Multimedia software hardware
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Multimedia software hardware

on

  • 1,167 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,167
Views on SlideShare
1,167
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Multimedia software hardware Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Unit - 1Multimedia Hardware Mac vs. PC
  • 2. Overview  Macintosh versus Windows platform.  Networking Macintosh and Windows computers.  Connections.  Memory.  Storage devices.  Input and output devices.  Communication devices.1/9/2013
  • 3. Which Platform Mac or PC?  Select platform based on  Personal preference  Budget constraints  Project delivery requirements  Type and content of project materials  Availability to target audience1/9/2013
  • 4. Mac versus Windows The Macintosh platform:  Was launched by Apple in 1984.  Has a good built-in audio and high- quality graphics capability.  Includes hardware and software for digitizing and editing video and producing DVD discs.  Makes multimedia project development easier and smoother.1/9/2013
  • 5. Mac versus Windows The Windows platform:  Is a collection of different vendor-neutral components that are tied together by the requirements of the Windows operating system.  Initially focused on business computing and was not suitable for multimedia. However, it is now easier to find multimedia hardware and software for Windows as compared to the Macintosh.1/9/2013
  • 6. MAC vs. PC  Macintosh PC  Since 1984 has  Intended for business been multimedia  System beeps and  Good built-in audio tiny, tinny speaker  Easy to learn GUI  DOS screen- command driven  Since late 1980’s provides multimedia capabilities1/9/2013
  • 7. Macintosh Platform  All Macs can play sound  Latest include hardware for digitizing sound  8/16/24 bit graphics available  Can digitize both sound and video  Requires a mouse1/9/2013
  • 8. Macintosh Platform  Power Mac  1994 (RISC) – reduced instruction set computing ( IBM/Motorola)  1997 G3 series – clock speeds > 233MHz  Higher performance than existing Pentium based windows machines  2003 G4 series – clock speeds > GHz  Dual processor  Performance 20 times better than G31/9/2013
  • 9. Windows Multimedia PCs  MPC Standard- manufacturers guarantee that software written to the MPC standard (labeled MPC compliant) will play on their machines.  Three levels of minimum requirements: MPC1, MPC2, MPC31/9/2013
  • 10. Windows Multimedia PCs  1990- Level 1 ( MPC1)  16 MHz, 386SX, 2MB RAM, 30 MB drive  CD-ROM, VGA video ( 16 colors)  8 bit audio board, speakers/headphones  MS Windows with Multimedia Extensions package  Not powerful enough to develop Multimedia  Hardly powerful enough to play it1/9/2013
  • 11. Windows Multimedia PCs  1993- Level 2 ( MPC2)  25 MHz, 486SX, 4MB RAM, 160 MB drive  2xCD-ROM, VGA/SVGA video  16 bit audio board, speakers/headphones, microphone1/9/2013
  • 12. Windows Multimedia PCs  1995- Level 3 (MPC3)  75 MHz, Pentium, 8 MB RAM, 540 MB drive  4xCD- ROM, MPG support  MPEG1 video playback  Full motion video ( in small window) with TV quality  CD quality sound1/9/2013
  • 13. Networking  LANs- local area networks  WANs- wide area  Located within short networks distances ( such as a  Used for long campus, or building) distances  Allow sharing of resources  More expensive to such as printers install and maintain  Ethernet for cross-  ISPs like AOL, MSN platform development make it available and affordable1/9/2013
  • 14. Networking Mac and Windows  Networking is essential for direct communication and sharing of resources across platforms.  Local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet connections provide connectivity and networking capabilities.1/9/2013
  • 15. Networking  In a LAN, workstations are located within a short distance. They are relatively less expensive.  In a WAN, communication systems span great distances and are typically set up and managed by large corporations. They are expensive to install and maintain.  A dial-up connection to the Internet through an Internet Service Provider (ISP) also enables communication.1/9/2013
  • 16. Networking  To establish communication between a Macintosh and Windows PC, install Ethernet system and client-server software.  Ethernet is a method of wiring up computers.  Client/server software is required for communication and transfer of files.  Macintosh computers have built-in Ethernet networking, while Windows PCs require an additional Ethernet card.1/9/2013
