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Picasso and Africa
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A brief history of the influence of African masks on Picasso's Cubist paintings. …

A brief history of the influence of African masks on Picasso's Cubist paintings.

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  • 1. Picasso and Africa
  • 2. Picasso and Matisse were friends. One day Matisse bought an African Mask and showed it to Picasso. They both were amazed by the way the mask depicted the face.
  • 3. Picasso went to the museum in Paris and looked at all the African Masks on display there.
  • 4. Picasso went to the museum in Paris and looked at all the African Masks on display there.
  • 5. Soon Picasso was painting people who looked like they were wearing African masks. Head of Man, 1907
  • 6. How are these the same? How are they different? What parts of the face are exaggerated? Head of a Woman, 1907
  • 7. He even painted his good friend Gertrude like a mask! Portrait of Gertrude Stein, 1906 I think he made my nose too big!
  • 8. Then Picasso thought if he exaggerated the faces, why not show parts of the figure from all different sides at once? Eyes Mouth
  • 9. Soon Picasso had so many sides at once, that it was getting hard to tell what the painting originally was about. Portrait of Ambroise Vollard. 1910
  • 10. Really hard! Picasso called this way of breaking his painting into little cubes: Cubism Portrait of Kahnweiler. 1910