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LIS531M: Cataloging Microforms & Manuscripts

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  • 1. Describing Microforms & Manuscripts Joshua Parker & Alison Thornton 1 May 2007 Simmons College, Graduate School of Library & Information Science LIS 531M  Descriptive Cataloging & Metadata  Dr. Daniel Joudrey
  • 2. Describing Microforms
  • 3. Describing Microforms: What is Being Described?  Microform: A microphotographic manifestation of a work. Specific forms include: microfiche, microopaque, microfilm, and aperture cards  AACR2 1.5A3 specifies that one ought to describe the item in hand, but LCRIs differ  Original microform publication  LC practice is to describe the item according to the rules laid out in AACR2 Chapter 11  LCRI 11.0 Microform reproductions  Describe the item using information relating to the original (not the microform in hand) for ISBD areas 1 through 6  Add the GMD [microform] to the title  Provide details of the reproduction in a 533 note
  • 4. Describing Microforms: Original v. Reproduction Controversy  Arguments for describing the format of the reproduction  Consistency: AACR2 1.5A3 says to do it this way  The user needs to be fully aware that the item is a microform (requires special equipment, may be non-circulating, etc.)  Arguments for describing the original work  The goal of such reproductions is often to make available older materials, not issue a revised edition  The user is likely more interested in the original content, as well as the original items its publication information, dates, and physical characteristics
  • 5. Describing Microforms: 007 – The Physical Description Field  The 007 field records important physical characteristics about the item ‡a Category of material ‡b Specific material designation ‡d Positive/negative aspect ‡e Dimensions ‡f Reduction ratio range/Reduction ratio ‡g Color ‡h Emulsion on film ‡i Generation ‡j Base of film
  • 6. Describing Microforms: AACR2 11.0 – 11.1, 11.4  11.0B Chief and prescribed sources  Chief source: title frame  Other prescribed sources: rest of item, container, any accompanying material  11.1G1 Items without a collective title  Describe as a unit or make separate entries (LCRI: “whichever seems better in the particular situation”)  11.4C–F Publication information  For unpublished microforms, do not record place of publication or a publisher name. Record the creation date in place of publication date.
  • 7. Describing Microforms: AACR2 11.5  The physical description of a microform should record (as appropriate):  the number of physical units  number of frames  note polarity, if negative  illustrations  B&W or color  Dimensions  Examples:  3 microfiches (ca. 120 fr. each)  1 microfilm reel ; 16 mm. : negative, ill.  5 microopaques ; 8 × 13 cm.
  • 8. Describing Microforms: AACR2 11.7  11.7B10 Physical description notes (500 General Note)  Reduction ratio: note items with a reduction ratio outside of the normal 16x-30x range  Reader or special equipment required  Film: provide details regarding the film  11.7B13. Dissertations (502 Dissertation Note)  11.7B16 Other formats owned (530 Note)  11.7B21 “With” notes for other works included in the item, if there is no collective title (501 With Note)  11.7B22 Note relating to the original (534 Note)  If the item is a reproduction and following AACR2 instructions, give the details of the original item. If following LC practice, put the reproduction details in a 533 note
  • 9. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2
  • 10. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: Manuscripts  Definition from AACR2  Writings (including musical scores, maps, etc.) made by hand, typescripts, and inscriptions on clay tablets, stone, etc.  Unique challenges for manuscripts  Individual versus collection  Nichols, M. F. (1996). Finding the forest among the trees: The potential of collection-level cataloging.  Ancient, Medieval & Renaissance material  Pass, G. (2003). Descriptive Cataloging of Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance, and Early Modern Manuscripts.
