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First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
First do no harm pp presentation   for general use
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First do no harm pp presentation for general use

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This is a PowerPoint presentation summarizing the unethical, immoral and illegal acts of the power-hungry hiererarchy at the Burntwood Regional Health Authority in Northern Manitoba.

This is a PowerPoint presentation summarizing the unethical, immoral and illegal acts of the power-hungry hiererarchy at the Burntwood Regional Health Authority in Northern Manitoba.

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  • 1. “ First do no harm…” An Indictment of the Burntwood Regional Health Authority
  • 2. The Hippocratic Oath
    • Physicians take an oath to care for their patients to their full ability, to treat them with respect and dignity, and treat them as whole persons
    • Although the words “First
    • do no harm” are not actually
    • in the oath, this is the well-
    • known phrase that
    • summarizes their promise
  • 3. Universal healthcare in Canada
    • We are fortunate in Canada to have universal healthcare
    • Here, it is considered a right to have access to quality healthcare
    • The healthcare system promises "comprehensiveness, universality, portability, public administration and accessibility”
    • There is also a promise in Treaty 6
    • about provision of a “medicine
    • chest”
    • Most First Nations consider this
    • clause to be included as part of
    • the verbal in Treaty 5
  • 4. Healthcare in northern Manitoba
    • Healthcare in northern Manitoba, particularly in the BRHA region, does not reflect these Canadian medical ethics
    • The result has been terrible suffering and death for many First Nation peoples
    • In addition, over the past few years the region has not only abused patients, but employees and public funds
    • This presentation will summarize some personal stories of tragedy
    • It will also provide information on gross mismanagement by administration and top physicians in the region, leaving in their wake a trail of financial and human devastation
  • 5. Wendy Saric Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation
    • Wendy is a 33-year-old single mother
    • For three years, she went to the hospital and clinic complaining of worsening breathing problems and pain
    • There were countless visits over that period, involving at least half a dozen BRHA physicians
    • She was repeatedly told that she had asthma, and given inhalers and antibiotics
    • No tests or x-rays were ordered over any of these visits
  • 6. Wendy Saric (cont’d)
    • She should have had x-ray and a “pulmonary function test” (measuring the air passage to the lungs) to confirm asthma
    • When her problems continued to get worse, she should have had a “percussion” test (striking the tissues of the area being examined with the fingers or an instrument, listening for resulting sounds, and observing the response of the patient) – this would likely have shown the tumors.
    • Her breathing problems and general health continued to deteriorate
    • After three years of frustration, she asked for additional pain medication and a chest x-ray
    • The doctor accused her of being a “drug-seeker”
  • 7. Wendy Saric (cont’d)
    • She returned home in tears
    • Her roommate was furious – she called the hospital - they hung up on her three times
    • When she finally got through, she threatened a lawsuit if they did not perform some tests on Wendy
    • Only then did they perform a chest x-ray
    • She was diagnosed with advanced Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Type B
    • Over the years of misdiagnosis, the cancer had already spread to her pancreas, left ovary, and her eventually to her brain
    • She was given 6 months to live
    • She is currently in litigation with the BRHA et al
  • 8. Wendy Saric (cont’d)
    • The case generated a lot of publicity in the media as well as and Internet sites
    • Wendy’s cancer treatments, determination to live, and the support of her family and friends have helped her to overcome tremendous odds so far
    • However, the last year has
    • been like a nightmare,
    • It was avoidable had she
    • been given the most basic
    • medical treatment when
    • her symptoms started
    Wendy Saric with her mother, Sylvia, caregiver and biggest supporter
  • 9. Darryl Constant Opaskwayak Cree Nation
    • Darryl is 44 years old and has been HIV+ since 1991
    • He has been living in Vancouver, where there are supports and resources for those living with HIV/AIDS
    • In 2007, he became critically ill and ended up in a coma for several days
    • After he came out of the coma, he wanted to come home to Thompson to be with family if he died
    • Upon arrival, he was immediately admitted to Thompson General Hospital
  • 10. Darryl Constant (cont’d)
    • Instead of treating
    • him at the Thompson
    • hospital, he was
    • placed in the isolation
    • room on the pretext
    • that he had TB
    • He waited there
    • for three days,
    • terminally sick and
    • in terrible pain
    • Not one doctor
    • came to see
    • him in that time
  • 11. Darryl Constant (cont’d)
    • His desperate family gave him
    • body massage, and brought
    • in traditional medicine men
    • to help control his pain
    • In frustration, Darryl went into
    • the hallway looking for a doctor
    • He approached one physician,
    • who looked at him with disgust
    • and said “I am not your doctor…
    • you shouldn’t have come here…
    • we have nothing for you here”
  • 12. Darryl Constant (cont’d)
    • Finally, one doctor came to talk to him and when Darryl asked for pain control, the doctor accused him of being a “drug seeker”
    • He would not order any tests to see what was making Darryl so ill
    • He left Darryl there in the isolation room, suffering and untreated except for basic (and ineffective) pain medication
    • In disgust, Darryl ripped out the IV and went to his sister’s home in Thompson
  • 13. Darryl Constant (cont’d)
    • In disbelief, his sister called the hospital and said “something needs to be done here – he’s very sick”
    • Only then, the hospital agreed to send him to Winnipeg for tests
    • The Health Sciences Centre
    • immediately gave him an echo-
    • cardiogram (“echo”)
    • This showed that he had a
    • heart infection, curable by
    • antibiotics
    • Darryl could have died waiting in the isolation room at Thompson General Hospital, untreated
    “ Echocardiogram”
  • 14. Darryl Constant (cont’d)
    • At the time, Gloria King was VP at the BRHA
    • Ann Kaciulis, Darryl’s sister, called her and thanked her for sending her brother to Winnipeg
    • Her response was, “We do that for all patients”
    • If that were true, why did we have to fight so hard to get him the help he needed?
    • And why are there so many other people starting to voice their own stories of being improperly treated at the BRHA?
  • 15. Ann Kaciulis Opaskwayak Cree Nation
    • Ann had several negative experiences with the BRHA healthcare system
    • She first went to the clinic to see a BRHA physician complaining of intense groin pain
    • The doctor acted as though he didn’t believe her and minimized the problem
    • He said it was probably a pulled muscle
    • She did her own research, returned to the doctor, and requested an ultrasound to diagnose her problem
  • 16. Ann Kaciulis (cont’d)
    • She was diagnosed with a hernia, but he still did not believe she was in pain
    • Frustrated at being in pain, and this pain not being acknowledged, she needed to find someone who would listen
    • With her own money, she went to Winnipeg and Toronto to find out why she was in pain
    • Her Winnipeg doctor referred her to a surgeon, explained what the hernia was, and what might be causing the pain
    • Her excellent Winnipeg doctor has continued to work on the problem, keeping Ann informed and treating her with respect
  • 17. Ann Kaciulis (cont’d)
    • Ann then started getting lesions on her legs
    • It was difficult to diagnose, and again she took herself to Winnipeg to get diagnosed
    • The lesions were getting
    • larger and turning black
    • Finally, a Winnipeg doctor
    • diagnosed her with an
    • auto-immune disorder,
    • “ vasculitis”, which happens
    • when the immune system
    • attacks the blood vessels
    • by mistake.
