Demonstrate your impact with the h-index

  • 169 views
Uploaded on

You can also watch a recorded version of this presentation: https://connect.le.ac.uk/p51ud1gxajs/ …

You can also watch a recorded version of this presentation: https://connect.le.ac.uk/p51ud1gxajs/

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
169
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Jorge Hirsch, physics professor at University of California San Diego published a paper in PNAS in 2005. In it he proposed a new way to evaluate the research impact of an individual scientist.The paper seems to have arisen out of disillusionment with the journal impact factor:Hirsch claims he was having getting his controversial work on superconductors accepted in top journals. But they still go t cited and he set out to find an altrnative.By the way, H stands for `highly cited’ not Hirsch
  • Rapidly growing interest
  • Hirsch showed that total citations, N was typically N = 4h2 or h=square root of N/4
  • SIMPLICITYVALIDStudies show strong correlation with peer judgments of reputation, Nobel and other prizes, etc.CREDIBLETypically, a physicist with h=24 will have 2,300 citations. (N=4h2)FLEXIBLEResearch team DepartmentUniversityJournalcountryTopic– the h-index of the h-index is 48 (Scopus). H squared? Slice and dice.You could compare the impact of cardiovascular research in the UK, France and Germany using the h-index.
  • For about 50% of people, h will be the more or less the same (+/- 2_ in both. But there are exceptions. Stephen Hawking (Scopus 19, WoS 59). 5% bigger wos 45% bigger scopus
  • Who has the greater impact?
  • Modelled on real life example of Harry Kroto, Nobel chemistry laureate for discovery of buckminsterfullerenes. Huge lasting impact but on the basis of a small number of papers. You don’t get any extra credit in h for citations > h
  • Let’s look at an example
  • AGECan’t expect a post doc and emeritus to be comparable. Could try m or H-5DISCIPLINEH tends to be bigger in the big sciences (well funded, lots of researchers, big teams) thn in say maths (the opposite usually, plus shorter reference lists)SINGLE NUMBERWouldn’t buy a 5-door car or expect a diagnosis on temperature alone, why different for something as complex as research impact

Transcript

  • 1. www.le.ac.uk/library Demonstrate your impact with the h-index Ian Rowlands University Library Research Festival 2014 Research Bytes 5
  • 2. A new phenomenon
  • 3. A new phenomenon Numbers of published papers on the h-index 6 19 31 63 115 145 173 224 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Papers Source: Scopus July 2013
  • 4. • What is the h-index? • How do I find mine? • Interpreting the h-index
  • 5. What is the h-index? This slide contains an embedded video. Hover your cursor at the bottom of this screen and click play.
  • 6. What is the h-index? • A single number that starts with your first citation and accumulates over your research career • It starts easy but gets progressively harder • Summarises your broad research impact
  • 7. Advantages of the h-index • Simple: easy to generate and easy to understand • Valid: correlates well with career achievements and soft judgments about reputation • Credible: difficult to game • Flexible: any set of papers can have an h-index
  • 8. How do I find mine?
  • 9. How do I find mine? • If you have an IRIS account, go to My Profile
  • 10. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus)
  • 11. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus)
  • 12. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus) Web of Science and Scopus index different journals and may give you different h-indexes. For this reason it is important to always quote your source database, as above.
  • 13. Maximising your IRIS h-index • IRIS calculates your h-index `on the fly’ based on your list of approved publications • If you feel your h-index is too low, make sure that your IRIS profile – includes papers written at other universities – doesn’t have any papers pending approval – is enabled for automatic search in Scopus and Web of Science (in Settings) – has all your name variants and details of previous addresses (better still, use researcher identifiers)
  • 14. If you don’t have an IRIS account … • Find your h-index in Web of Science or Scopus by – running a comprehensive author search – selecting all your publications – running the citation analysis tool • Google Scholar works differently: you need to set up a personal citation profile via your Google account
  • 15. Interpreting the h-index
  • 16. Interpreting the h-index • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 citations per paper • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 citations per paper
  • 17. Interpreting the h-index • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper h-index = 20
  • 18. Interpreting the h-index • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper h-index = 20 h-index = 40!
  • 19. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitations Interpreting the h-index
  • 20. The h-index measures consistency not absolute impact. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitationsforeachpaper Interpreting the h-index
  • 21. The h-index measures consistency not absolute impact. Quite a few Nobel laureates have fair to middling h-indexes. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitationsforeachpaper Interpreting the h-index
  • 22. Some dos • Do take care to check your publication lists for accuracy and completeness: the h-index is not externally audited • Do check out Scopus and Web of Science: you may be falling between the cracks • Do remember that h measures consistency rather than `absolute quality’
  • 23. Some don’ts • Don’t compare your h-index with that of an older or younger colleague • Don’t compare your h-index with someone working in a different field • Don’t put too much emphasis on a single number
  • 24. Useful links • How to find your h-index in Scopus – http://tinyurl.com/h-scopus • How to find your h-index in Web of Science – http://tinyurl.com/h-websci • How to find your h-index in Google Scholar – http://tinyurl.com/h-scholar