  • 11. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: Other Information  ISDB Areas  Area 3 Material, Area 6 Series, and Area 8 Standard Number are not used  GMDs are not used  Uniform titles 25.13 and the LCRI  Physical item versus the work  Choice of heading  Name of the physical manuscript 130 _0 ‡a Codex Madrid I  Repository designation: 110 2_ ‡a British Library. ‡k Manuscript.  Authority Headings
  • 12. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: Information Sources & Titles  4.0B1 Chief Source of Information 1. Title page 3. Caption, heading, etc 2. Colophon 4. Content of the manuscript  Single volumes, letters, postcards, & telegrams [Letter, ca. 1898 Jan. 1] Worcester Park, Surrey [to] George Gissing, Rome  Legal Documents: include as much information as possible [Lease, 1937 Oct. 17, of shop in Bridge St., Harrow, Middlesex]  For collections of manuscripts, describe as letters, correspondence, papers, or records as appropriate.
  • 13. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: Dates & Physical Description  4.4B1 Dates Sonnet, To Genevra [GMD] / [Lord Byron]. – 1813 Dec. 17  4.4B2 Sermons or Speeches [Speech] Glasgow Labour Club [GMD] / James Maxton. – 1928 Jan. 13. Note: Delivered Feb. 8, 1928  4.5B Extent of item for ancient, medieval, or renaissance [26] leaves (2 columns, 45-47 lines)  4.5B2 Collections 123 items, 3 v (183 items)  4.5C1 Non-paper material  4.5D Dimensions [1] leaf : parchment ; 35 x 66 cm., folded to 10 x 19 cm.
  • 14. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: Notes – 4.7  4.7B1 Nature, Scope or form. Use one of the following: Holograph, Ms, Mss, Printout, Typescript  4.7B7 Donor, source, previous owner Previously owned by C. Wright, 1970-1991  4.7B10 Physical Description Ms. torn in half and rejoined  4.7B11 Accompanying material In envelope, with enclosure (4 p. on 2 leaves, holograph, signed)  4.7B14 Access and Literary Rights  4.7B18 Contents  4.7B23 Ancient, Medieval & Renaissance
  • 15. Describing Manuscripts with AACR2: MARC  Field 245 subfield k  Field 260 subfield c  Field 351 Organization & Arrangement  Notes in 5XXs  506 Restrictions on access  520 Summary  524 Preferred citation form  540 Terms governing use and reproduction  541 Immediate source of acquisition  544 Location of other archival material  545 Bibliographical/historical data  555 Finding aids  561 Ownership
  • 16. Describing Archival Materials with DACS
  • 17. Describing Archival Materials with DACS: DACS: An Introduction  Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)  Offers specialized descriptive rules designed for archival collections  Replaces the previous archival content standard Archives, Personal Papers, and Manuscripts (APPM)  Some catalogers prefer using AACR2 Chapter 4 for individual manuscripts, DACS being better suited for collection-level description  As a content standard, DACS (like AACR2) is independent of the encoding protocol used. Finding aids based on DACS are typically encoded using Encoded Archival Description (EAD) or MARC.
