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S peters final_dse

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Susan Peters UNESCO Presentation for SPED 5091

Susan Peters UNESCO Presentation for SPED 5091

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  • 1. UNESCO: Inclusive Education and Public Policies Susan Peters, Ph.D. Michigan State University Speters@msu.edu
  • 2. Anything is possible: reaching for thedream
  • 3. Question #1• What are the current dimensions of the phenomenon of exclusion from and within education? What kind of indicators and data are used to inform inclusive education policies?
  • 4. Tomasevski’s Exclusion from Education from A to W๏ Abandoned children ๏ Illegal working children ๏ ๏ Street children๏ Abused children Illiterate children ๏ Trafficked children๏ Arrested children ๏ Imprisoned children ๏ Traveller children๏ Asylum-seeking children ๏ Indigenous children ๏ War-affected children๏ Beggars ๏ Institutionalized children ๏ Working children ๏ Married children๏ Child labourers ๏ Mentally ill children๏ Child mothers ๏ Migrant children๏ Child prostitutes ๏ Nomadic children๏ Children born out of wedlock ๏ Orphans๏ Conscripted children ๏ Poor children ๏ Pregnant girls๏ Delinquent children ๏ Refugee children๏ Detained children ๏ Rural children๏ Disabled children ๏ Sans-papiers children๏ Homeless children ๏ Sexually exploited children๏ HIV-infected children ๏ Sold and purchased children ๏ Stateless children
  • 5. Dimensions of Exclusion Poverty: “If we fail to ask why people are poor, we cannot tackle poverty when it results from denials of human rights.” Status markers: see Tomasevski’s list Structural correlates of poverty: Resource-poor schools, poor or non- existent affordable health care & social services, social structures of educational settings such as attitudinal barriers to participation
  • 6. Indicators used to inform inclusive education policies‣ demographics such as geographic area, age- groups, gender, race, economic status‣ culturally, politically, and socially constructed categories of disability‣ funding formulas and policies that may delimit or proscribe overall numbers such as caps on overall numbers, and policies related to revenue and access to services
  • 7. Examples from the United States 40% of revenues allocated to special education are spent on diagnosis and identification. 50% of 6 million children receive special ed services under the label of learning disability. 80% of all children attending public schools could be labeled LD depending on policy definitions. Federal funds are capped at 12% of the total school population, delimiting overall numbers.
  • 8. Key issues: culture, power and vision• We need to ask tough questions about the role of culture and power, and the visions that inform the policies we create which impact children and youth who have historically faced great adversity.
  • 9. Question #2Which inclusive education issues have been, are, or are going to be relevant for educational policies in your country? 9
  • 10. Market-based view of education• a. Schools exist to prepare productive citizens in the global market place.• b. Productive citizens perform well in core subjects of reading, writing, math and science.• c. Performance is best measured by standardized tests that are aligned with grade level expectations set by the nation/state government in the core subjects.• d. All students must achieve the same level of proficiency set by the nation/state government and within a set period of time (per year by grade level).
  • 11. Consequences of market-based view of education ✓pressures to exclude low-performing students ✓increased drop-out rates, retentions, reduced graduation rates ✓ability-tracking ✓migration of qualified teachers to higher performing schools, lack of qualified teachers in low-performing schools, narrowed curriculum ✓standardization of performance leading to education that fails to address individual differences and learning styles ✓emphasis on outcomes that fails to address instructional processes and inputs needed for quality education
  • 12. Examples from the United States Michigan reported more than 1500 failing schools in 2003. Michigan’s response was to redefine AYP by lowering the percentage of students required to pass state exams from 75% to 42%, reducing overnight the number of failing schools from 1500 to 216. Reports from several states indicate that higher numbers of failing schools are reported every year (most in urban areas). Qualified and experienced teachers are migrating out of these schools, creating a fundamental and inequitable lack of opportunity for students to achieve. High drop-out rates of low achievers have been reported. The US has not improved graduation rates for 25 years, and graduation rates are now going down as requirements for an educated workforce are going steeply up. 12
  • 13. Examples: continuedStates graduation rate of 71% for African American students in the class of 2002 dropped to 59.5% in 2003. (Darling-Hammond, 2004: 21)States showing the steepest increases in tests scores have the highest retention and dropout rates. (The “Texas Miracle” was accomplished when a freshman class of 1,000 dwindled to fewer than 300 students by senior year. The miracle is that not one dropout was reported. (Darling-Hammond, 2004: 21)Three times as many 3rd graders and six times as many 6th graders have been classified as in need of special education since accountability policies were put in place (White & Rosenbaum, 2008:102).
  • 14. Important dimensions of inclusiveeducation policy Schools are not equally resourced Children come to school with significant disadvantages of poor health and poverty School improvement is best achieved through systems of reward, not sanctions Tracking and segregation have devastating consequences for children Children and youth have individual differences, talents, and levels of ability
  • 15. Key issue: alternatives tomarket-based education What are the alternatives to market-based assumptions about education? This question forces attention on an even more basic question: What should be the purposes of education in schools? (Education for whom? To what ends?)
