Experiencing the weaknesses of the articles of confederation
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Experiencing the weaknesses of the articles of confederation Experiencing the weaknesses of the articles of confederation Presentation Transcript

  • Experiencing the Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
  • Weaknesses of the Articles
    How did you feel as you tried to reach an agreement?
    What are the weaknesses of this type of decision-making system? What are the benefits?
    What might be a better way to have the class make a decision?
  • Weaknesses of the Articles
    Congress was composed of 13 states.
    Each state had one vote in Congress.
    The class was divided into 13 groups.
    Each group of students had one vote.
    Articles of Confederation
    Classroom Experience
  • Weaknesses of the Articles
    Congress dealt with many problems, such as how to develop the western lands acquired by the United States in the Treaty of Paris.
    Congress failed to resolve disputes between states over taxes and boundaries.
    Students tried to choose a radio station to listen to.
    The class failed to choose a station to listen to.
    Articles of Confederation
    Classroom Experience
  • Weaknesses of the Articles
    Many citizens were concerned that the government was too weak.
    Some students became dissatisfied and frustrated.
    Articles of Confederation
    Classroom Experience
  • What compromises emerged from the Constitutional Convention?
    What worried James Madison about the future of the United States?
    Why did many members of Congress fear a strong central government?
    What were some of the government’s powers under the Articles of Confederation? What were some of its limitations?
  • Weakness of the Articles of Confederation
    Limited Powers:
    New laws required approval of nine states
    Congress could not regulate trade or set taxes
    No president to enforce the laws
    No courts to settle conflicts between states
    Government did not have the power to resolve conflicts between states
    Congress couldn’t raise money to repay debts from the Revolution
    Other countries took advantage of weak central government
  • Admitting New States
    The Land Ordinance of 1785 set up system for settling the North West Territory
    Territory would be surveyed and divided into townships
    The North West Ordinance provided a way to admit new states
    When a territory has 5,000 free adult males, it can elect its own legislature.
    When the population reaches 60,000, a territory can apply for statehood.
    Settlers have same rights and privileges as other citizens
    Slavery is banned.
  • A Call for Change
    After the Revolution, the nation suffered an economic depression
    Period when business activity slows, prices and wages fall, and unemployment rises
    Farmers Revolt:
    Shay’s Rebellion – organized uprising of Massachusetts farmers, protesting taxes and property seizures
  • Shay’s rebellion
    Congress didn’t have enough gold or silver to mint coins, which caused money shortages
    Farmers had difficulty earning enough to pay their debts and taxes
    Farmers were required to sell their land and livestock to pay their debts.
    Many Americans saw these things as signs that the nation was falling apart.
    Congress called for a convention to revise the Articles of Confederation.
    People like Madison concluded that a nation made up of many groups needs a strong central gvn’t.
    Causes
    Effects
  • The Constitutional Convention
    Experiencing the Drama…
  • The Constitutional Convention
    It’s the summer of 1787 and you are delegates to the Constitutional Convention.
    You have come to Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, but now you have decided to just throw them out and start over.
    Some of you are happy about this change but others are angered by it.
    Quickly find a seat so we can begin the debate…
  • Who am I?
    Read your delegate card very carefully. You are responsible for taking on the persona of your delegate and correctly expressing his views. Your delegate card is super secret to don’t show it to anyone!
    Make a name tag to let us know who you are:
    It should say:
    Your name
    Your state
    A simple picture that represents your delegates personal background and character.
    You have 10 minutes to do this!
  • Introductions
    Introduce yourself to the people in the room.
    Remember to use formal introductions:
    For example, “I am heartily glad to see you , Mr. Madison.” or “It is a pleasure to be in your company, Doctor Franklin.”
    Stay in character the whole time!
    Your delegate card is super secret to don’t show it to anyone!
  • Vow of Secrecy
    I promise not to divulge to the public what is discussed at this convention.
    Close the windows and the door!
  • Preparing for the Debate
    Don’t forget to read your role cards to see what your delegate thinks!
    Meet with others who believe like you do to come up with an argument to support your cause.
    Decide with the other delegates from your state which proposal you will support.
    Read your role card!
    Each state gets one vote and all delegates from that state must agree or the vote doesn’t count.
    Prepare arguments to support your proposal.
    Read the “Points to Raise During the Convention” part of your role card!
  • The Debate: How should states be represented in the new gvn’t?
    Proposals for How States Will Be Represented in the New Government
    Proposal A
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend on the size of the state’s population.
    Proposal B
    Each state will have an equal number of representatives in Congress, regardless of the state’s size.
    Proposal C
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend partially on the wealth of the citizens of the state.
  • Get some info First
    Please read chapter 8, section 5 in the Orange textbook and fill out the 8.5 part of the worksheet.
  • Period 3:
    Please take out your name tag, delegate sheet, and worksheet from yesterday.
    Take 30 seconds to review your worksheet.
  • The Debate: How should states be represented in the new gvn’t?
    Proposals for How States Will Be Represented in the New Government
    Proposal A
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend on the size of the state’s population.
    Proposal B
    Each state will have an equal number of representatives in Congress, regardless of the state’s size.
    Proposal C
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend partially on the wealth of the citizens of the state.
  • Procedure for Discussing the Proposals
    Step 1: One state delegation nominates one of the proposals above.
    Step 2: The nomination is seconded by another state.
    Step 3: The nomination is discussed and debated for three to five minutes.
    Step 4: The nominated proposal is voted upon. To pass, the nomination must be approved by a majority of the states. A majority means that a proposal receives more than half of the votes.
    Step 5: If the proposal does not pass, repeat the process with a new nomination.
  • Period 3:
    Please take out the following things and sit down quickly:
    Core 1 Assessment
    Delegate card and name tag
    8.5 wkst
  • We need a Compromise!
    The delegates must come up with a solution or you will all LOSE 10 points for this activity.
    Let’s take a break from the convention to discuss with each other compromises.
  • The Debate: How should states be represented in the new gvn’t?
    Proposals for How States Will Be Represented in the New Government
    Proposal A
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend on the size of the state’s population.
    Proposal B
    Each state will have an equal number of representatives in Congress, regardless of the state’s size.
    Proposal C
    The number of representatives a state sends to Congress will depend partially on the wealth of the citizens of the state.
  • Procedure for Discussing the Proposals
    Step 1: One state delegation nominates one of the proposals above.
    Step 2: The nomination is seconded by another state.
    Step 3: The nomination is discussed and debated for three to five minutes.
    Step 4: The nominated proposal is voted upon. To pass, the nomination must be approved by a majority of the states. A majority means that a proposal receives more than half of the votes.
    Step 5: If the proposal does not pass, repeat the process with a new nomination.
  • Get some info!
    Please read 8.6 to 8.8 and finish the worksheet.
  • Period 1,2,4,5:
    Please take out the 8.5-8.8 wkst you were working on yesterday.
  • Signing the Constitution
    Check your role card to see if your delegate signed the Constitution.
    If your delegate did not sign, you must be prepared to explain why (check your role card!).
    Can we hear from Dr. Franklin…
    Let’s sign it!
  • Let’s talk about what we’ve done…
    How did it feel to act as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention?
    What was the most challenging part of being a delegate to the Constitutional Convention? What was the most rewarding part?
    What issues did the delegates have to resolve? How did they resolve them?
    Why was it important for the delegates to compromise on certain issues?
    What compromises emerged from the Constitutional Convention?
    In what ways do you think your experience was different from that of the actual delegates? In what ways do you think your experience was similar?