James Joyce
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James Joyce

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James Joyce James Joyce Presentation Transcript

  • James Joyce
    1882-1941
  • Biography
    Born into new Catholic middle class
    Family’s fortunes on the decline
    Educated in Dublin by the Jesuits
    1902-3 travels to Paris
    1903 Mother dies
    1904, June: Meets future wife, Nora Barnacle
    1904, October: leaves Ireland for the continent
    Trieste, Rome, Zurich, Paris
  • Bio - continued
    A war refugee: fled Paris before German occupation, arrived in Switzerland
    Died on 13 January, 1941, 3 weeks after reaching Switzerland
  • Joyce and Modernism
    Joyce’s name is synonymous with modernist literature.
    His fiction disrupted conventional expectations:
    about narrative certainty, heroism, and religious faith
    declining since the late nineteenth century,
    offering instead a look at human consciousness in a world where grand cultural myths and systems of belief were breaking down.
    Joyce substitutes “epiphany” in place of spiritual conviction and certitude,
    a momentary flash of awareness,
    a heightened personal experience, that revealed the ordinary in an extraordinary light.
    Adapted from Christian doctrine,
    the secular equivalent of a spiritual experience.
    Gabriel Conroy’s realization of his own insignificance,
    illustrate the fleeting intensity of such a moment.
  • Modernist Influences
    World War I (1914-1918)
    Ezra Pound’s challenge: “Make it new”
    The “Great Questioners”: Marx, Nietzsche, Darwin, Freud
    An era of Revolution
    Tsarist Russia becomes the Soviet Union
    Irish “Easter Rising”
    Fragmentation
    Finding Order: myth, art
  • The Dubliners
    “In many ways Joyce invented Dublin, and those of us living there now have to live in it
    according to his myopic lens.”
    - Edward Barrington
    Irish Ambassador to UK
    opening remarks at James Joyce
    Symposium, London, June 24, 2000
  • The Dubliners
    “I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilization in Ireland by preventing the Irish people from having one good look at themselves in my nicely polished looking-glass.”
    “I have written it for the most part in a style of scrupulous meanness.”
  • Dubliners
    A collection of 15 stories, written between 1903 and 1907
    “My intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because that city seemed to me the center of paralysis.”
    “I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin, I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal.”
    “I have tried to present it to the indifferent public under four of its aspects: childhood, adolescence, maturity and public life. The stories are arranged in this order.”
    “I have written it for the most part in a style of scrupulous meanness.”
    “What’s the matter with you is that you’re afraid to live. You and people like you. This city is suffering from hemiplegia [paralysis] of the will.”
  • Narration
    narrative point of view
    first-person, third person
    omniscient, limited
    stream of consciousness, interior monologue
    Transparent Minds:
    psycho-narration
    narrated monologue (indirect interior mon.)
    quoted monologue (direct interior mon.)
  • “The Dead”
    Gabriel
    Insecurity/Awkwardness
    Defensivenessand overcompensation
    Paralysis/“blindness”
    Doesn’t immediately recognize his wife when he sees her on the stairs listening to the song.
    Fear of Insignificance vs. feelings of superiority
    Epiphany:
    The pain of self-awareness
  • Idealization of the Past
    In his toast
    Possible foreshadowing of his wife’s story?
    Wife’s nostalgia at hearing the old song
    He confronts her about it, is rebuffed and again he gets defensive