  • 16. INCLUSION OF BLIND CHILDREN IN A REGULAR CLASS CARTAGENA SPECIAL CLASSROOM FOR BLINDED CHILDREN IN A REGULAR SCHOOL
  • 17. Question #3• What groups are considered to be most vulnerable to various forms of exclusion from and within education? Who are the excluded groups that current policies have yet to take into account?
  • 18. The most vulnerableIt is predicted that by the year 2025, the number of people withdisabilities will have risen from the current 600 million to 900 millionworldwide, of which 650 million will be in developing countries.Only 1-2 percent of disabled people in countries of the Southexperience equity in terms of basic access to education.The Dakar Framework for Action places a special emphasis on thesechildren as among the most vulnerable, and clearly sets inclusiveeducation as a key strategy to address them. Current policies do nottake these children into account.J. D. Wolfensohn, recent past president of the World Bank, observedthat “addressing disability is a significant part of reducing poverty.”
  • 19. Key issue: turning problems into resources Consider this: If marginalized children are denied educational opportunities, then it is the lack of education, and not their differences that limit their opportunities. This consideration begs the question: What would happen if policy-makers considered these children as resources instead of sources of problems? As investments instead of expenses?
  • 20. Questio n #4• In what ways should current educational reforms address inclusive education?
  • 21. Human Rights ParadigmA rights-based approach within a broadenedhuman-rights paradigm of inclusiveeducation must be adopted that includes 6principles:social protection, accessibility, participatorydecision-making, control/capacity building,consciousness raising, two-wayaccountability. 21
  • 22. Principle #1: Social Protection✓emphasizes not only education rights, but the pre-requisites needed to exercise these rights—adequate health care, family welfare, and basic needs of food and shelter.
  • 23. Principle #2: Accessibility✓concerned with identification and removal of barriers, not only physical, but attitudinal, organizational, and distributive.
  • 24. Inclusive Education Schools have:ACCESSIBLE RAMPS ACCESSIBLE FURNITURE ACCESSIBLE ACCESSIBLE RESOURCES PLAYGROUNDS
  • 25. Principle #3: Participatory Decision-making ✓Inclusive education is a process that recognizes the value and dignity of marginalized children/youth and their inalienable right to self-determination. Decision-making and capacity-building both require the meaningful and active participation of these individuals to effect this principle.
  • 26. Principle #4: Control/Capacity Building✓Under conditions of scarce resources, priorities and values influence capacity. The cost of providing education for people with disabilities is not as costly as the costs to society for failing to provide education. Natural resources and community involvement through coordination and collaboration are sources of support that are largely underutilized and would greatly enhance capacity to provide education for all.
  • 27. Principle #5: Consciousness Raising ✓It is at the point of discrimination that the cycle of poverty and disability can be broken. Negative attitudes inherent in a charity/deficit approach to disability constitute arguably the most significant barriers to equity.
  • 28. Principle #6: Two-way accountability ✓Accountability for outcomes rests not only with students, but with schools. Opportunity to Learn Standards such as measures of teacher quality, access to a relevant and appropriate curriculum, materials and resources should be incorporated in accountability standards.
  • 29. Three types of reformInterface of three types of reform for a comprehensive agenda on social inclusion, social protection and inclusive education:Educational Reform, Diversity Reform, and Social Reform
  • 30. COLOMBIA FEDAREDUCATION BASED ON ARTS “Inclusion at the Inverse”
  • 31. Key issue: comprehensive reform Consider this: Do our fiscal/policy priorities say more about our values and our philosophical commitment to education for marginalized and excluded children than they do about our capacities to provide education? Do conditions of marginalized children at the edge of a society reveal more about the state and progress of a society than conditions at the middle?
  • 32. Voices of Children!“We are not the sources of problems. We are the resources that are needed to solve them. We are not expenses, we are investments. We are the children of the world and despite our different backgrounds we share a common reality. We are united in our struggle to make the world a better place for all.”– Opening address at the UN Special Session on Children, May 2002. Ms. Gabriela Arrieta (Bolivia) and Ms. Audrey Cheynut (Monaco)
  • 33. ConclusionThe ways in which we allocateresources reflect our beliefs about thevalue of education of all children, andparticularly for marginalized children.Our values and priorities say moreabout our commitment to educationthan they do about our capacities toprovide education.
  • 34. Inclusive Education: The Way Forward rights-based approach within a broadened human- Arights paradigm of inclusive education must be adoptedthat includes 6 principles:social protection, accessibility, participatory decision-making, control/capacity building, consciousness raising,two-way accountability.Interface of three types of reform for a comprehensiveagenda on social inclusion, social protection andinclusive education:Educational Reform, Diversity Reform, and SocialReform
  • 35. Study Grounded in Lessons from International Best Practices - Dr. Susan Peters, World Bank Study
  • 36. Book recommended
  • 37. Acknowledgments  Thanks to Richard Pavlak for creating the format for this presentation  Thanks to Laura Oliver for her assistance in collecting data for this report  Thanks to Marisol Moreno for her contributions from Colombia  Thanks to all the children and students who inform and motivate my work 37

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