102609 Gov Team Elections 50m

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102609 Gov Team Elections 50m

  1. 1. Welcome Gov Team, boot up, lids down. Date: 10/30/09 , Topic: Elections Think of items to discuss. Announcements: Intro Music:
  2. 2. Gov Team Agenda 1) Elections Unit To Dos 1) Come up with possible follow up questions and your possible responses in your unit meetings. Acquire index cards +a place to put them Reminder 1) Sign up for role meetings online.
  3. 3. Listen baby Ain't no mountain high Ain't no valley low Ain't no river wide enough, baby If you need me, call me No matter where you are No matter how far Don’t worry baby Just call out my name I'll be there in a hurry You don't have to worry There ain't no mountain high enough Ain't no valley low enough Ain't no river wide enough To keep me from getting to you, baby Remember the day I set you free I told you You could always count on me darlin And from that day on I made a vow I'll be there when you want me Some way, some how Cause baby There ain't no mountain high enough Ain't no valley low enough Ain't no river wide enough To keep me from getting to you, baby
  4. 4. Followup Process A - Answer : Quick answer to their question S - Story : Background on the issue A - Analysis : Detailed answer to their question (including other POVs) P - Proposal : Recommendation on what should be done (All responses need to be short and spoken slowly. Try to get 3 people on a question, but never all 5).
  5. 5. Unit Intensives : We win, and lose together. Each blue choose 1 person to target Up (at the table): Unit Judging (at the judging table): Unit Question List (reg seats): Unit Com List (reg seats): Unit Research Sheet (reg seats): Unit Debrief (outside): Unit
  6. 6. Unit Hearings : Working together, we win. Speech = 4 minutes, Followup= 8 minutes Presenters (Targets): 1) Present your speech and answer followups . 2) Take notes on feedback from the coaches. Coaches (Everyone Else): 1) Records feedback to give at the end. 2) Ask the group follow up questions . Extra Roles 1) 1 person to read the question before they start 2) 1 person keeps time
  7. 7. Mr. Chiang’s 7 Speech Tips 1) 3 Part: Opening > Argument > Closing 2) Think of your audience and use local examples 3) Stories are remembered 4) Cite authoritative evidence 5) Call audience to action 6) Repetition, pauses, tone 7) Speak slowly and make eye contact (you make like looking over heads) Last, the majority of speech is body language, not words.
  8. 8. Flash Debate <<<<<<<<<<<<<< ONE-PRO <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< A B >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FIVE-CON >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  9. 9. Each side has 4-5 debaters and 2 filters . Everyone fills out papers when they have ideas, and pass them to filters. Filters pass papers to debaters . Debate Format 60 seconds – Talk to Team 60 seconds – Opener Pro Side 60 seconds – Opener Con Side 60 seconds – Rebuttal Pro Side 60 seconds – Rebuttal Con Side 1 2 3 4 5 PRO CON
  10. 10. BOOK SHELVES CHIANG’S DESK 1 5 4 6 10 28 37 PURPLE: FILTERS TV 7 38 SIDE WHITE BOARD DOOR 12 9 11 25 2 19 24 20 21 26 33 3 29 34 22 36 27 31 32 30 35 23 18 17 YELLOW: DEBATERS M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F FILE CABINETS NOTES: 14 13 15 16 M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F M T W T F 8 M T W T F LCD 38 M T W T F 26 M T W T F 5 M T W T F
  11. 11. Review 1) Democratic Party : DEM, Liberal, Left, Donkey, Blue, 36% 2) Republican Party : GOP, Conservative, Right, Elephant, Red, 24% How to Join : Check box on voter registration form 3) Independents : DTS, don’t pick any party, 40% 4) Political Socialization : The strongest to weakest influences on your politics: a) Family b) Friends c) Orgs/Church d) Class (research is conflicted on if school does anything) Once socialized, you easily accept news that fit your view, and easily reject news that doesn’t.