    Ann Kaciulis’ leg lesions that could have led to amputation
  • 18. Ann Kaciulis (cont’d)
    • Thompson then referred her to a dermatologist, but the wait would be 6 months or more
    • Ann knew that the problem could not wait that long
    • Again, with her own money, she went to see a dermatologist in Winnipeg and was finally treated
    • The dermatologist told her that
    • if she had waited for the original
    • appointment scheduled by the
    • BRHA, she would “ probably
    • have lost both her legs to
    • gangrene ”
    Illustration of legs with advanced gangrene
  • 19. Ann Kaciulis (cont’d)
    • On another occasion, Ann went to the ER at Thompson General Hospital due to a cough that caused a lot of pain in her chest
    • Without tests or x-ray, she was diagnosed with bronchitis
    • She got cough medicine and an inhaler
    • She went to seek a second opinion with another doctor
    • He ordered bloodwork and x-ray
    • She did NOT have bronchitis, she had an infection and required antibiotics
    • If she had not sought a second opinion, the infection could have led to pneumonia
  • 20. Bertha Massan Shamattawa First Nation                    
    • Bertha complained of anemia and fatigue, which kept getting worse
    • The Thompson doctors should have ordered a stool analysis and a GI endoscopy (a tiny scope and camera that is inserted into the throat and goes down into the gastrointestinal system, like the stomach, to find the problem)
    • Several BRHA physicians examined Bertha, three of whom were specialists, who could have ordered some basic tests
    • Thompson also had a full-time surgeon at the time, who routinely performed endoscopies
    • This alone could have saved her life
  • 21. Bertha Massan (cont’d)
    • In all her visits, and in her worsening condition, none of these obvious tests were ever ordered
    • They suspected (but did not know) that she had a bacterial infection, and gave her massive doses of antibiotics
    • One major effect of prolonged exposure to antibiotics is yeast infection – this is basic medical knowledge and something all doctors are taught in medical school
    • At no time did they conduct this simple test
    • Bertha died on September 28, 2009 of a yeast infection in her oesophagus
  • 22. Bertha Massan (cont’d)
    • The Thompson doctors assumed that Bertha was an alcoholic and that the root of her problem was cirrhosis of the liver (no tests were performed to confirm this either)
    • At another point they thought she had TB, while missing the obvious symptoms and tests
    • Whether these assumptions were racially motivated is difficult to prove
    • We can only know that repeated lack of basic care caused her death
    • After she died, her husband Paddy was shocked and upset
  • 23. Bertha Massan (cont’d)
    • He went to MKO and KTC for help in answering questions
    • KTC interviewed him, and then dropped the matter
    • MKO didn’t even return his phone call
    • By the time he got some attention from his advocates, the statute of limitations for a lawsuit had expired
    • Mr. Massan plans a complaint to the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and will continue to draw attention to his wife’s unnecessary death in the media
  • 24. “ John Doe” Opaskwayak Cree Nation
    • In 2007, “John” went to the ER at Thompson General Hospital
    • He was very ill, and could barely walk into the examining room
    • No tests were performed
    • He was given Tylenol 3’s and told to go home
    • He returned several more times, each time increasingly weaker and sicker
    • Each time, he was sent home with T3’s even though there was no attempt made at a diagnosis
    • Shortly afterward, he died at home of sepsis (poisoning of the blood from untreated infection)
  • 25. “ John Doe” (cont’d)
    • This could have been easily prevented with antibiotics
    • If the hospital had done even a urine test, it would have indicated infection and he could have been treated – his life would have been saved
    • “ John” was an aboriginal man who lived in poverty, sometimes on the streets of Thompson
    • He wore shabby clothes
    • Is it possible that medical staff just wrote him off as a “drunk Indian” and tried to get him out of the ER as soon as possible?
    • What else could possibly explain why an obviously sick man would not receive the simplest tests to save his life?
  • 26. Sharon McIvor Pimicikamak Cree Nation
    • On March 14, 2008, Sharon went to Thompson General Hospital with dizziness, vomiting, and rapid eye movements
    • She was unable to walk
    • These symptoms normally indicate a brain disease
    • No tests were ordered or performed
    • She was diagnosed with an inner ear infection and given anti-allergy medication, Gravol, and an inhaler for asthma
    • She went back a week later because she had not gotten any better
  • 27. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • Her bouts of dizziness and her other symptoms got worse
    • She developed a feeling of being unbalanced, with tingling on the left side of her body
    • She kept returning to the hospital, even though her symptoms were getting very serious they continued to tell her it was an inner ear infection (with no tests to confirm this)
    • Since the physicians at the hospital couldn’t diagnose her properly, she went to the local clinic
    • She was given the same diagnosis
  • 28. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • On August 8, 2008, she went deaf in her left ear
    • She was finally referred to an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) specialist at the BRHA
    • She waited 3 weeks to hear from the ENT
    • She called the clinic, and found out they had not even faxed out the referral yet
    • She made the arrangements herself to have the referral sent to the ENT
    • The ENT performed a CT scan, which he said “showed nothing” and guessed it might be the “nerves in her cheeks”
  • 29. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • The ENT was very disrespectful to her, and rudely told her “she had boogers in her nose”
    • She answered “never mind my boogers, I can’t even wipe my own arse”
    • When her symptoms started, they would last 3-5 hours at a time
    • By the end of 2008, they would last 3-5 days
    • She made another appointment on her own to see the ENT because she was missing work and could barely walk
    • In February 2009, the ENT finally did bloodwork and sent her to see a specialist in Winnipeg
  • 30. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • He suspected she might have Ménière's disease, a disorder of the inner ear that causes vertigo (lack of balance)
    • She was given medication for vertigo
    • In the meantime, with her worsening symptoms, she repeatedly sought the help of Thompson doctors
    • They continued to prescribe anti-histamine, Gravol, and inhalers
    • The Winnipeg specialist ordered an MRI scheduled for August 8, 2009
    • While she was waiting, in May 2009 she collapsed at a local restaurant
  • 31. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • She was brought by ambulance to the hospital, where she was again wrongly diagnosed as having “a bad bout of gallbladder”
    • By this time, she nearly lost her bowel function and was practically in a vegetative state
    • She and her family knew that this had nothing to do with her gallbladder, and were frustrated with the constant misdiagnoses
    • She left a message for Gloria King, CEO of the BRHA, to report what was going on and to request an emergency MRI
    • Ms. King never returned her call
  • 32. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • Sharon was frightened and frustrated and becoming desperate
    • She spoke to a reporter and her story was publicized
    • She received an angry phone call from a senior physician/administrator at the BRHA, who tried to intimidate her and make her feel guilty for going public
    • He did not sympathize with her at all and only seemed concerned with the reputation of the BRHA
    • She tried to explain that because of her symptoms, she was having trouble understanding what he was saying
  • 33. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • She went back to the clinic (again) to see a doctor visiting from Winnipeg
    • She tearfully begged him to listen to her
    • She reported that she had been going to doctors for a year, she couldn’t hear, had double vision, was numb on one side of her body, and kept collapsing
    • She requested that she be sent for an emergency MRI
    • The visiting doctor recognized the seriousness of her condition
    • He ordered an immediate MRI
    • She finally went to St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg for an MRI on June 10 th , 2009
  • 34. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • She was correctly diagnosed with Chiari I Malformation (a brain disorder that leads to obstruction of brain fluid and paralysis)
    • She underwent several surgeries on her brain and spine, and had to have a shunt in her head to clear the way for the brain fluid
    • Her surgeon told her that if she had been diagnosed earlier, especially in the first 3 months, she would have had few complications
    • He also told her that at any point while she was being misdiagnosed repeatedly, she could have asphyxiated, had a heart attack, stroke, or gone into a coma because of the increasing pressure on her brain
  • 35. Sharon McIvor (cont’d)
    • When she returned home, the BRHA never provided home care
    • Because of the ongoing misdiagnosis and negligence in Thompson, she is
    • permanently disabled and continues
    • to suffer pain, dizziness, double
    • vision, tinnitus in her ear, and
    • partial paralysis.
