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Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions
 

Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions

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Gives an overview of various Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions, open source and commercial ones are compared

Gives an overview of various Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions, open source and commercial ones are compared

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  • cd /tmp/mindi-busybox-1.7.3 make oldconfig make busybox make CONFIG_PREFIX=/usr/local/lib/mindi/rootfs install ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- cd /tmp/mindi-2.0.0 ./install.sh mindi 2.0.0-r1883 will be installed under /usr/local Creating target directories ... Copying files ... # mindi Mindi Linux mini-distro generator v2.0.0-r1883 Latest Mindi is available from http://www.mondorescue.org BusyBox sources are available from http://www.busybox.net ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Mindi-BusyBox v1.7.3-r1873 (2008-02-26 12:19:11 CET) multi-call binary Do you want to use your own kernel to build the boot disk ([y]/n) ? find: /boot/efi: No such file or directory No kernel matches exactly. Are there any duff kernels? Sorry, no duff kernels either Could not find your kernel. Analyzing dependency requirements Done. Making complete dependency list Done. Analyzing your keyboard's configuration. Searching for rc.config ...Unknown config detected. Default keyboard map will be used. Assembling dependency files.................................... Done. Your mountlist will look like this: 8 directories. lvmdiskscan not found. Won't handle LVM. DEVICE MOUNTPOINT FORMAT SIZE (MB) LABEL/UUID /dev/sdb2 / ext3 66891 /dev/sdb3 swap swap 1953 Tarring and zipping the groups........................... Done. Creating data disk #1...#2...#3...#4...#5...#6...#7...#8... Done. FATAL ERROR. PBDI - cannot find 57344 kernel Please e-mail a copy of /var/log/mindi.log to the mailing list. See http://www.mondorescue.org for more information. WE CANNOT HELP unless you enclose that file. # mkdir -m 755 /boot/efi # mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /boot/efi # mindi Mindi Linux mini-distro generator v2.0.0-r1883 Latest Mindi is available from http://www.mondorescue.org BusyBox sources are available from http://www.busybox.net ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Mindi-BusyBox v1.7.3-r1873 (2008-02-26 12:19:11 CET) multi-call binary Do you want to use your own kernel to build the boot disk ([y]/n) ? Analyzing dependency requirements Done. Making complete dependency list Done. Analyzing your keyboard's configuration. Searching for rc.config ...Unknown config detected. Default keyboard map will be used. Assembling dependency files.....................................Done. Your mountlist will look like this: 8 directories. lvmdiskscan not found. Won't handle LVM. DEVICE MOUNTPOINT FORMAT SIZE (MB) LABEL/UUID /dev/sdb2 / ext3 66891 /dev/sdb3 swap swap 1953 Tarring and zipping the groups........................... Done. Creating data disk #1...#2...#3...#4...#5...#6...#7...#8... Done. Making 16384KB boot disk...............udev device manager found ERROR: No product name found for Hardware support Hardware Information found and saved ... ......22934 blocks ......OK, you don't have a /boot/boot.b file, which is odd because most _good_ Linux distributions come with one, even if it's only a softlink grep: /etc/lilo.conf: No such file or directory Nor can I find it from your /etc/lilo.conf file. This is very odd. I'm going to use '' CBBF -- warning -- cannot find your boot.b file. That's it, I quit... (j/k) cp: `/tmp/mindi.BzNyJ29838/mountpoint.29836/elilo.conf' and `/tmp/mindi.BzNyJ29838/mountpoint.29836/elilo.conf' are the same file In the directory '/var/cache/mindi' you will find the images:- Done. mindi-bootroot.16384.img mindi-data-1.img mindi-data-2.img