  12. 14. 2008: GOP/McCain: 46% DEM/Obama: 53%
  13. 15. 2008: GOP/McCain: 46% DEM/Obama: 53%
  14. 16. 2008: GOP/McCain: 46% DEM/Obama: 53%
  15. 17. Pew Research March 20, 2008
  16. 18. Pew Research March 20, 2008
  17. 19. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 1) Impact of Age : Ppl tend to start liberal, and get more conservative. Young Vote 49%, Sr Vote: 70% 2) Impact of Gender : Slightly more liberal Women Vote More 3% Oten DEM 56% GOP 43% 3) Impact Race : White Vote: DEM 43% GOP 55% Black Vote : DEM 95% GOP 4% (vote 60%) Latino Vote : DEM 67% GOP 31% (vote 47%) Asian Vote : DEM 62% GOP 35% (least vote 44%) 4) Impact of Income : Poor more liberal, vote less 5) Impact of Religion : Religious more conservative (except Jewish more liberal) 6) Impact of Education : Uneducated and PhD more liberal. BA/BS educated conservative.
  18. 20. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 1) Impact of Age : Ppl tend to start liberal, and get more conservative. Young Vote 49%, Sr Vote: 70%
  19. 22. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 2) Impact of Gender : Slightly more liberal Women Vote More 3% Often DEM 56% GOP 43%
  20. 23. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 3) Impact Race : White Vote: DEM 43% GOP 55% Black Vote : DEM 95% GOP 4% (vote 60%) Latino Vote : DEM 67% GOP 31% (vote 47%) Asian Vote : DEM 62% GOP 35% (least vote 44%)
  21. 24. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 4) Impact of Income : Poor more liberal, vote less
  22. 25. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 5) Impact of Religion : Religious more conservative (except Jewish more liberal)
  23. 26. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 6) Impact of Education : Uneducated and PhD more liberal. BA/BS educated conservative.
  24. 27. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 7) Impact of Media : Media not effective at changing views, but very effective and amplifying views we already hold
  25. 28. Follow Up Q: Cable news seems to polarize as much as it informs its viewers, how do we prevent this?
  26. 29. Notes #25a , Title: “ Public Opinion Notes ” 8) Crisis : Ppl tend to support gov during crisis
  27. 31. Notes #25a , Title: “ Polling Notes ” 9) Polling : Statistical method to get info on a larger group by asking a random sample of it. a) Develop a list of ALL the people in your target population b) Number those on that list 1-X c) Randomly pick ( www.randomizer.org ) the numbers you wish to sample (bigger sample = more accurate) d) Contact everyone randomly selected Exit Poll: Ask random voters as they leave voting plc Focus Group: Small group questioned in-depth Straw Poll: Non-random, not accurate ( often online ) Census: Ask everyone, 100% accurate ( each 10 yrs )
  28. 33. 9) Polling : Statistical method to get info on a larger group by asking a random sample of it. a) Develop a list of ALL the people in your target population b) Number those on that list 1-X c) Randomly pick ( www.randomizer.org ) the numbers you wish to sample (bigger sample = more accurate) d) Contact everyone randomly selected Title “ Poll MV ” 1) Create a Google Form 2) Contact the people assigned to you
  29. 34. Polling < Exit Poll Focus Group Straw Poll Census
  30. 35. Polling Exit Poll < Focus Group Straw Poll Census
  31. 36. Polling Exit Poll Focus Group < Straw Poll Census
  32. 37. Polling Exit Poll Focus Group Straw Poll < Census
  33. 38. Polling Exit Poll Focus Group Straw Poll Census <
  34. 39. 10) Polling Reliability: 4% error means results can be 4+ or 4-. Error rate depends on sample size and how many of the sample group were successfully reached and if questions’ wording was unbiased. Example: 9/22 Fox Poll: Obama: 47% Is Really: 43-51% McCain: 43% Is Really: 39-47% Halo Effect: Ppl say what sounds good ( Bradley Effect: Minorities poll higher than what the outcome is in the real vote )
  35. 40. Follow Up Q: Assuming a poll is accurate, should politicians make decisions based on polls?
  36. 41. Title “ Wording of Questions ” Polls are only as accurate as their questions. A good poll tries to be neutral in wording. A PUSH POLL is purposely bias, because is an ad acting as a poll . 1) Work with your unit, write a unbiased poll question to gauge support for President Obama. 2) Work with your unit, write a biased poll question to gauge his support. 3) Write a push poll question that plants negative information trying to hurt Obama.