    • She has initiated various formal
    • complaints and is considering a
    • lawsuit against the BRHA
    • Overall, she was misdiagnosed
    • 23 times over a period of 18
    • months
    Diagram illustrating the brain fluid blockage (where the shunt is inserted)
  • 36. Marilyn Lagimodiere Pimicikamak Cree Nation
    • Marilyn was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis 29 years ago
    • She was never told that her hips would degenerate and start “locking up”
    • She needed help rising from a sitting position because her hips were so stiff and painful
    • Although she is employed, it is difficult to enjoy family and work life when there is chronic and intense pain
    • She experienced increasing pain and stiffness in her hips, and in February 2006 started attending the clinic in Thompson
  • 37. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • She had been on Celebrex for years, but it was not helping her pain
    • Her doctor took her off the Celebrex, saying she had been on it too long, and prescribed extra strength Tylenol
    • This did not help and the pain and locking up increasingly unbearable
    • Around this time, her doctor informed her that she also had osteoarthritis
    • It had been in her file but nobody had informed her
    • Doctors tried various medications but none were effective
  • 38. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • She was consistently told that she was too young for hip surgery , even though was becoming increasingly disabled
    • She got attacks in her hips that lasted from 2 to 5 hours
    • When this occurs, she could not walk or stand, and was in tears from the pain
    • On one occasion, she was stuck sitting in a lawn chair for 5 hours because she could not get up until her hips unlocked
    • She had to be carried inside, still in the lawn chair, when it started to rain
  • 39. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • Marilyn became concerned about the medical treatment she was receiving from the Burntwood Regional Health Authority and felt she had to seek a second opinion
    • The treatment plans she received were completely ineffective
    • She did not trust the doctors at the BRHA because they neglected to inform her that she had osteoarthritis for so many years
    • She requested a referral to the a specialist at the Pan Am Clinic in Winnipeg
    • The request was refused
  • 40. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • Marilyn decided to attend the PanAm Clinic in Winnipeg on her own expense on December 7, 2009
    • She had an appointment right away and was seen at 11:00 a.m. that morning
    • They ordered x-rays
    • and was told that
    • her right hip was
    • in very bad shape
    • as there was no
    • cartilage left
    • All that could be done
    • for her was hip
    • replacement surgery
    Pan Am Clinic in Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • 41. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • She was finally scheduled for surgery on June 14, 2010 in Winnipeg
    • All the medical trips to and from Winnipeg were paid for out of her own pocket - this included hotel, meals, and mileage for herself and her escort
    • A letter was written to the BRHA requesting help, and they did agree to pay for one trip for surgery
    • If Marilyn had been told that she had osteoarthritis, and had received proper information about hip surgery years earlier, the problem would have been far less serious
    • However, like in so many other cases, negligence, misinformation, and misdiagnosis has claimed yet another victim
  • 42. Marilyn Lagimodiere (cont’d)
    • Marilyn is fortunate that she finally received treatment (in Winnipeg)
    • If she had not had the funds to travel, however, she would have continued to suffer at the hands of an incompetent health care system in the north
    • She would still be disabled and living in agony
    • How many other people are in this position but lack the funds to take matters into their own hands?
    • This is the job of our medical professionals
    • Too many people are having to travel to other locations at their own expense to receive appropriate medical treatment
  • 43. “ Jane Doe” * Northern Manitoba First Nation
    • “ Jane” is 24 years old, and at the time of this incident had just given birth to a baby
    • On November 9, 2010 she went to the clinic in Thompson to get a wart removed from her foot
    • Nobody told her how to treat the wound after surgery, or to watch for infection
    • That night a painful purple lump formed, but she thought this might be normal
    • The next night the lump was noticeably bigger and more painful
    • She went to the ER at Thompson General Hospital at midnight November 11, 2010
    • * This story is based on hearsay and is our understanding of what occurred
  • 44. “ Jane Doe” (cont’d)
    • In two days, the infection had spread from her foot all the way up to her knee
    • She was told she would need
    • intravenous antibiotics, as this
    • was a serious infection
    • She told them that she was
    • nursing, and wanted to make
    • sure that whatever she was
    • taking would be safe for her
    • baby
    • She received one IV antibiotic
    • dose that night, and was told to
    • return for two more rounds
  • 45. “ Jane Doe” (cont’d)
    • She returned that evening for her next dose, which went fine
    • The nurse told her to come back anytime after noon the next day for her last dose
    • The doctor would examine her foot and then decide if she needed more doses of antibiotic.
    • When she went in for her final dose on November 12 th , the nurse told her that she had mistakenly given her someone else’s medication!
