    53. 53. Stakeholder Inclusion• Identify specific partners and stakeholders: • Nonprofits • Public entities • Community groups • Institutions, like collegesIdentify how stakeholder feedback is solicited: • Interviews • Public meetings • Surveys
    54. 54. Attachment 3 Section 4Of Attachment 3
    55. 55. Selecting ContractorsThe application should explain:• The process for selecting contractors for demolition• Provide a brief time-line to prove capacity and ability to spend funding in a timely manner.
    56. 56. Selecting ContractorsAttorney General requires contractors to have: – Liability Insurance – Workers Compensation – Checking the Federal and State debarment list – Documenting policy and procedures for barring poor performing contractors from continuing to participate in the program – Having policies regarding a Drug Free Workplace and EEO – Knowledgeable of and understand Ohio Ethics and Conflict of Interest of Laws.
    57. 57. Selecting ContractorsThere is no one specified process for selectingcontractors. Applicants have a variety of options whenchoosing contractors including: – Demolition as competitive bid – Demolition in-house with city crews and equipment – Put out competitive bid packages for multiple demolitions – Fixed Price or retainer contracts – Negotiated or sole source contracts – Deconstruction contractors
    58. 58. Attachment 3 Section 5Of Attachment 3
    59. 59. Land Reuse OptionsFor Question 5 the application requiresapplicants to describe proposed plans for landreuse options.The answer should describe the details for Selective demolition And/or Wholesale demolition
    60. 60. Land Reuse Options: StrategySelective and wholesale demolition leadsto the creation of vacant land.• Using established priorities, market and neighborhood conditions and feedback from stakeholders, local governments can develop a strategy for land post- demolition.
    61. 61. Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Improving commercial corridors,streetscapes, parks, and cleaning vacantlots at the same time, have the potentialfor the greatest impact on strugglingneighborhoods.
    62. 62. Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Home values can increase more than 25%when they are near improvements tostreetscapes, such as:• street tree plantings• container plantings• small pocket parks• parking lot screens and median plantings
    63. 63. Why is Land Re-use Strategy Important?Proximity to a neglected vacant lotsubtracts 20 percent from the base valuefrom a nearby homeA home near a stabilized lot—one that hasbeen improved through cleaning andgreening—increases by approximately15% the home’s base value
    64. 64. Land Re-Use StrategyDifferent demolition methods producedifferent land reuse options that localgovernments can undertake.
    65. 65. Selected Demolition example of Land Reuse Removed house to create green side lot on Brentwood St, YoungstownPhotos courtesy of YoungstownNeighborhood Development Corporation
    66. 66. Other Selected Demolition• Other options for selected site demolition include: – Side Lots – Mini-Parks – Park Expansion – Stabilization/minimal treatment – Pathways – Off-street parking
    67. 67. Wholesale Demolition example of Land Reuse Removed abandoned six-plex and replaced with an urban agriculture site. YoungstownPhoto courtesy of YoungstownNeighborhood Development Corporation
    68. 68. Other Selected Demolition• For larger scale demolition some land-reuse options include: – Community gardens – Community orchards – Urban agriculture – Daylighting streams, waterways and floodplains – Greening – Expansive Redevelopment
    69. 69. Other examples of Land Reuse Demolition can prepare a lot for potential reuse in the future
    70. 70. Attachment 3Attachment 3 Basics
    71. 71. Moving Ohio Forward Application Basics• Review Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program Demolition Guidelines before completing application.• Applications must include all attachments and supporting documentation.• Pages of the application without fill-in fields shall be typed using font size no smaller than 12 point.• All pages should be numbered indicating the section, attachment number and page number.
    72. 72. Example of Attachment 3Example Attachment 3Available at GOPC’s website:www.greaterohio.org.
    73. 73. Greater Ohio Policy CenterGreater Ohio Policy Center is available to adviseapplicants through:• Email• Phone• In person, as needed For our assistance, please contact: Samantha Spergel, Research Associate sspergel@greaterohio.org 614-224-1087
    74. 74. Moving Ohio Forward Grant Program for Demolition Funding QUESTIONS? Visit our website: http://greaterohio.org/ Read our Greater Ohio blog: http://greaterohio.org/blog Follow us on Twitter: @GreaterOhio Like Greater Ohio Policy Center on Facebook

    ×