  37. 44. Project Title “ National Polls ” 1) Work with your unit, pick a campaign : Obama or McCain , look over the Ohio polls , and write what the campaign’s policy theme that would appeal to Ohioans (write partner’s name) . 2) Look over the 2004 exit polls , and determine: Assuming…. Bush=McCain Kerry=Obama a) Who for sure will back you b) Who might back you if you work for it c) Who will never back you 3) Research Ohio and its culture and create for the community slides: i) A bullet slide of their Ohio strategy/message ii) A print campaign ad http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/pages/results/states/OH/P/00/epolls.0.html
  38. 45. “ Polls Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Assuming polls are accurate, leaders should still ignore them 1) US is a republic, we elect representatives to run the country 2) The best leader is someone who leads her ppl to a better place PRO: Assuming polls are accurate, leaders should follow them 1) US is a democracy, so the leaders should follow the ppl’s wishes 2) The best leader is someone who puts the needs of the ppl first
  39. 46. Notes #26a , Title: “ SIG Notes ” 1) Special Interest Groups (SIG) : Any group/faction of ppl promoting an issue/view Most numerous are business SIGs . 2) Powers of SIGS : a) Expertise on their topic is most persuasive b) More free to raise/spend/donate money c) Focus one 1 issue d) More free to do bad things (voters don’t punish) 3) Political Action Committee (PAC) : Any SIG that donates money directly to candidates must form a committee in the SIG that is fed. regulated . 4) Non-Profit Organization (527) : Any SIG can raise/spend unregulated money to attack a candidate (or issue) under policy speech as long as it doesn’t support/coordinate with campaigns
  40. 47. Notes #26a , Title: “ SIG Notes ” 1) Special Interest Groups (SIG) : Any group/faction of ppl promoting an issue/view Most numerous are business SIGs . 2) Powers of SIGs : a) Expertise on their topic is most persuasive b) More free to raise/spend/donate money c) Focus one 1 issue d) More free to do bad things (voters don’t punish)
  41. 48. SIG MATH: If Milk Farming SIG convinced Congress to pass $1 tax , you lose $1 to help milk farms 150 mil tax payers (50% of US) SIG gets $150 million . How hard will you fight to not loose $1? How hard will SIG fight to gain $150 million? PACs can give MAX $5000 to each member of Congress, that’s $2.7 million total, still a profit of $147.3 million .
  42. 49. “ Interest Group Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: SIGs 1) Everyone has the right to pool their power and create a counter SIG 2) SIG often ask for things that they really need gov help with, and that may benefit everyone like farm help PRO: Ban SIGs 1) SIGs place selfish interest over the community’s interests 2) SIG lead to govt spending that waste tax payer money. Unfair to work hard to earn money to just hand over to SIGs.
  43. 50. 3) Political Action Committee (PAC) : Any SIG that donates money directly to candidates must form a committee in the SIG that is fed. regulated . 4) Non-Profit Organization (527) : Any SIG can raise/spend unregulated money to attack a candidate (or issue) under policy speech as long as it doesn’t support/coordinate with campaigns
  44. 51. 5) Non-Political SIG Does nothing (Octagon) PAC Donates directly to candidate, federally regulated (NRA) Tax Deductible Political (527) Raises + spends money on their own to promote policy or attack candidates (Swift Boat Vets) Non-Tax Deductible Political Raises and spends money to more openly support a candidate (Fireman)
  45. 57. Follow Up Q: If it’s rich people and businesses will want to influence politics no matter what, is it better to have them donate large amounts of money to candidates or to 527s?
  46. 58. Both activities are protected under 1 st A, just some more than others. Club (sig) PAC (regulated) Candidates 527 (unregulated) Spend On Their Own
  47. 59. “ 527 Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: SIG camp spending should NOT be regulated 1) It’s in the better interest to make sure the free speech means free speech, even if unpopula 2) Every person/group has the right to be political active (w money) PRO: SIG camp. spending should be regulated 1) It’s in the better interest of the country to make sure voters aren’t being fooled 2) Not being regulated means more pol activity is happening on the fringes
  48. 60. Follow Up Q: How do we balance allowing for the freedom of expression (money and advocacy) of special interest groups AND still have a country that operates for the good of everyone?