    • Even more traumatic was the fact that she was given medication for patients with HIV/AIDS
    • She had to stop nursing “cold turkey” because of the risk to the baby, and this has negatively affected both mother and baby
  • 46. “ Jane Doe” (cont’d)
    • She had to take powerful medication as a precaution, and she felt nauseous, fatigued, and had constant diarrhea
    • Everything she eats goes right through her
    • She works as a lifeguard, and people with flu-like symptoms are not allowed in the pool
    • She has lost wages because of this, as well as the joy of life and new
    • motherhood
    • She is concerned her job
    • might even be in jeopardy
    • because she has to keep
    • telling her boss that she
    • can’t go in the water
  • 47. “ Jane Doe” (cont’d)
    • This mistake has cost Jane a great deal, physically, mentally, emotionally and financially
    • It could so easily have been avoided if she had been given proper instructions after surgery, and if proper checks and balances were used on the ward to ensure that patients receive the proper medication
    • The implications of such a mistake are enormous –it could have so easily been fatal
    • She could have been allergic to the medication she as given in error, and this could have caused death
    • Jane is very angry and no longer trusts the BRHA
  • 48. “ Jane Doe” (cont’d)
    • After this incident, Marion Ellis attempted to contact “Jane” by phone, but “Jane” would not take her call
    • “ Jane” then received an email from Marion’s daughter, a BRHA nurse, asking her not to contact a certain journalist who had been criticizing the BRHA
    • Again, the prime concern of the BRHA is not patient care, but damage control to their reputation
    • This is an example of the lengths they will go to protect themselves
    • This is not the first patient they have attempted to intimidate into remaining silent
    • This begs the question – how many more patients ARE remaining silent out of fear that if they speak out they will receive no care at all?
  • 49. Joan Saunders York Factory First Nation
    • In December 2008, Joan became ill and was medivac’d to Thompson General Hospital
    • She was not told she had a heart attack or given any information about her condition
    • She was put on oxygen
    • She was dizzy, unable to sleep, and very uncomfortable
    • She was not even provided with a facecloth so she could give herself a sponge bath
    • She tried asking for attention but the staff said they were too busy - she felt frightened and ignored
  • 50. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • A day after admission, she told a nurse she had not passed water for over 10 hours, but the nurse ignored her
    • She kept getting weaker, and reported that her legs were getting swollen
    • Again, she was ignored by nurses and doctors, and nobody from Aboriginal Services came to see her
    • Her family was not told how sick she was
    • Another patient was admitted at the same time as Joan, and witnessed her shabby treatment by staff
    • Finally, staff realized that she was experiencing kidney failure, but nobody told her what was going on
  • 51. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • She was put on a catheter and told she was going to Winnipeg
    • Nobody offered to pack her bags, and in her condition she had to find some orderlies to help her
    • It was only before she left for Winnipeg that a doctor finally came to see her and let her know what was happening to her
    • She left for Winnipeg at 1:00 a.m. with no escort
    • The plane was cold, and the pilot had to restart the plane several times before the heat came on
    • She waited 2 hours alone at the Winnipeg airport for the ambulance to take her to HSC
  • 52. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • Her family had not even been notified that she was being transferred to Winnipeg – her husband was very upset by this
    • Once she arrived at HSC, she was immediately put on dialysis as her kidneys had already been shut down for three days
    • She was treated very well in Winnipeg, and stayed for three weeks (right over Christmas 2009)
    • She was so ill she was prescribed 9 medications, and the doctor carefully explained the purpose of each one and showed her how to give herself insulin shots
  • 53. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • Joan was scheduled for an angiogram and angioplasty (heart surgery to prevent heart attack)
    • Her Winnipeg doctor also provided a letter stating that she needed an escort for all medical travel, and that she needed to travel by air due to her serious health condition
    • However, she continued to experience problems with her medical travel, and FNIH were sending her to and from Winnipeg by bus rather than by plane
  • 54. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • When Joan returned home to York Landing, there was a letter from Thompson General Hospital that she needed to come in for a colonoscopy
    • She informed the nurse that she had just returned from Winnipeg and was too sick to travel right away
    • The nurse insisted that she come anyway
    • She was told to fast prior to her appointment, so she could only have jelly and broth
    • Since Joan had diabetes, this was very damaging to her blood sugar – she was supposed to eat regularly
    • The plane taking her to Thompson was 5 hours late
    • She could have gone into a diabetic coma while waiting
  • 55. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • She had been told to pick up a prescription and drink 4 litres of water before coming to the hospital in Thompson
    • She stopped at Wal-Mart pharmacy
    • The pharmacist told her this prescription, that included very high potassium, could cause a fatal heart attack
    • She didn’t know what to do,
    • and was very lightheaded
    • and sick – likely her blood
    • sugar was high from lack
    • of food
  • 56. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • She tried to reschedule her appointment until she was feeling stronger but the hospital refused
    • She went to the appointment at the hospital and advised that she had not taken the prescription
    • The nurse insisted she have the procedure done anyway
    • She waited an hour for the doctor
    • This doctor seemed unaware that she had a history of heart attack and renal failure
    • She tried to explain why she had not taken the medication and was uncomfortable taking the test
    • The reaction of the doctor was shocking
  • 57. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • Instead of sympathizing and listening to her, he acted angry with her
    • He and a panel of medical staff began to question her, rudely and loudly, in front of other patients in the room
    • The doctor told her it was criminal how she wasted money from the system, and
    • how much it cost to bring her
    • from York Landing to Thompson
    • He did not even consider that
    • the fast and potassium he
    • prescribed could have killed her
  • 58. Joan Saunders (cont’d)
    • The doctor said he was going to write a letter of complaint to the Charge Nurse in York Landing about her refusal to take the test
    • She was humiliated – it reminded her of her treatment at residential school
    • After many traumatic experiences at Thompson General Hospital, she refused to return
    • She decided to wait for her heart surgery at home
    • At home, at least she was treated with dignity and respect
    • Her husband discovered her dead body on June 14, 2009
    • She had died of a heart attack; another tragic statistic of the BRHA’s lack of care
  • 59. Baby Girl McLeod Pimicikamak Cree Nation
