Causes of the Civil War
Invention of the Cotton Gin
♦ When: 1793
♦ Who: Eli Whitney:
♦ Where: South
♦ What: Invention to remove seeds from
cotton
Invention of the Cotton Gin
♦ Effect:
– drastically increased the amount of cotton
being produced, thus drastically increa...
Missouri Compromise
♦ When: 1820
♦ Who: Politicians
♦ Where: New states (Missouri and
Maine)
♦ What: Political compromise ...
Missouri Compromise
♦ Effect:
– Admitted Missouri as slave state, Maine as
free state, prohibited slavery north of
36°30’ ...
Compromise of 1850
♦ When: 1850
♦ Who: Congress
♦ Where: New Lands gained by the Mexican
Cession
♦ What:
– Congressional a...
Compromise of 1850
♦ Effect:
– upset North because it allowed slavery
above old Missouri Compromise line,
basically negati...
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
♦ When: 1852
♦ Who: Written by Harriet Beecher
Stowe, who had never been to the South
♦ Where: North
♦ W...
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
♦ Effect:
– Turned slavery from a political issue to a
moral issue!
– Enraged & disgusted Northerners ab...
Kansas-Nebraska Act
♦ When:1854
♦ Who: Politicians
♦ Where: Kansas-Nebraska territory
♦ What:
– law that repealed Missouri...
Kansas-Nebraska Act
♦ Effect:
– Bloody Kansas
• Violence broke out in Kansas in the late 1850’s
between the pro-slavery an...
Dred Scott Decision
♦ When: 1857
♦ Who: Supreme Court
♦ Where: Illinois
♦ What:
– Supreme Court case that decided slaves d...
Dred Scott Decision
♦ Effect:
– Opened slavery to new territories
– South loved it, but North hated it
– Sectional tension...
Lincoln-Douglas Debates
♦ When: 1858
♦ Who: Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas
♦ Where: Illinois
♦ What:
– Series of deba...
Lincoln-Douglas Debates
♦ Effect:
– Lincoln got Douglas to admit that popular
sovereignty could be used to prevent the
exp...
John Brown’s Raid
♦ When: 1859
♦ Who: John Brown, an abolitionist
♦ Where: Harper’s Ferry, Virginia
♦ What:
– Tried to cap...
John Brown’s Raid
♦ Effect:
– Made a martyr for Union (North) and
abolitionist cause
– Southerners horrified/disgusted by ...
Election of 1860
♦ When: 1860
♦ Who: Lincoln, Douglas, Bell,
Breckinridge
♦ Where: United States
♦ What: Lincoln (viewed b...
Election of 1860
♦ Effect:
– Showed split in the nation over slavery
– Southern states seceded after hearing of
Lincoln’s ...
Sectional Tension
♦ The people in the Northern states
and Southern states became more
and more politically, socially, and
...
Sectional Tension
♦ The cotton gin caused the Southern states to
follow its agricultural ways, while the
Northern states b...
Sectional Tension
♦ Several compromises were attempted by
both sides to try and overcome the
problems between them regardi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Causes of the Civil War Review

2,723 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,723
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
477
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Causes of the Civil War Review