  • 17. Networking Client/server software enables computers to communicate through an ISP  MACs  PCs  Have ethernet built  Need ethernet cards in  Usually run TCP/IP  Usually run Appletalk  Need MACLAN to  Need DAVE to communicate with communicate with MAC PC1/9/2013
  • 18. Connections  SCSI ( “scuzzy”) – Small Computer System Interface – lets you add peripherals ( up to 8)  ID 0 – internal hard disk  Id 7 – computer  Ultra SCSI – 32 devices  In built in MAC – Mac can read PC formatted devices  Can be installed in PC – PC can not read Mac formatted devices  SCSI I data transfer rate – 5 MB per sec  SCSI 2 – Fast SCSI – 10 MB per sec , Wide SCSI – 16 bit width – Fast/Wide SCSI – 20 MB per se1/9/2013  SCSI 3 – 32 devices – 40 MB per sec
  • 19. Connections  IDE-Integrated Drive Electronics- connect internal devices  PC support 2 IDE – Each IDE supports two devices  Circuit less expensive  Only 9GB drive capacity , Only one drive to be active , Requires main processor time , Failure in one results in disabling both.  Plain IDE data transfer rate– 2.5 MB per se  EIDE (Enhanced) – 16.6 MB per se  Ultra IDE – 33 MB per se  USB- universal serial bus- “plug and play”  Firewire (IEEE 1394)- supports high bandwidth serial data transfer among multiple computers1/9/2013
  • 20. Connections  Media Control Interface (MCI)  Unified command driven method for software to communicate with the peripheral devices  In windows any hardware device can be connected with MCI  Drivers from the manufacturer  Device type – animation, videodisc, vcr, scanner etc  Scripting languages – VB, Icon Author etc  Simple commands – open , close, pause, record, resume etc  System.ini file (multimedia devices and drivers)1/9/2013
  • 21. Memory  Sufficient memory must be allocated for storing and archiving files.  Memory requirements of a multimedia project depend on the projects content and scope.  The two types of memory are random access memory (RAM) and read only memory (ROM).1/9/2013
  • 22. Memory and Storage Devices  RAM - How much – Based on software – Photoshop 16 MB min , 20 MB recommended  ROM – EPROM – OROM (128 MB) – BIOS  Floppy and Hard Disks  Zip, Jaz and Syquest  Zip – 100MB  Jaz – 1 GB  Optical Storage CD, CD-R, etc.)  DVD (Digital Versatile Disk) upto 1GB  DVD-video  DVD-ROM1/9/2013
  • 23. Input Devices  Keyboards  Mice and Trackballs  Touchscreens  Magnetic Card Encoders and Readers  Graphic Tablets  Scanners  Optical Code Recognition (OCR)Devices  Infrared remotes  Voice Recognition Systems  Digital Cameras  Lightpens1/9/2013
  • 24. Output Hardware  Audio Devices  Amplifiers and Speakers  Monitors  Video Devices  Projectors  CRT – cathode ray tube  LCD – liquid crystal display  Printers  Injet  laser1/9/2013
  • 25. Communication Devices  Modems ( Hayes Compatible) v.90  ISDN – Integrated Services Digital Network  DSL-Digital Subscriber Line  Cable Modems1/9/2013
  • 26. Modems  Modems modulate and de-modulate analog signals.  They provide connectivity through standard phone lines.  Modems can be internal or external.  Modem speed is measured in baud, and the standard modem speed should be at least 56 Kbps.1/9/2013
  • 27. ISDN  ISDN stands for Integrated Services Digital Network.  It is used for higher transmission speeds by telephone.  They transfer data at the rate of 128 Kbps.  ISDN lines are used for networking, Internet access, and audio-video conferencing.  They are more expensive than the conventional analog lines.1/9/2013
  • 28. Cable Modems  They provide Internet access at speeds 100 to 1,000 times faster than a telephone modem, over the same cable network that supplies the television signal.  However, due to noise in the system, sending rates may be much slower than receiving rates.1/9/2013
  • 29. Summary  Macintosh and Windows are the two most common hardware platforms used in multimedia.  LANs, WANs, Ethernet, and client-server software facilitate communication and connectivity among computers.  Storage devices include floppy disks, hard disks, Zip drives, Jaz drives, MO drives, DVDs, and CD-ROMs.1/9/2013
  • 30. Summary  Input devices include keyboards, mice, trackballs, touchscreens, graphic tablets, scanners, OCR devices, infrared remotes, voice recognition software, and digital cameras.  Output devices include audio devices, speakers, amplifiers, monitors, video devices, projectors, and printers.  Communication devices include modems, ISDN lines, and cable modems.1/9/2013