mindi-data-3.img mindi-data-4.img mindi-data-5.img mind i-data-6.img mindi-data-7.img mindi-data-8.img Would you like to create boot+data floppy disks now (y/[n]) ? Shall I make a bootable USB image ? (y/[n]) Shall I make a bootable CD image? (y/[n]) y Created bootable ISO image at /var/cache/mindi/mindi.iso Finished. Boot and data disk images were created. hpx189:/tmp/mondo-2.2.5# ls -l /var/cache/mindi/mindi.iso -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 54169600 Feb 26 14:05 /var/cache/mindi/mindi.iso ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- # cd mondo-2.2.5 # ./configure # make # make install
  • On Debian/IA64 # mondoarchive W E L C O M E T O M O N D O R E S C U E Making catalog of files to be backed up Done. Dividing filelist into sets Done. Copying Mondo's core files to the scratch directory Done. Calling MINDI to cr+-----¦ Generating boot+data disks +-----+ ¦ ¦ ¦ Generating boot+data disks ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ 1% ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Working.................... / ¦ +----------------------------------------+ DEVICE MOUNTPOINT FORMAT SIZE (MB) LABEL/U /dev/sda2 lvm lvm 0 /dev/sdb2 / ext3 66891 /dev/sdb3 swap swap 1953 Tarring and zipping the groups................................. Generating boot+data disks
  • Problem on Debian/IA64 via LAN Console => no reaction on keyboard because of newt and dialog
  • Only problem with mkCDrec v0.9.8 was the parted version. On RedHat Enterprise the layout of parted looks like: Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-34732.890 megabytes Disk label type: gpt Minor Start End Filesystem Name Flags 1 0.017 100.002 fat16 boot 2 100.002 32740.452 ext3 32740.452 34732.873 linux-swap And on Debian/IA64 it looks: Disk /dev/sdb: 73.4GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: gpt Number Start End Size File system Name Flags 1 17.4kB 100MB 100MB fat16 boot 2 100MB 71.4GB 71.3GB ext3 3 71.4GB 73.4GB 2049MB linux-swap Needed to change rd-base.sh script to get a good partitioning file. Next release (v0.9.9) will have the updated code. For the rest no difference with RedHat (for booting and recovering).
  • # rear -s mkrescue Relax & Recover Version 1.6 / 2007-12-05 Simulation mode activated, ReaR base directory: /usr/share/rear Source prep/default/01_progress_start.sh Source prep/ISO/default/30_check_iso_dir.sh Source prep/ISO/default/32_check_cdrom_size.sh Source prep/ISO/Linux-ia64/33_find_elilo_efi.sh Source prep/ISO/Linux-ia64/34_define_console_ia64.sh Source prep/default/99_progress_stop.sh Source dr/default/01_mk_config_dir_recovery.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/10_describe_physical_devices.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/11_describe_mountpoint_device.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/12_describe_filesystems.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/13_describe_swap.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/15_copy_proc_partitions.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/21_describe_md.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/23_describe_lvm2.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/29_find_required_devices.sh Source dr/Linux-ia64/30_mk_partitions_with_parted.sh Source dr/Linux-ia64/31_describe_device_properties.sh Source dr/GNU/Linux/80_copy_fstab_file.sh Source rescue/default/00_set_recovery_config.sh Source rescue/default/01_merge_skeletons.sh Source rescue/default/10_hostname.sh Source rescue/default/20_etc_issue.sh Source rescue/GNU/Linux/30_dns.sh Source rescue/GNU/Linux/31_network_devices.sh Source rescue/GNU/Linux/35_routing.sh Source rescue/GNU/Linux/40_kernel_modules.sh Source rescue/default/43_prepare_timesync.sh Source rescue/GNU/Linux/50_clone_keyboard_mappings.sh Source rescue/default/50_ssh.sh Source build/GNU/Linux/20_copy_as_is.sh Source build/GNU/Linux/39_copy_binaries_libraries.sh Source build/GNU/Linux/40_copy_modules.sh Source