    • Baby Girl McLeod was frequently getting sick with fever
    • Her parents kept taking her to the clinic and hospital in Thompson
    • The hospital did not test or treat the child
    • By the time they diagnosed the infection, there had already been a lot of medical damage
    • The child had to be on antibiotics for 6 months, and has to have her kidneys checked on a regular basis to ensure that they are functioning
    • She was one of the lucky ones – there was no permanent damage
  • 60. Baby Boy Beardy Pimicikamak Cree Nation
    • Baby Beardy was three years old at the time of this incident
    • He had been suffering from developmental delay and seizures
    • His parents took him to the Thompson General Hospital for help to control the seizures
    • Thompson was unable to help, yet refused to send him to a Winnipeg specialist
    • The parents kept asking why their son was being kept in the hospital when he could not be helped here
  • 61. Baby Boy Beardy (cont’d)
    • The BRHA finally agreed to send him to Winnipeg, after putting the child and parents through a traumatic time
    • They felt that the hospital and the ambulance drivers looked down on them, and kept referring to them as “dirty”
    • Their perception was that they were being blamed for the child’s seizures, and this is why they would not help them
    • The seizures were damaging to the baby’s brain, and should have been dealt with immediately
    • Once the child was sent to Winnipeg, a plan was put in place to control the seizures and help the family
  • 62. Meeting between MKO and BRHA re: patient complaints
    • In approximately April 2009, the MKO Grand Chief initiated a meeting with the BRHA to discuss complaints by MKO members about the standard of care they had received
    • In attendance were past MKO Grand Chief Sidney Garrioch, Roba McLeod, and Ann Kaciulis from MKO, and Gloria King, Marion Ellis, and Rusty Beardy from the BRHA
  • 63. Meeting between MKO and BRHA re: patient complaints
    • At the meeting, the cases of Joan Saunders, Baby Girl McLeod, Baby Boy Beardy, and an MKO Chief’s son were discussed in detail
    • MKO technicians mentioned that there were more complaints of a similar nature
    • The BRHA promised to look into the matter and report back to MKO
    • MKO was supposed to follow up with another meeting to ensure compliance with that promise
  • 64. Meeting between MKO and BRHA re: patient complaints
    • That meeting never occurred, and the matter was dropped
    • Joan Saunders died shortly afterward, never seeing justice done during her lifetime
    • This shows that the BRHA was aware of the complaints and chose to do nothing
    • Since that time, more complaints have become public
    • There has been no attempt by MKO or other First Nation organizations to make the BRHA accountable for their treatment of our people
  • 65. Abuse of public funds*
    • Overpaying for surgeons:
    • The BRHA drove out their last surgeon
    • last year
    • This has deprived all northern citizens of the last competent surgeon in the region
    • It also will cost an additional $750,000.00 in extra locum costs (the cost of flying in surgeons) per year
    • It would inconvenience countless patients who must now use public monies to travel to and from Winnipeg with escorts
    • It could take years to replace this
    • surgeon, as it is difficult to attract
    • and retain highly skilled practitioners
    • in this region
    • * Information in next sections based on article by Guisti, H. in Grassroots News , January 19, 2010
    • “ BRHA must Walk the Talk”, (18 & 23) & February 16, 2010, “Incompetent Northern Hands” (17)
  • 66. Abuse of public funds
    • Administration costs spike by millions:
    • BRHA administration costs jumped nearly 400% in 2003-2004 to 2007-2008
    • Costs jumped from $1,558,000.00 to nearly $6,000,000.00 - an increase of $4,442,000.00
    • This was the highest administration costs, per budget, of all regional health authorities in Manitoba
    • This issue was touched on by Tom Brodbeck, journalist from the Winnipeg Sun, in his blog
    • The issue was further raised by the Opposition in the legislature June 2 (hansard transcriptions can be provided)
  • 67. Abuse of public funds
    • Northern Patient Transportation Program:
    • The enormous $7,200,000.00 NPTP program may be in need of an exhaustive 10 year audit
    • The Liberal Party of Manitoba put out a press release February 11, 2009 (available by request)
    • In spite of this massive
    • spending, patients in the
    • north are still fighting to
    • get appropriate transpor-
    • tation to and from medical
    • appointments
    • If the BRHA was able to
    • provide better care, transpor-
    • tation costs would be lower
  • 68. Abuse of public funds
    • Shortage of ER physicians:
    • Dr. Nizar Joundi, the backbone of the ER, suddenly left his employment at the BRHA
    • Why did he leave?
    • Dr. Botha left afterwards so Dr Eiman had to replace Dr. Small in Gillam
    • It cost the tax payers $3,668,000.00 in locum costs (costs of transporting medical personnel on a temporary basis) to cover the ER shortage in 2008-2009
    • This was up from $1,450,000.00 in 2006-2007
    • This is an increase of $2,218,000.00 in only 2 years
  • 69. Abuse of public funds
    • Anaesthesiologist failure costs over a $million:
    • When the BRHA anaesthesiologist left, i t cost the tax payers an additional $1,000,000.00 in locum costs (cost of bringing in anaesthesiologists for surgeries taking place in the BRHA region)
    • It took 2.7 years to replace the anaesthesiologist.
    • Journalist Paul Therrien noted in the Winnipeg Free Press that he should have been replaced in spring (“early next year”) of 2009
    • He was not replaced until months later in fall 2009
    • The BRHA has a consistent record of not replacing critical medical personnel
    • The administration is extremely sloppy, and is sending costs soaring
  • 70. Abuse of public funds
    • Wasting a half million dollars?
    • The BRHA hired a third obstetrician when there clearly was a glut of obstetric services in Thompson
    • Eight months after hiring Dr. Hussam Azzam, they kept hiring a non-BRHA, fee-for-service physician, Dr. Kania
    • Dr. Kania performed 71%
    • of the BRHA’s births while
    • the three salaried BRHA
    • obstetricians COMBINED
    • only handled 29% of the
    • births
  • 71. Abuse of public funds
    • An across-the-board fair comparison gives Dr. Kania 5.7 births for every 1 birth by a BRHA obstetrician
    • Every time a non-salaried physician had to come in for births, it was at enormous cost to the region
    • They didn’t need the third obstetrician they hired – two of them could easily have handled the workload
    • Instead, they hire an extra physician, and STILL hired outside help to do most of the births!
    • Why are the salaried obstetricians not doing their jobs?
    • Why are they over-hiring salaried physicians, and then still hiring expensive outside physicians to do their work?
  • 72. Abuse of public funds
    • Huge jump in nursing locum costs:
    • Under this administration, nursing locum costs jumped from $640,751.00 in 2005 (just over half a million $) to $3,715,000.00 (almost $4 million) in 2008
    • This is an increase of approximately $3 million, or 579%
    • Our nurses are leaving the BRHA
    • in huge numbers…why is that?
    • They are not being replaced
    • Is this because the BRHA is unable
    • to attract nurses to the region?
    • Or are they not even trying to
    • replace them?
  • 73. Abuse of public funds
    • Failure to commit pediatrician?