  49. 61. Notes #29a , Title: “ Political Parties Notes ” 1) Political Party Structure : Club>County>State>Nat a) Be Member: Fill voter reg form to be member b) Be Party Leader: Elected by active party members 2) Party Limits : a) Candidates may not follow party ideas b) Party activities fed. regulated 3) Reasons for Creating a Party : a) Ideology (Libertarian Party) b) Specific Issue (Pot Party) c) Protest/Dissatisfaction (Reform Party) 4) 3 rd Parties Hardships : a) Only 1 candidate wins, win outright or no prize b) Less media coverage + voter respect c) GOP and/or DEM can adopt /steal your platform d) Ballot access and public funding (you need certain % of past votes to get either)
  50. 62. Notes #29a , Title: “ Political Parties Notes ” 1) Political Party Structure : Club>County>State>Nat a) Be Member: Fill voter reg form to be member b) Be Party Leader: Elected by active party members 2) Party Limits : a) Candidates may not follow party ideas b) Party activities fed. regulated
  51. 63. “ Party Loyalty Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Politicians should defy parties 1) Politicians should be loyal to voters not parties 2) Being loyal to parties just creates more partisanship and petty competition PRO: Politicians should be loyal to party 1) No victory can be gained by 1 vote alone, party loyalty enhances all party member’s power 2) If your party isn’t unified, and the other party is, you’ll suffer
  52. 64. 3) Reasons for Creating a Party : a) Ideology (Libertarian Party) b) Specific Issue (Pot Party) c) Protest/Dissatisfaction (Reform Party) 4) 3 rd Parties Hardships : a) Only 1 candidate wins, win outright or no prize b) Less media coverage + voter respect c) GOP and/or DEM can adopt /steal your platform d) Ballot access and public funding (you need certain % of past votes to get either)
  53. 65. 5) Non-Partisan : Most city council and school board races are non-partisan ( party not listed on ballot )
  54. 67. Bush: 48%, Gore: 48%, Nader: 3%
  55. 68. “ Third Parties Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Third party is a equally worthy vote 1) All parties were once 3 rd parties id. DEM/GOP 2) If people only voted for who they think will win, and not for who they think is best, our democracy is in trouble PRO: Third party is a wasted vote 1) Most the time, only the GOP or DEM can win, so a vote for 3 rd is a vote for the other side 2) With winner takes all, voting for the loser means your vote doesn’t matter
  56. 69. Green Party : More gov action on environ, peace, poverty (success in SF local elections) Libertarian Party : Social and economic freedom from gov Joyce Chen (Green) Jessie Ventura (Reform) New Haven Alderman Minnesota Governor http://www.politics1.com/parties.htm
  57. 70. Review 1) Creating a Party : Anyone can create a new political party. Party is a club that runs for office. As a private club, parties can set their own rules . 2) How to become a party member : Check box on your voter reg form. Party leaders are chosen by active members or those who give a lot of money .
  58. 71. Notes #36a “ Campaign Strategy ” 1) Win a Election Checklist: 1) Announce Candidacy ( File Papers with Reg of Voters + Send Press Release ) 2) Visibility ( Campaign Signs + Mailers/Flyers + Media: Paid Ads, Web/Facebook, Letters to Editor ) 3) Find Volunteers ( Online, Special Interest Groups ) 4) Buy Master Voter List, then Tuning List ( voter list show party registration + # times voted ) 5) Phonebank to Find Out Who Supports You , Undecided , Won’t Support You ( Tuning Voter List ) 6) Until Election Day: Phonebank to Persuade Undecided and Register New Voters (that are supporters) 7) On Election Day: Get Out the Vote (GOTV) your supporters (those on your voter list who support you). Ignore the rest.
  59. 74. 2) Microtarget : Money + Time of Volunteers are Scarce ( copy chart ) Increasing vote by mail means microtarget must start earlier.
  60. 75. 3 ) Info Shortcuts : Short on time, voters rely on cues from campaigns and trust ppl to make decisions
  61. 76. 4 ) Negative Ads : Neg reduces voter turnout , but works to hurt target. Too neg can backfire if ad sponsored by candidate. 1 st Am protects SIGS ( 527s ) write to launch neg ads with little conseq .
  62. 77. Follow Up Q: Do negative ads hurt democracy or help democracy by providing valuable information for voters?