build/default/50_patch_sshd_config.sh Source pack/GNU/Linux/00_create_symlinks.sh Source pack/GNU/Linux/90_create_initramfs.sh Source output/ISO/Linux-ia64/20_mount_bootimg.sh Source output/ISO/Linux-ia64/30_create_bootimg.sh Source output/ISO/Linux-ia64/40_create_local_efi_dir.sh Source output/ISO/Linux-ia64/70_umount_bootimg.sh Source output/ISO/Linux-ia64/80_create_isofs.sh Source output/default/95_email_result_files.sh Source cleanup/default/01_progress_start.sh Source cleanup/default/99_progress_stop.sh Finished in 0 seconds. The only problem we had was with agetty which doesn’t exist on Debian (getty), but forgot to change inittab file. Solution is quite simple: /usr/share/rear/skel/Linux-ia64# ls -l sbin total 0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 11 Mar 13 16:09 agetty -> /sbin/getty Looking through the /tmp/rear.log file we can see the following: 2008-03-13 16:15:06 Including rescue/default/01_merge_skeletons.sh 2008-03-13 16:15:06 Adding 'default' 2008-03-13 16:15:06 Adding 'Linux-ia64' 2008-03-13 16:15:06 Adding 'GNU/Linux' 2008-03-13 16:15:06 No 'Debian/default' or 'Debian/default.tar.gz' found 2008-03-13 16:15:06 No ' Debian/ia64 ' or 'Debian/ia64.tar.gz' found 2008-03-13 16:15:06 No 'Debian/4.0' or 'Debian/4.0.tar.gz' found 2008-03-13 16:15:06 No 'REQUESTRESTORE' or 'REQUESTRESTORE.tar.gz' found

Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions Presentation Transcript

  • Linux Disaster Recovery Solutions IT3 Consultants Gratien D’haese March 2008
  • Agenda
    • What is Linux Disaster Recovery?
    • Why are backups not enough?
    • Commercial or Open Source?
    • Comparing 3 GPL DR on Debian/ia64
  • Some Definitions
    • What is Disaster Recovery?
      • The process by which a business function is restored to the normal, steady state after a disaster
    • What is Business Continuity
      • The way that a business function will operate after a disaster, until such time as the normal, steady state is restored
  • What is Linux Disaster Recovery
    • Like any other UNIX (including HP-UX) Linux is vulnerable for disaster to strike
    • The question really is “What shall I do if a disaster strikes?”
    • Dependent on:
      • HW failure (boot disk lost)
      • Lost everything (fire, water, earthquake, theft)
    • The answer: “Act immediately”
  • Why are backups not enough?
    • Backups of data are necessary!
    • Are not enough in case of losing the OS!
    • Reinstalling from scratch takes hours
    • Fine-tuning of configurations takes days
    • Even months later issues pop up!
    • It is absolute necessary to foresee an inventory of HW and SW
  • Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP)
    • DRP addresses need to recover from an emergency with minimum impact to the enterprise
      • Protects enterprise from major services failure
      • Minimizes risk to enterprise from delays in providing services
      • Guarantees reliability of standby systems by testing and simulation
      • Minimizes personnel decision-making required during disaster recovery
  • Commercial or Open Source?
    • There is no standard solution delivered with Linux as such
    • The choice is do we go for a commercial or Open Source solution?
    • Try before you buy I would say
      • It doesn’t always work as promised
      • Do we have test equipment? Don’t try it on production without a real DR test first!
  • Commercial Solutions (1)
    • Storix’ Adaptable System Recovery
      • www.storix.com
      • AIX/Linux backup – DR – cloning – HW migration (favors TSM integration)
      • Pro:
        • Supports IA32 and IA64 platforms
        • good support with regular updates
        • V6.2 is able to make bootable USB disk incl. backup
      • Contra:
        • is a backup solution with DR capabilities
        • GUI interface nice, but useless in DR scenarios
        • Too tight with TSM
        • Central server with clients model: administration overhead
        • Without a valid license no recovery?