    • 15,000 Aboriginal children were deprived of a regular pediatrician when Dr. Barodia bolted after only 6 months on the job
    • It also cost the tax payer’s around a million dollars in added locum costs to replace him over the past year
    • Dr. Barodia claimed to his colleagues that the BRHA never committed him to a 2 year contract
    • His assessment took 6 months and around $80,000.00
    • The Opposition raised this issue in the legislature last April
  • 74. Abuse of public funds
    • Overpaid senior administration:
    • In spite of a shocking lack of competence, VP Marion Ellis and CEO Gloria King made more money than the Minister of Health, Theresa Oswald
      Gloria King CEO, BRHA Marion Ellis VP, BRHA Theresa Oswald Minister of Health
  • 75. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Wrongful terminations:
    • A senior physician/executive administrator was seen in the company of a young woman, not his wife
    • This was witnessed by the executive assistant of VP Medicine Dr. Hussam Azzam
    • She texted the assistant to the VP Aboriginal Affairs, asking if she knew what was going on
    • Administration found out about the text and fired them both, moments apart
    • They were fired for simply inquiring about the conduct of a senior official at the BRHA
  • 76. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Fear of accountability:
    • A journalist from Grassroots News officially questioned the BRHA about firing the two secretaries
    • He sent it to the official work e-mail of Dr. Azzam
    • Dr. Azzam threatened him with a lawsuit simply because he was asked about this
    • Dr. Azzam’s reply was highly unprofessional, and bordered on criminal
    • “ uttering threats”
  • 77. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Here is the email, exactly as the journalist received it:
      • Your reply reflect your level,culture and personality! So not surprising at all!! You should be worried and careful .As you now that you will not afford crossing the “professional” line although I know that you never been professional!!...So you should be scared!! You have been walking on a very thin ice lately and I really wish and hope you cross the line! Please do!”
    • The content and aggressive tone are shocking, coming from a senior physician and executive administrator
    • Even the spelling and vocabulary are poor, as if written by a very young person
    • It begs the question as to the maturity and character of the people running the show at the BRHA
  • 78. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Defamation of Dr. Sardiwalla:
    • Dr. Sardiwalla was the senior surgeon in the BRHA for 7 years
    • He had constant intense arguments with senior management after this administration was in place
    • There was an issue with the renewal of his medical license, and the BRHA did not help in spite of his many years of service
    • He finally left and started practicing on the east coast, where he enjoyed his work and was doing well
    • A critical article about the BRHA appeared in the news, and BRHA senior management started to harass Dr. Sardiwalla to “rebut” the allegations
  • 79. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Defamation of Dr. Sardiwalla:
    • He could not do this in good conscience because the allegations were true
    • He consistently ignored their requests
    • The final request was a phone
    • call by Dr. Tassi, strongly “urging”
    • him to write the rebuttal
    • He still refused, so Dr. Tassi
    • threatened him
    • He told him that if he didn’t send
    • in the rebuttal he "will never be
    • able to work in the BRHA as
    • locum or full time ever again."
  • 80. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Defamation of Dr. Sardiwalla:
    • Dr. Sardiwalla still refused to give in to their coercion, so they contacted his current employer and slandered him
    • After all his years in the BRHA, he
    • said the current administration was
    • the “worst”
    • This seems to be the way senior
    • management operates – if
    • physicians are not complicit
    • in the cover-ups, they are
    • “ blackballed”
  • 81. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Harassing whistleblower?
    • Dr. Adil Ibrahim, who worked as a physician at the BRHA, claims he handed management a lengthy “40-point,15-page document on cases of BRHA mismanagement and excesses.”
    • As a result, “…they harassed,
    • humiliated and intimidated me
    • till I was forced to resign.”
    • He now works in Pine Falls
    • where he says “I had more
    • respect in one and a half months
    • here than at 3 years at the BRHA.”
  • 82. Abuse of BRHA employees
    • Failure to retain physicians:
    • Under this administration nearly 40% of the full-time physicians handed in their resignations in 13 months
    • VP Paul Therrien noted in the Winnipeg Free Press on November 16, 2010 “we know we are going to lose four or five people in the course of the year”
    • They lost 12 or 240-300% more
    • Many of the physicians who bolted over the past 3 years fled because of conflict with or failure of management
    • This was raised by the Opposition in the legislature on April 16, 2010
  • 83. Ineffective management
    • Mental Health Failure:
    • In the first 9 months of 2009, nearly half of the mental health team in Thompson resigned, went on leave or were looking for work elsewhere
    • Some were extremely disgruntled and disappointed with management and demanded to meet with Gloria King
    • In clear violation of her announced “Open Door Policy”, she refused and referred them back to the two managers about whom they had complaints!
    • The Opposition raised it in the legislature during Mental Health Awareness Week on October 5, 2010
  • 84. Ineffective management
    • Conflict of interest:
    • Dr. Hussam Azzam is not only VP Medicine, but is also Chief of Staff
    • Two positions that account to each other should typically NOT be held by the same individual
    • In addition, he was also at one time Acting Head of Family Physicians
    • His sister Dr. Lina Azzam is head of Surgical Services
    • This much power concentrated in one person can explain why irrational decisions are made, and there are no checks and balances
  • 85. Ineffective management
    • Deteriorating maternal outcomes:
    • From 2004 to 2008 in the BRHA, still-births, newborn deaths, and the number of newborns readmitted to hospital doubled
    • More mothers had to be
    • readmitted due to compli-
    • cations than any other RHA
    • outside Winnipeg
    • The Opposition raised it in the
    • legislature and issued 2 press
    • releases on the subject
    • They also sent a “Letter to the
    • Editor” of Thompson Citizen
    • and Grassroots News
  • 86. Ineffective management
    • Spike in nursing vacancies:
    • Under this administration
    • (from 2006 – 2009) the
    • number of nursing vacancies
    • has gone up 250% - from
    • 12 to 30
  • 87. Ineffective management
    • Lack of concern for Aboriginal representation:
    • In spite of the fact that the
    • BRHA serves mostly Aboriginal
    • people, they are very casual
    • about whether or not they
    • have an Aboriginal person
    • on the Senior Executive Council
    • In other words, no aboriginal
    • people are then involved in
    • decision making for their own
    • region
  • 88. Ineffective management
    • Lack of concern for Aboriginal representation:
    • There was a 500-day gap where there was no Aboriginal person on the Council
    • The BRHA excuse was that they needed that much time to find a suitable candidate
    • This is clearly not true, since there are many qualified Aboriginal people in the north, and they only posted the position 2.5 months before they hired Rusty Beardy
    • A journalist from Grassroots News wrote and op-ed piece about this and was interviewed by CBC radio on this subject
  • 89. Ineffective management
    • Failure to recruit physicians:
    • The BRHA had 34 full-time physician on their payroll in March 2008
    • Ten months later they had only
    • 23, including new recruits
    • This is a 12 month net loss
    • of 39%, which includes all
    • new recruits
  • 90. Ineffective management
    • Patient complaints:
    • Over the four fiscal
    • years 2003-2008,
    • the number of
    • patient complaints
    • shot up 237%
  • 91. Ineffective management
    • The few physicians employed by the BRHA are not culturally appropriate
    • There is not one Aboriginal physician in the BRHA
    • Most of them are brought in from other countries, where none speak the traditional languages and do not understand First Nation culture
    • Sometimes there is a language barrier where patients find it difficult to understand the physician
    • There is no cultural training for medical professionals working in the north
    • This often results in poor communication and understanding between physician and patient
  • 92. Public Health: What is it?