  63. 78. Work #35a , “ Negative Attacks Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Negative ads are bad for democracy 1) Negative ads don’t inform, they obfuscate (which means they mislead) 2) Negative ads reduce voter turn out and increase gov cynicism PRO: Negative ads are good for democracy 1) Voters don’t have time to research candidates, so we need their opponents to present this 2) This makes sure candidates are tough enough to do the job
  64. 79. Notes #30a , Title: “ Primary Notes ” 1) Primaries : Voters help chose party’s nominee (parties don’t have to have prim.) 2) Delegates : Delegates are a “middle man” in primary process, voters choose del > del. choose nominee ( del. are politicians + active party ppl ) 3) Primaries in 4 Steps (Jan-June) : a) Each party chooses dates to hold primary elections + decides how many delegates each state gets b) After each election, most state’s have delegates awarded proportional to the results . c) Delegates go to party convention to vote d) Who ever gets >50% del. vote is nominee
  65. 80. Notes #30a , Title: “ Primary Notes ” 1) Primaries : Voters help choose party’s nominee (parties don’t have to have prim.)
  66. 81. Notes #30a , Title: “ Primary Notes ” 2) Delegates : Delegates are a “middle man” in primary process, voters choose del > del. choose nominee ( del. are politicians + active party ppl )
  67. 82. 3) Primaries in 4 Steps (Jan-June) : a) Each party chooses dates to hold primary elections + decides how many delegates each state gets b) After each election, most state’s have delegates awarded proportional to the results . c) Delegates go to party convention to vote (Aug) d) Who ever gets >50% del. vote is nominee
  68. 83. Primary Flow Chart Primary Elections (Jan-Jun) Voters Vote Based on Voter Results, Delegates Pledged to Candidates Delegates go to Convention (Aug), 50%+ is winner. Dem: 20% of del. Are super del, pledged to no one. Focus most energy on first 2: IA, NH (Jan) Gen elec in Nov
  69. 84. Proportional Counting: Unlike the general election, in most states primaries, delegates are given out based on proportion of the results. Example: CA: 400* Delegates Clinton 75% = 300 CA delegates Obama 25% = 100 CA delegates So you can loose the majority, and still get delegates. So it really makes no difference if you get 49% or 51% in a primary.
  70. 85. California's Proportional System: DEM: 441 Delegates 1) Each congressional district (CD) gets 3-7 delegates based on voter turnout. 2) Each CD’s delegates decided proportionally (under 15% get none) GOP: 173 Delegates 1) Each congressional district (CD) gets 3 delegates. 2) Who wins that CD wins all 3 votes. Democrats also have something called super delegates. Powerful members of the democratic party are automatically delegates
  71. 87. 1800s , there were no primaries. Party leaders chose their nominees.
  72. 88. 1900s , Party creates primaries to provide the people a say in the nominations.
  73. 89. When more than one person from a party wants to run, a primary election is held. If not, NO primary.
  74. 90. Lose primary, can always run 3 rd Party
  75. 91. 4) Iowa and New Hampshire (Jan) : Earliest by tradition, give low budget candidates more chance since states are so small (CA: Feb). Other states race to be early. 5) Two Kinds of Primaries: a) Primary : People just vote, no debating. a) Pick up ballot b) Drop off ballot c) Count Most common form (CA) b) Caucus : People debate before voting. a) Pick a corner. b) Debate c) Count Less voters, more party activists vote (IA)
  76. 92. 4) Iowa and New Hampshire (Jan) : Earliest by tradition, give low budget candidates more chance since states are so small (CA: Feb). Other states race to be early.
  77. 93. February 5, 2008, after Iowa and NH
  78. 95. 5) Two Kinds of Primaries: a) Primary : People just vote, no debating. a) Pick up ballot b) Drop off ballot c) Count Most common form (CA)
  79. 96. 5) Two Kinds of Primaries: b) Caucus : People debate before voting. a) Pick a corner. b) Debate c) Count Less voters, more party activists vote (IA)
  80. 97. Caucus : People debate before voting. 1) Pick a corner 2) Debate 3) Count
  81. 98. Primary : People just vote, no debating. 1) Pick up ballot 2) Drop off ballot 3) Count
  82. 99. Iowa Caucus (Jan 3): 50* delegates Caucus people debate in a townhall before voting. New Hampshire Primary (Jan 8): 20* delegates Primary people vote without talking. Together, less than 1% of the population.