        • Too much choices, hard to remember
        • Backups are useless without Storix’ software
  • Commercial Solutions (2)
    • Acronis’ True Image Echo Server for Linux
      • www.acronis.com
      • Backup/restore software with bare-metal DR possibilities
      • Pro:
        • Disk image restore
        • Nice GUI based solution
        • Good support
      • Contra:
        • Only x86 and x86_64 are supported
        • Is primarily a backup/restore solution
        • Console mode is a nightmare
        • Backups are useless without acronis’ software
  • Commercial Solutions (3)
    • Arkeia Options (of Arkeia Network Backup)
      • www.arkeia.com
      • DR from a central backup server
      • Pro:
        • Support
        • GUI based
      • Contra:
        • Only x86 and x86_64 are supported
        • Is primarily a backup/restore solution
        • No DR possible without network (central backup server)
        • DR scenario is Question/Answer game
  • Commercial Solutions Summary
    • If you decide to go for a commercial solution and you are willing
      • To pay for it
      • Wait for updates in case of problems
      • Need commercial support
      • Good documentation
    • Then go for Storix’ solution
  • Open Source Solutions (1)
    • We have 3 types here
      • DR optional with Open Source backup software
        • Similar comments as with the commercial ones
        • Completely dependent on backup solution
      • Image makers (cloning)
        • Disk to image or partition to image
      • True DR Open Source software
        • No focus on pure backups (incremental)
        • Main focus on fast DR
        • No fancy GUIs can be expected (nobody cares about a GUI if a disaster strikes)
  • Open Source Solutions (2)
    • Bacula, the network backup tool
      • www.bacula.org
      • Is a network based backup/restore program competing with e.g. TSM, DP, a.o.
      • Pro:
        • Open Source
        • DR CD-ROM creation based on mkCDrec
      • Contra:
        • DR is a option and runs behind with coding/fixing
  • Open Source Solutions (3)
    • Partimage
      • www.partimage.org
      • Saves partitions to an image
      • Pro:
        • Open Source
        • Image creation can be scheduled across network
        • Good for exact cloning
      • Contra:
        • Need extra soft (SystemRescueCD) to restore image from scratch
        • No explicit DR functionality
        • No flexibility to other HW
  • Open Source Solutions (3)
    • Clonezilla, a better ghost program
      • clonezilla.sourceforge.net
      • Saves partitions to an image
      • Pro:
        • Open Source
        • Based on partimage
        • Good for exact cloning across network (to 40 at a time) with clonezilla server
      • Contra:
        • Image creation done via special live CD, or via clonezilla-server and client program
        • No explicit DR functionality
        • Only for experienced users
  • Open Source Solutions (4)
    • Mondorescue
      • www.mondorescue.org/
      • Available since 2000
      • GPL DR supporting Linux (x86, x86_64, ia64) and FreeBSD (x86)
      • Support major Linux distributions
      • Target backup media includes CDR, DVD-R(w), USB/disks, tape, network
      • Understands major file systems including LVM, soft- and hardware RAID
  • Open Source Solutions (5)
    • Mondorescue
      • Pro:
        • Open Source with excellent support base (incl. HP)
        • CLI and GUI interface
        • Cloning supported
        • Uses a fail-safe Linux kernel (mindi)
        • Pretty good documentation
      • Contra:
        • Command line quite complicated to remember
        • Relies on different sub-products (mindi, mindi-busybox, afio,…)
        • Lacks integration with other backup solutions
  • Open Source Solutions (6)
    • Make CD-ROM Recovery (mkCDrec)
      • mkcdrec.ota.be
      • Available since 2000
      • GPL DR supporting Linux (x86, x86_64, powerpc, sparc and ia64)
      • Support major Linux distributions
      • Target backup media includes CDR, DVD-R(w), tape/OBDR, USB/disks, network (NFS/CIFS)
      • Understands major file systems including LVM, soft- and hardware RAID
  • Open Source Solutions (7)
    • mkCDrec
      • Pro:
        • Open Source with excellent support base
        • Only CLI with kiss in mind
        • Cloning support
        • Uses the active Linux kernel on rescue image
        • Integrates with 3th party backup sw (DP, TSM,…)