    • Public health relates to contagious diseases that can become epidemics
    • For example, TB was eradicated in Europe in the late 1800's not through medication but by improvement in social conditions
    • This includes vaccinations, sanitation,
    • clean water, water fluoridation,
    • garbage collection, healthy lifestyle
    • (good nutrition, hand-washing,
    • exercise, healthy housing, addictions
    • treatment, recreation), etc
    • It also includes public prevention
    • measures, and quick and adequate
    • response to outbreaks
  • 93. Public health: Third world vs. wealthy nations
    • Diseases generally fall into two categories
    • These are those that affect:
      • Third world countries
      • Wealthy nations
    • For example, tuberculosis,
    • malaria and brucellosis
    • (chronic flu) are diseases
    • of the poor nations
    • Colon cancer and cardio-
    • vascular diseases (heart
    • attacks) are generally
    • considered diseases of the
    • developed countries
  • 94. Public Health: Critical to life
    • In the West, since 1920, life expectancy has shot up by 30 years
    • This is due mainly to mainly to improved public health
    • This is far more important
    • than advances in
    • medical treatment to
    • decrease disease and
    • improve life expectancy
  • 95. Public Health: Third world conditions in the north
    • Whenever Third World diseases strike some parts of the developed world, it is usually because of a failure of public health
    • Northern First Nation reserves rate very poorly on public health
    • Healthy food is expensive, poor sanitation systems, mould in houses, overcrowding, and many others
    • This makes the north vulnerable to outbreaks that do not affect the rest of Canada
    • There has been an alarming outbreak of several 'Third World' diseases northern Manitoba over the past two years
  • 96. Public Health: Vaccinations
    • Obviously, not all aspects of public health can be fixed by the health care system
    • But the health authority has an enormous role to play in these outbreaks
    • One of these responsibilities is vaccinations
    • For example, provincial health officials confirmed there's been a recent upswing in the number of reported cases of pertussis (whooping cough) in 2010
    • All children in Manitoba are supposed to be vaccinated, so this is a failure of the BRHA to protect its citizens
  • 97. Public Health: MRSA
    • There has also been an outbreak of the super-bug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)
    • This is a serious infection people usually get from hospitals
    • In 2008, Canadian Public Health Agency (CPHA) reported that MRSA rates in remote First Nation reserves in Manitoba were “30 times higher than the Canadian average.”
    • The CPHA stated that 1,000 positive test results were reported from Aug. 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010.
  • 98. Public Health: An Elder’s story
    • In 2006, a dignified, traditional Elder in Thompson General Hospital became seriously ill with infection
    • The hospital refused to provide him with antibiotics (reason unknown)
    • His wife was worried, and by his
    • side all the time
    • Two advocates found out
    • what was going on and
    • wrote letters to Gloria King
    • demanding that the Elder
    • receive antibiotics
  • 99. Public Health: An Elder’s story
    • Instead of immediately providing antibiotics for this suffering man, the hospital told his devoted wife that she had infected him
    • The advocates found her in tears the next day, thinking she had made her husband
    • sick
    • It turned out to be MRSA, which
    • he would have gotten from the hospital
    • They finally agreed to give him
    • antibiotics, but only after there
    • was a threat to publicize the matter
  • 100. Public Health: TB
    • The situation with TB is even worse
    • The latest provincial disease statistics reveal Manitoba recorded 156 TB cases in 2009 -- the highest number recorded in a single year since the late 1970s
    • In the past four years TB cases have jumped by 50 per cent, leaving Manitoba with higher rates of the disease than any other province
    • A recent Winnipeg Free Press series revealed some Manitoba First Nations have recorded some of the highest rates of TB in the world since the mid-1970s
  • 101. Public Health: TB
    • Some northern Manitoba communities have recorded more than 600 cases of TB per 100,000
    • By comparison, Canada's national rate is five cases per 100,000
    • This means that these northern communities have 120 times the national average
    • rates of TB
    • Who would have thought
    • we would have an outbreak
    • of TB in this day and age?
  • 102. Public Health: H1N1 – Response of MKO and KTC
    • The response of MKO and KTC to the impending outbreak of H1N1 was immediate, efficient and thorough
    • Staff were sent to Winnipeg for a week to train on how to handle a pandemic
    • Trained staff were then sent to all the MKO communities to take stock of what was available on reserve, what was needed, and to train health professionals and the public on prevention and containment
    • Each community then hired a pandemic coordinator
    • The BRHA was not involved in this process
  • 103. Public Health: H1N1 flu
    • Most people
    • remember the
    • H1N1 pandemic
    • that hit
    • Burntwood last
    • year with an
    • incidence rate of
    • 900% the
    • provincial
    • average
  • 104. Public Health: Flesh-eating disease
    • From 2005-2007 there was an outbreak of Necrotizing Fasciitis , known as “flesh-eating disease”
    • With death possibly striking in less than 24 hours, it is the fastest known killer
    • on this planet
    • The incidence rate in
    • Burntwood in 2006 was
    • 16,500% the national
    • average
    • The BRHA covered it up
    • until it was exposed by a
    • Grassroots News reporter
  • 105. Public Health: Who is responsible?
    • Some responsibility lies with each individual, to make healthy choices (nutritious diet, exercise, hand washing, etc.)
    • The federal government, together with First Nation leadership, are working on improving the living conditions in the north
    • However, the responsibility of
    • public health in the reserves lies
    • mainly with Health Canada
    • The regional health authorities,
    • including the BRHA, have the
    • front-line responsibility
  • 106. Public Health: Responsibility of BRHA
    • Under the Manitoba Public Health Act , the BRHA is mandated to do three things with these kinds of diseases:
      • Investigate
      • Control
      • Protect the public
    • This means admitting an outbreak exists and undertaking an aggressive public health awareness campaign
    • The BRHA has a miserable record on handling pandemics, which is allowing the problem to
    • continue
    • Instead of dealing with the problem head-on, they have stayed silent
  • 107. Sexual abuse of patient
    • There has been at least one confirmed complaint of sexual molestation of an attractive female patient
    • This patient accused a senior physician/executive administrator of unnecessarily pulling down her gown without her permission
    • She was traumatized by the incident
    • and made a formal complaint to
    • the College of Physicians and
    • Surgeons
    • The outcome of the case is not
    • yet known
  • 108. Conflict of interest?
    • Does the BRHA provide MKO or any other First Nation organization with program monies?