  83. 100. “ Primary Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Big State/All State 1) Big states deserve more say 2) It’s chaos if everyone races to be after NH/IA 3) Iowa and New Hampshire don’t reflect a lot of America PRO: Small States 1 st 1) Small states take it seriously 2) Small states are cheap allow more to try to run 3) Iowa and New Hampshire are the heart of America
  84. 101. “ Strategy Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: McCain – Spend All on First 2 1) Focus on IA and NH 2) No one has ever won nomination without winning those two. PRO: Giuliani – All States 1) Run a national campaign to build 2) By focusing in bigger states early, you are getting bigger prizes (states with more del), IA + NW is only 1%
  85. 102. Notes #32a , Title: “ Primary Notes ” 1) Primary Elections (Jan-Jun) Voters Vote Based on Voter Results, Delegated Pledged to Candidates Delegates go to Convention (Aug), 50%+ is winner. Dem: 20% of del. Are super del, pledged to no one. Focus most energy on first 2: IA, NH (Jan) Gen elec in Nov
  86. 103. 2) Party Convention (Aug): Who ever gets a majority (>50%) delegates wins . DEM: 2000 /4000* GOP 1000 /2000*
  87. 104. 3) Contested Convention (Aug) If no one can get to the 50% on first vote, then delegates are released to vote however they want .
  88. 105. 4) Primary Voters : Primaries draw more extreme party members , candidates start extreme, and go moderate during gen elec
  89. 106. February 5, 2008, after Iowa and NH
  90. 107. Project Title “ Primary Campaign ” 1) Research your assigned candidate AND study the state assigned you. Cand: 1 -McCain, 2 -Romney, 3 -Paul, 4 -Biden, 5 -Clinton, 6 -Obama Order: 1-3 -IA (C), 4-6 -NH 2) Create Google slides on your state strategy: i) Docs bullet slide of their state strategy ii) A print campaign ad, post in Docs 3) Prepare one person to go debate.
  91. 108. Notes #33a , Title: “ Primary Notes ” 1) Who can vote in the primary? 1) Closed Ballot : Only registered party members can vote. 2) Open Ballot : Any registered voter can request ONE primary ballot 3) CA : DEM open to DTS if they request DEM ballot, GOP closed, only GOP. 4) Open Primary : Just 1 primary, any voter can vote, regardless of party, top 2 move to general election regardless of party ( on June ballot )
  92. 109. “ Open Primary Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Keep Closed Prim 1) Party’s are semi-private and should be allowed to control the process 2) Open prim means more contested general election (more expensive)=more corrupt PRO: Open Primary 1) Most voters are DTS (decline to state) 2) Allows minority (in Cup., the GOP) to influence election by voting for a moderate DEM, open prim moderates politics
  93. 110. February 5, 2008, after Iowa and NH
  94. 111. Review: Primary Elections (Jan-Jun) Voters Vote Based on Voter Results, Delegated Pledged to Candidates Delegates go to Convention (Aug), 50%+ is winner. Dem: 20% of del. Are super del, pledged to no one. Focus most energy on first 2: IA, NH (Jan) Gen elec in Nov
  95. 112. Notes #34a , Title: “ General Election Notes ” 1) General Election (Nov) : Primary winner from each party (including 3 rd parties) fight. Ppl Vote > Electoral College Votes > Winner 2) Electoral College (EC) (Dec) : Constitutionally created a safety check. Each state legislatures picks ppl to be electors (538). EC electors pledge to vote how state’s voters voted. 3) EC Representation : Each state gets # of electors equal to # US Senators (2) + # of US House members (53) . Total: 100+435+3 for DC=538 4) General Election is Winner Takes All (270): Unlike primaries, general elec is winner takes all . If someone wins plurality (more than others) of the voters, they get ALL that state’s electoral votes .
  96. 113. Notes #34a , Title: “ General Election Notes ” 1) General Election (Nov) : Primary winner from each party (including 3 rd parties) fight. Ppl Vote > Electoral College Votes > Winner
  97. 114. Notes #34a , Title: “ General Election Notes ” 2) Electoral College (EC) (Dec) : Constitutionally created a safety check. Each state legislatures picks ppl to be electors (538). EC electors pledge to vote how state’s voters voted.