      • Contra:
        • Only 1 main developer
        • Documentation is minimal, but still enough/clear
  • Open Source Solutions (8)
    • Relax and Recover (rear)
      • rear.sourceforge.net
      • Available since 2006
      • GPL DR supporting Linux (x86, x86_64, ia64)
      • Support major Linux distributions
      • Target backup media includes CDR, DVD-R(w), disk, network (NFS/CIFS), rsync
      • Understands major file systems including LVM, soft- and hardware RAID
  • Open Source Solutions (9)
    • Relax and Recover (rear)
      • Pro:
        • Open Source with excellent support base
        • Only CLI with kiss in mind (LSB compliant)
        • Extremely modular code
        • Uses the active Linux kernel on rescue image
        • Integrates with 3th party backup sw (TSM, DP)
      • Contra:
        • Linux kernel => 2.6.x
        • Slow development (based on sponsoring)
        • Lacks good documentation
  • LSB rules of ReaR
    • Follows the Linux Standard Base rules
    • Configuration files are under /etc/rear/
    • The scripts are stored under /usr/share/rear/
    • One main script /usr/sbin/rear
    • rear is build around concepts:
      • mkrescue
      • mkbackup
      • mkbackuponly
      • recover
      • dump
  • Architecture of ReaR
    • rear dump:
    • Dumping out configuration and system information
    • System definition:
    • ARCH = Linux-i386
    • OS = GNU/Linux
    • OS_VENDOR = FedoraCore
    • OS_VENDOR_ARCH = FedoraCore/i386
    • OS_VENDOR_VERSION = FedoraCore/6
    • Configuration tree:
    • Linux-i386.conf : OK
    • GNU/Linux.conf : OK
    • FedoraCore.conf : missing/empty
    • FedoraCore/i386.conf : missing/empty
    • FedoraCore/6.conf : missing/empty
    • site.conf : OK
    • local.conf : OK
  • Architecture of ReaR (cont'd)
    • Shell scripts are stored under /usr/share/rear
    • Scripts are kept together according workflows
      • mkrescue (only make rescue image)
      • mkbackup (including make rescue image)
      • mkbackuponly (excluding make rescue image)
      • recover (the actual recovery part)
        • /etc/rear/recovery is being build dynamically
  • Workflow backup (or rescue)
    • mkbackup – mkrescue
      • Preparation (building the root file system layout)
      • Analyse (disaster recovery environment creation)
        • Creation of /etc/rear/recovery structure
      • Analyse (building the rescue system)
      • Build (copy all executables that are needed)
      • Pack (kernel and initial ramdisk)
      • Backup (optional)
      • Output (copy to destination, PXE, ISO,...)
      • Cleanup
  • Workflow recovery
    • The same configuration files are read during the recovery workflow
    • Recovery Process:
      • Verify (integrity and sanity check)
      • Recreate (file system layout)
      • Restore (the backups including Operating System)
      • Finalize (install boot loader, dump recovery log into /tmp of the recovered system)
  • Testing on Debian 4 (IA64)
    • We tested mondorescue, mkcdrec and rear on the same fresh installed Linux
    • IA64 is an new architecture (Linux based)
    • X86 and x86_64 are well tested and will most likely work very well for all of them
    • On the next slides we give our experience
    • Only used the sources of the 3 products to start with…
  • Test mondorescue
    • Prerequisites:
      • gcc, g++, make, gawk, afio, bzip2, cdrecord, mkisofs, parted, libnewt-dev, lvm2, buffer
    • Downloaded from ftp.mondorescue.org/src/
      • mondo-doc-2.24.tar.gz
      • mondo-2.2.5.tar.gz
      • mindi-busybox-1.7.3.tar.gz
      • mindi-2.0.0.tar.gz
    • Make DR archive: mondoarchive
  • mondoarchive
  • Boot mondorescue CD
  • Test mkCDrec
    • Prerequisites:
      • gcc, make, gawk, bzip2, cdrecord, mkisofs, parted, lvm2, rsync, iproute, bash
    • Downloaded from mkcdrec.ota.be
      • mkCDrec_v0.9.8.tar.gz
    • Make DR archive:
      • Edit Config.sh (change BOOTARCH, ELILO_DIR )
      • make
  • make (of mkcdrec)
  • New features in v0.9.9
  • Test ReaR
    • Prerequisites:
      • gawk, bzip2, cdrecord, mkisofs, parted, lvm2, rsync, iproute, mingetty, alien, lsb, bash
    • Downloaded from rear.sf.net
      • rear-1.6.tar.gz and rear-1.6-1.noarch.rpm
      • Install as follow:
        • alien –I rear-1.6-1.noarch.rpm
        • Edit /etc/rear/Linux-ia64.conf change agetty into getty
    • Make DR archive: rear mkbackup
  • Check us out at: www.it3.be