    • Are there programs which are funded in partnership between MKO and the BRHA?
    • It seems strange that our leaders would allow these serious allegations to be pushed under the rug
    • It is the role of our elected leaders
    • and First Nation organizations to
    • speak up on behalf of our people
    • If they do not do this because
    • there is financial dependency,
    • this would be a conflict of interest
  • 109. Media attention
    • People have been becoming more vocal about mistreatment in the northern Manitoba healthcare system
    • Many articles have been published over the past few years criticizing their operations and treatment of patients
    • Wendy Saric’s story garnered
    • international attention
    • One critical journalist was barred
    • for life from BRHA meetings
    • A “high-ranking BRHA official”
    • attempted to blackmail this
    • same journalist from publicly
    • criticizing the BRHA
  • 110. Media attention
    • There are now numerous websites about the critical state of healthcare in northern Manitoba
    • Many of these sites have attracted global attention, including people from Australia, United States, and even Africa
    • There have been worldwide offers to help in any way they can
    • Some of these sites include:
  • 111. Political criticism
    • On August 17 th , Dr. Jon Gerrard, Liberal Party Leader of Manitoba, wrote a sharply worded article in Grassroots News about how the BRHA is trying to control the negative publicity
    • He stated:
      • “ The BRHA is trying to silence the
      • critics of its poor performance and
      • in doing so is trying to convince you
      • that the level of health care you are
      • receiving is excellent”.
    • He stated that barring a journalist from
    • meetings only confirms that they have
    • something to hide
  • 112. A light in the darkness….
    • The BRHA has had an enormous accomplishment with Northern Spirit Manor, the new 35-bed personal care home
    • The home is a benchmark and should be used as an example for other personal care homes
    • The design of the building is lovely…the seniors have big windows in their rooms, some with a view
    • The programs are run smoothly, and staff bring a positive atmosphere that is immediately noticeable
    • This positivity transfers to the seniors themselves, who seem happy and at home
    • If the rest of the BRHA were run like this, we would have an excellent standard of care in this region
  • 113. Debates in the provincial Legislature
    • The northern healthcare crisis and the actions of the BRHA have been brought up numerous times in the provincial legislature
    • Ample evidence has been brought forward that the BRHA in particular is mismanaging healthcare and neglecting and abusing patients
    • In spite of this, no action has been taken by the
    • Province
    • With some notable
    • exceptions, our own
    • leaders have mostly
    • been silent
  • 114. Support from our leadership
    • Former Chief Jim Moore of the
    • Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation
    • publicly demanded to know why the BRHA is failing First Nations in their delivery of healthcare
    • He stated:
      • “ There have been many reports lately by First Nation members about the incompetence and negligence of the BRHA and instead of taking responsibility for the state of health delivery in the BRHA region, senior management seems to be attempting to sweep the mess under the carpet and continue with the status quo”
  • 115. Other First Nation leadership support
    • There are some other First Nation leaders who recognize the seriousness of this problem
    • Chief Michael Constant of OCN is supportive of efforts to clean up the mess at the BRHA and make them accountable for their treatment of patients
    • Chief Garrison Settee of PCN stated to Ann Kaciulis:
      • “ We will be bringing up the issues you have been talking about at the MKO Health Conference in March [2011]”
    • Chief Jeffrey Napoakesik of Shamattawa told Paddy Massan that he “supports him 100%” with regard to getting answers about the death of his wife, Bertha
  • 116. Other First Nation Leadership Support
    • Current Chief Primrose of NCN has been very supportive of Wendy Saric
    • There are likely many other MKO chiefs who have been unaware of the extent of the problems at the BRHA
    • If they had been aware, they would likely have taken action on the issue
    • The BRHA has been trying very hard to cover up their mistakes, so it is not surprising that their efforts have been successful to some degree
  • 117. Damage control
    • On November 24, 2010, the BRHA praised their own performance at their Annual General Meeting
    • A follow-up article was published in the Nickel Belt News on December 3 rd with the headline “BRHA claims to have made strides”
    • In attendance were an MKO Chief and past Chair of the BRHA board (who spoke on behalf of the MKO Grand Chief), and the KTC Grand Chief, praising the performance of the BRHA
    • Why would our leaders support an institution that is consistently hurting our people?
  • 118. Why has nothing been done?
    • The issues at the BRHA have been published extensively in newspapers and other media
    • There have been lawsuits and letters of complaint to the Minister of Health
    • Issues have been raised in the Manitoba legislature
    • How is it possible that nothing has been done about it?
    • Why is the Minister of Health and the Manitoba Premier allowing this to continue?
    • If Manitoba First Nation leaders get together on this, ACTION WILL BE TAKEN
    • It is our money that’s being wasted…our citizens at risk…our people who are suffering.
  • 119. Call for public Inquiry
    • In the February 16, 2010 issue of Grassroots News , Southern Chiefs Organization called for a “Public Inquiry into Aboriginal Health”
    • This would be equivalent to the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry
    • The article mentioned tragedies that occurred in southern Manitoba
    • The problem in northern Manitoba is magnified many times, and the care northern patients receive is grossly inferior to that of the rest of the province
    • An Inquiry would publicly expose the issues and force change
  • 120. MKO Resolution
  • 121. A special “thank you”…
    • We would like to express our thanks to Dr. Hussain Guisti, physician, journalist and activist
    • Without his courageous determination to uncover corruption in the northern healthcare system, and exhaustive research, many of these issues would have been swept under the rug
    • All northern medical patients owe
    • a debt to him for advocating
    • tirelessly on their behalf
  • 122. Wendy’s Dreams and Tears Hot, scalding, burning down my cheeks.... Looking at my children...., it makes me weep. So many questions, the tears blind me...... Crying for the grandchildren, I may only see ...from the spirit world…crying for me. My mother, my father... I watch them weep. Helpless, powerless...I can’t sleep. My sister’s arms, I feel around me... Hot tears, falling, falling, falling...forever falling. My strength, my rock…it rips her heart… Fearing I may soon depart. My brothers, how I love you... I feel your pain, I want to hug you, And hug you and hug you. What can I do? What can I do? I want to live, I pray each day... “Why did they not help me?” I pray…and pray. They took an oath... on the bible they swore. “First do no harm” was their rallying call. “Why did they neglect me? THEY caused me to fall!” There is only one thing I want right now... I WANT TO LIVE AND I VOW... To fight this monster and the ones who harmed me. I have the Creator all around me. I won’t go with just a whimper...I have my family, my friends and the faith to know...there are plans for me...so I won’t go. ~ Written for Wendy Saric by Ann Kaciulis and Karen Chevillard
  • 123.
    • Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation
    • Created by Pamela Groening
    • March 2011

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