  98. 115. Notes #34a , Title: “ General Election Notes ” 3) EC Representation : Each state gets # of electors equal to # US Senators (2) + # of US House members (53) . Total: 100+435+3 for DC=538
  99. 116. House: 435 Senate: 100 DC: 3 435+100+3=538 http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/calculator/
  100. 117. Notes #34a , Title: “ General Election Notes ” 4) General Election is Winner Takes All (270): Unlike primaries, general elec is winner takes all . If someone wins plurality (more than others) of the voters, they get ALL that state’s electoral votes .
  101. 119. 5) Electoral College Numbers: House (435)+ Senate (100)+DC (3)=538 . Over 50% to win the EC. 538/2=269. 269+1=270. So 270/538 to win .
  102. 120. House: 435 Senate: 100 DC: 3 435+100+3=538 538/2=269=50%, 270/538=50.1% http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/calculator/
  103. 125. Barbara Lett-Simmons (2000)
  104. 127. POPULATION EC US 296,410,404 538 California 36,553,215 55 Texas 23,904,380 34 New York 19,297,729 31 North Dakota 639,715 3 Vermont 621,254 3 Wyoming 522,830 3
  105. 128. “ Electoral College Debate ” 1) Read the 2 sides, choose 1 side, and write which you choose and explain why . 2) Then write down what your partner thinks ( include their name at the end ). 1 2 3 4 5 CON: Ditch the EC 1) EC makes candidates ignore really liberal or conservative states 2) CA, biggest state totally ignored, give each voter equal voice 3) It’s confusing PRO: Keep the EC 1) Its worked so far (kinda) 2) Small states get at least 3 EC, they need an amplified voice 3) One day we might need the safety check
  106. 129. Project Title: “ EC Strategy ” 1) Read the 00-04 chart at PbWorks with a unit and create 3 list ( Impossible, Loyal , and Swing based on % ), continue to list until you get to 270 in your Loyal and Swing for either McCain or Obama. Everyone must create a spreadsheet! http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/calculator/
  107. 130. Kerry: 252, Bush: 286, Ohio: 20
  108. 132. “ Debate Prep ” 1) List the techniques mentioned by TJ Walker. Practice each technique with your partner from your unit .
  109. 133. Project Title: “ Unit Debates ” Unit 1 v 2 : Leadership Unit 3 v 4 : Foreign Policy Unit 5 v 6 : Economy Prepare to have your units debate each other on this topic. Wager: ?
  110. 134. Notes #38a , Title: “ Congressional Elections Notes ” 1) Incumbency Rate : Rate that person in office is reelected, incumbents raise more money+name ID 2) House Races (Every 2 Years) : Avg Cost: 1 Million. Incumbency Rate: 98% ( rely more on PAC ) 3) Senate Races (Every 6 Years) : Avg Cost: 3-6 Million. Incumbency Rate: 88% 4) Midterm Elections: H+S races happen each presidential election, but also each even yr between pres. election, your vote for congress (and state/local candidates) matters! The last Cupertino City Council race and school measure passed with less than 400 votes! One day CA may become a contested swing state, especially if a CA politician runs for president.
  111. 137. Annually… $120 Billion for Medicine for Seniors If spend on college students…. Given there are 12 Million College Students $10,000 Tuition Credit For Every Student Local Tuition UC $8,000 (leaving $2,000 for books, misc) CSU $3,800 (leaving $6,200 for books, misc) Top Cooking School (CIA) $11,000 (many much cheaper) Top Mechanic School (UTI) $15,000 (many much cheaper)
  112. 138. HOW CAN GOVT NOT HAVE MORE IMPACT THAN THAT? NOT TO MENTION THE GOV… TAKES 1/4-1/3 OF YOUR PAYCHECK GOV DECIDES HOW YOUR CREDIT CARDS, CELL PHONE CONTRACTS, & LOANS WORK YOUNG PPL MAKE UP OUR MILITARY GOV FUNDS OR NOT FUNDS ALT. ENERGY AND MEDICAL RESEARCH GOV DECIDES WHAT’S LEGAL OR ILLEGAL GOV CAN REGULATE WHAT YOU CONSUME, WHO YOU CAN BE WITH, WHAT YOU CAN DO
  113. 139. You don’t vote because politicians don’t respond to you. Politicians don’t respond to you because you don’t vote. So your generation needs to vote! Adults like all human beings worry about themselves, we need you to stand up for your future, which is well being of America’s future.

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