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Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
Demonstrate your impact with the h-index
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Demonstrate your impact with the h-index

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You can also watch a recorded version of this presentation: https://connect.le.ac.uk/p51ud1gxajs/ …

You can also watch a recorded version of this presentation: https://connect.le.ac.uk/p51ud1gxajs/

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  • Jorge Hirsch, physics professor at University of California San Diego published a paper in PNAS in 2005. In it he proposed a new way to evaluate the research impact of an individual scientist.The paper seems to have arisen out of disillusionment with the journal impact factor:Hirsch claims he was having getting his controversial work on superconductors accepted in top journals. But they still go t cited and he set out to find an altrnative.By the way, H stands for `highly cited’ not Hirsch
  • Rapidly growing interest
  • Hirsch showed that total citations, N was typically N = 4h2 or h=square root of N/4
  • SIMPLICITYVALIDStudies show strong correlation with peer judgments of reputation, Nobel and other prizes, etc.CREDIBLETypically, a physicist with h=24 will have 2,300 citations. (N=4h2)FLEXIBLEResearch team DepartmentUniversityJournalcountryTopic– the h-index of the h-index is 48 (Scopus). H squared? Slice and dice.You could compare the impact of cardiovascular research in the UK, France and Germany using the h-index.
  • For about 50% of people, h will be the more or less the same (+/- 2_ in both. But there are exceptions. Stephen Hawking (Scopus 19, WoS 59). 5% bigger wos 45% bigger scopus
  • Who has the greater impact?
  • Modelled on real life example of Harry Kroto, Nobel chemistry laureate for discovery of buckminsterfullerenes. Huge lasting impact but on the basis of a small number of papers. You don’t get any extra credit in h for citations > h
  • Let’s look at an example
  • AGECan’t expect a post doc and emeritus to be comparable. Could try m or H-5DISCIPLINEH tends to be bigger in the big sciences (well funded, lots of researchers, big teams) thn in say maths (the opposite usually, plus shorter reference lists)SINGLE NUMBERWouldn’t buy a 5-door car or expect a diagnosis on temperature alone, why different for something as complex as research impact
  • Transcript

    • 1. www.le.ac.uk/library Demonstrate your impact with the h-index Ian Rowlands University Library Research Festival 2014 Research Bytes 5
    • 2. A new phenomenon
    • 3. A new phenomenon Numbers of published papers on the h-index 6 19 31 63 115 145 173 224 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Papers Source: Scopus July 2013
    • 4. • What is the h-index? • How do I find mine? • Interpreting the h-index
    • 5. What is the h-index? This slide contains an embedded video. Hover your cursor at the bottom of this screen and click play.
    • 6. What is the h-index? • A single number that starts with your first citation and accumulates over your research career • It starts easy but gets progressively harder • Summarises your broad research impact
    • 7. Advantages of the h-index • Simple: easy to generate and easy to understand • Valid: correlates well with career achievements and soft judgments about reputation • Credible: difficult to game • Flexible: any set of papers can have an h-index
    • 8. How do I find mine?
    • 9. How do I find mine? • If you have an IRIS account, go to My Profile
    • 10. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus)
    • 11. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus)
    • 12. Professor Michael R Barer Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation All links at Leicester: 176 H-Index: 24 (Web of Science); 26 (Scopus) Web of Science and Scopus index different journals and may give you different h-indexes. For this reason it is important to always quote your source database, as above.
    • 13. Maximising your IRIS h-index • IRIS calculates your h-index `on the fly’ based on your list of approved publications • If you feel your h-index is too low, make sure that your IRIS profile – includes papers written at other universities – doesn’t have any papers pending approval – is enabled for automatic search in Scopus and Web of Science (in Settings) – has all your name variants and details of previous addresses (better still, use researcher identifiers)
    • 14. If you don’t have an IRIS account … • Find your h-index in Web of Science or Scopus by – running a comprehensive author search – selecting all your publications – running the citation analysis tool • Google Scholar works differently: you need to set up a personal citation profile via your Google account
    • 15. Interpreting the h-index
    • 16. Interpreting the h-index • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 citations per paper • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 citations per paper
    • 17. Interpreting the h-index • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper h-index = 20
    • 18. Interpreting the h-index • Harry – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper • Tom – 60 papers – 6,000 citations – 100 mean citations per paper h-index = 20 h-index = 40!
    • 19. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitations Interpreting the h-index
    • 20. The h-index measures consistency not absolute impact. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitationsforeachpaper Interpreting the h-index
    • 21. The h-index measures consistency not absolute impact. Quite a few Nobel laureates have fair to middling h-indexes. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1 11 21 31 41 51 Tom (h=40) Harry (h=20) Rank order of paper Numberofcitationsforeachpaper Interpreting the h-index
    • 22. Some dos • Do take care to check your publication lists for accuracy and completeness: the h-index is not externally audited • Do check out Scopus and Web of Science: you may be falling between the cracks • Do remember that h measures consistency rather than `absolute quality’
    • 23. Some don’ts • Don’t compare your h-index with that of an older or younger colleague • Don’t compare your h-index with someone working in a different field • Don’t put too much emphasis on a single number
    • 24. Useful links • How to find your h-index in Scopus – http://tinyurl.com/h-scopus • How to find your h-index in Web of Science – http://tinyurl.com/h-websci • How to find your h-index in Google Scholar – http://tinyurl.com/h-scholar

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