  1. 1. Causes of the Civil War
  2. 2. Invention of the Cotton Gin ♦ When: 1793 ♦ Who: Eli Whitney: ♦ Where: South ♦ What: Invention to remove seeds from cotton
  3. 3. Invention of the Cotton Gin ♦ Effect: – drastically increased the amount of cotton being produced, thus drastically increasing the number of slaves needed to harvest the cotton. – This increased the tensions that slavery caused.
  4. 4. Missouri Compromise ♦ When: 1820 ♦ Who: Politicians ♦ Where: New states (Missouri and Maine) ♦ What: Political compromise made in 1820 between Northern and Southern politicians
  5. 5. Missouri Compromise ♦ Effect: – Admitted Missouri as slave state, Maine as free state, prohibited slavery north of 36°30’ parallel (Missouri Compromise Line) – Kept power in Senate equal
  6. 6. Compromise of 1850 ♦ When: 1850 ♦ Who: Congress ♦ Where: New Lands gained by the Mexican Cession ♦ What: – Congressional agreement on slavery: • admitted California as a free state • did not restrict slavery in New Mexico or Utah (popular sovereignty ) • Bans slave trade in Washington, D.C. • passed a stricter fugitive slave law, which said that all persons must help to catch fugitive slaves
  7. 7. Compromise of 1850 ♦ Effect: – upset North because it allowed slavery above old Missouri Compromise line, basically negating the Missouri Compromise – Southerners loved it for the same reason – Did not solve slavery issue – Caused sectional tensions
  8. 8. Uncle Tom’s Cabin ♦ When: 1852 ♦ Who: Written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, who had never been to the South ♦ Where: North ♦ What: Fictional book about slavery in South
  9. 9. Uncle Tom’s Cabin ♦ Effect: – Turned slavery from a political issue to a moral issue! – Enraged & disgusted Northerners about slavery & the South – Enraged Southerners who felt it was an unfair description of slavery – Caused sectional tensions to heat up even more
  10. 10. Kansas-Nebraska Act ♦ When:1854 ♦ Who: Politicians ♦ Where: Kansas-Nebraska territory ♦ What: – law that repealed Missouri Compromise – split the Nebraska territory into 2 separate territories, Kansas and Nebraska – declared issue of slavery in Kansas and Nebraska territories would be left to residents (popular sovereignty)
  11. 11. Kansas-Nebraska Act ♦ Effect: – Bloody Kansas • Violence broke out in Kansas in the late 1850’s between the pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions • Eventually 2 separate gvn’ts were elected in Kansas, one pro, one con of slavery – It was a warm-up exercise for the coming Civil War
  12. 12. Dred Scott Decision ♦ When: 1857 ♦ Who: Supreme Court ♦ Where: Illinois ♦ What: – Supreme Court case that decided slaves did not have the rights of citizens – Ruled Congress could not forbid slavery in the territories, making Missouri Compromise unconstitutional
  13. 13. Dred Scott Decision ♦ Effect: – Opened slavery to new territories – South loved it, but North hated it – Sectional tensions escalated.
  14. 14. Lincoln-Douglas Debates ♦ When: 1858 ♦ Who: Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas ♦ Where: Illinois ♦ What: – Series of debates between Stephen Douglas & Abraham Lincoln during 1858 senatorial election campaign – Focused on issue of slavery
  15. 15. Lincoln-Douglas Debates ♦ Effect: – Lincoln got Douglas to admit that popular sovereignty could be used to prevent the expansion of slavery into territories, which lost Douglas the support of the South – South became aware of Lincoln’s views.
  16. 16. John Brown’s Raid ♦ When: 1859 ♦ Who: John Brown, an abolitionist ♦ Where: Harper’s Ferry, Virginia ♦ What: – Tried to capture arsenal at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, and begin slave revolt – Was captured and hung
  17. 17. John Brown’s Raid ♦ Effect: – Made a martyr for Union (North) and abolitionist cause – Southerners horrified/disgusted by North’s outright support of Brown’s actions – sectional tension intensified
  18. 18. Election of 1860 ♦ When: 1860 ♦ Who: Lincoln, Douglas, Bell, Breckinridge ♦ Where: United States ♦ What: Lincoln (viewed by the South as an abolitionist) was elected president
  19. 19. Election of 1860 ♦ Effect: – Showed split in the nation over slavery – Southern states seceded after hearing of Lincoln’s win – Feared they would lose slavery under his rule – Caused North to take military measures to keep Union together – Set stage for Fort Sumter attack and start of war.
  20. 20. Sectional Tension ♦ The people in the Northern states and Southern states became more and more politically, socially, and economically divided.
  21. 21. Sectional Tension ♦ The cotton gin caused the Southern states to follow its agricultural ways, while the Northern states became more industrialized (they could not grow cotton in the North - too cold) ♦ Northern and Southern states found it increasingly difficult to relate to one another, especially when it came to the topic of slavery ♦ They began to see themselves as separate “sections” of the nation - sections which had very little in common
  22. 22. Sectional Tension ♦ Several compromises were attempted by both sides to try and overcome the problems between them regarding the slavery issue ♦ All compromises eventually failed ♦ The result would be the build-up of sectional tensions which would eventually lead to war

×