  • 18. Describing Archival Materials with DACS: Part I – Describing Archival Materials (1)  Statement of Principles  The Nature of Archival Holdings (1 & 2)  The Relationship between Arrangement & Description (3 &4)  The Nature of Archival Description (5–7)  Creators of Archival Material (8)  Designed for single- or multi-level description  DACS identifies and elaborates upon 25 elements that can be used to describe archival collections and materials
  • 19. Describing Archival Materials with DACS: Part I – Describing Archival Materials (2)  Identity Elements (Chapter 2)  2.5 Extent  2.7 Administrative/Biographical History  Content and Structure Elements (Chapter 3)  3.1 Scope and Content  3.2 System of Arrangement  Conditions of Access and Use Elements (Chapter 4)  4.1 Conditions Governing Access  4.2 Physical Access  4.3 Technical Access  4.4 Conditions Governing Reproduction and Use  4.5 Languages and Scripts of the Material  4.5 Finding Aids
  • 20. Describing Archival Materials with DACS: Part I – Describing Archival Materials (3)  Acquisition and Appraisal Elements (Chapter 5)  5.1 Custodial History  5.2 Immediate Source of Acquisition  5.3 Appraisal, Destruction, and Scheduling Info.  5.4 Accruals  Related Materials Elements (Chapter 6)  6.1 Existence and Location of Originals  6.2 Existence and Location of Copies  6.3 Related Archival materials  6.4 Publication Note  Note Elements (Chapter 7)  Description Control Elements (Chapter 8)
  • 21. Describing Manuscripts with DACS: Part II – Describing Creators  Identifying Creators (Chapter 9)  Creators of a whole collection  Creators of elements within a collection  Administrative/Biographical History (Chap. 10)  May be maintained as part of an authority file or be recorded in the description itself  Vary greatly in level of detail  Authority Records (Chapter 11)
  • 22. Describing Archival Materials with DACS: Part III – Forms of Names  Form of Name for Persons And Families (Chap. 12)  Generally follows AACR2 for personal names  Provides rules for authorized form of family names  Examples: Giroux family Molina y Vedia de Bastianini family  Form of Geographic Names (Chapter 13)  No significant differences from AACR2  Form of Corporate Names (Chapter 14)  Generally follows AACR2 for corporate names, with a few minor areas of expanded treatment
  • 23. Describing Microforms & Manuscripts: Bibliography (1) Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules. (2005). 2nd ed., 2002 revision with 2005 update. Chicago: American Library Association. Bourke, T. A. (1994). The putative dilemma of too many analytical bibliographic records for microform sets in the online catalog; or, Does serendipity ever lead to scholarship? Microform Review, 23, 56-60. Copeland, A., Hamburger, S., Hamilton, J., Robinson, K. J. (2006). Cataloging and Digitizing Ephemera: One Team's Experience with Pennsylvania German Broadsides and Fraktur. Library Resources & Technical Services, 50(3), 186-98. Davis, S. E. (2003). Descriptive standards and the archival profession. Cataloging & Classification Quarterly. 35(3/4), 291-308. Duffy, P. and Weisbrod, E. J. (1993). Keeping your online catalog from degenerating into a finding aid: considerations for loading microformat records into the online catalog. Technical Services Quarterly, 11(1), 29-42.
  • 24. Describing Microforms & Manuscripts: Bibliography (2) Duffy, P. and Weisbrod, E. J. (1995). More thoughts on bibliographic access and microformat records. Microform Review. 24, 55-7. Hill, J. S. (1982). Descriptions of reproductions of previously existing works. Microform Review. 11(1), 14-21. John, N. R. (1982). Microforms. Journal of Library Administration. 3(10), 3-8. Legaz, M., Plaza, M. A., y Uranga, M. (2004). Organizacion de las microformas en la biblioteca. Informacion Cultura y Sociedad, (10), 83-99. Maguire, M. and Schiff, A. L. (2006). What's in a (family) name? DACS, LCSH, and mixed-standard catalogs. Retrieved April 11, 2007, from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/2518. Myers, F. S. (1998). Microforms cataloging: a brief overview. Mississippi Libraries, 62(3) 61-3.
  • 25. Describing Microforms & Manuscripts: Bibliography Nichols, M. F. (1996). Finding the forest among the trees: The potential of collection- level cataloging. Cataloging & Classification Quarterly, 23(1), 53-71. (2003). Cataloging serials reproductions: Annoying Okuhara, K. applications—reprint serials. The Serials Librarian, 44(3/4), 215-22. Pass, G. (2003). Descriptive Cataloging of Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance, and Early Modern Manuscripts. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries. Shepherd, K. (2005). [Review of the book Describing archives: a content standard]. American Archivist 68(2), Retrieved April 11, 2007, from http://www.archivists.org/periodicals/aa_v68/review-shephard-aa68_2.asp. Society of American Archivists. (2004). Describing archives: a content standard. Chicago: Society of American Archivists. Taylor, A. G. (2006). Introduction to Cataloging and Classification. 10th Ed. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

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