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F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
F2L Fundamentals to Lead
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F2L Fundamentals to Lead

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Start up guide to understand leadership, its a collage of all learning available in engines

Start up guide to understand leadership, its a collage of all learning available in engines

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  • Three key components to this definition:
    - an interpersonal process between one person and a group
    - can’t have ‘leaders’ without ‘followers’
    - criterion for effective leadership = goal achievement
    Factors of leadership
    There are four major factors in leadership:
    FollowerDifferent people require different styles of leadership. For example, a new hire requires more supervision than an experienced employee. A person who lacks motivation requires a different approach than one with a high degree of motivation. You must know your people! The fundamental starting point is having a good understanding of human nature, such as needs, emotions, and motivation. You must become to know your employees' be, know, and do attributes.
    LeaderYou must have a honest understanding of who you are, what you know, and what you can do. Also, note that it is the followers, not the leader who determines if a leader is successful. If they do not trust or lack confidence in their leader, then they will be uninspired. To be successful you have to convince your followers, not yourself or your superiors, that you are worthy of being followed.
    CommunicationYou lead through two-way communication. Much of it is nonverbal. For instance, when you "set the example," that communicates to your people that you would not ask them to perform anything that you would not be willing to do. What and how you communicate either builds or harms the relationship between you and your employees.
    SituationAll are different. What you do in one situation will not always work in another. You must use your judgment to decide the best course of action and the leadership style needed for each situation. For example, you may need to confront an employee for inappropriate behavior, but if the confrontation is too late or too early, too harsh or too weak, then the results may prove ineffective.
    Various forces will affect these factors. Examples of forces are your relationship with your seniors, the skill of your people, the informal leaders within your organization, and how your company is organized.
    Attributes
    If you are a leader who can be trusted, then those around you will grow to respect you. To be such a leader, there is a Leadership Framework to guide you:
    BE KNOW DO
    BE a professional. Examples: Be loyal to the organization, perform selfless service, take personal responsibility.
    BE a professional who possess good character traits. Examples: Honesty, competence, candor, commitment, integrity, courage, straightforwardness, imagination.
    KNOW the four factors of leadership - follower, leader, communication, situation.
    KNOW yourself. Examples: strengths and weakness of your character, knowledge, and skills.
    KNOW human nature. Examples: Human needs, emotions, and how people respond to stress.
    KNOW your job. Examples: be proficient and be able to train others in their tasks.
    KNOW your organization. Examples: where to go for help, its climate and culture, who the unofficial leaders are.
    DO provide direction. Examples: goal setting, problem solving, decision making, planning.
    DO implement. Examples: communicating, coordinating, supervising, evaluating.
    DO motivate. Examples: develop moral and esprit in the organization, train, coach, counsel.
  • Trait theory
    Assumptions
    People are born with inherited traits.
    Some traits are particularly suited to leadership.
    People who make good leaders have the right (or sufficient) combination of traits.
    Description
    Early research on leadership was based on the psychological focus of the day, which was of people having inherited characteristics or traits. Attention was thus put on discovering these traits, often by studying successful leaders, but with the underlying assumption that if other people could also be found with these traits, then they, too, could also become great leaders.
  • Ohio State
    Research
    A famous series of studies on leadership were done in Ohio State University, starting in the 1950s. They found two critical characteristics either of which could be high or low and were independent of one another.
    The research was base on questionnaires to leaders and subordinates. These are known as the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LDBQ) and the Supervisor Behavior Description Questionnaire (SDBQ). By 1962, the LDBQ was on version XII.
    Actions
    Consideration: Consideration is the degree to which a leader acts in a friendly and supportive manner towards his or her subordinates.
    Initiating Structure: This is the degree to which a leader defines and structures his or her role and the roles of the subordinates towards achieving the goals of the group.
    Michigan Studies
    Research
    A famous series of studies on leadership were done in Michigan University, starting in the 1950s. They found three critical characteristics of effective leaders.
    Actions
    Task-oriented behavior:Effective managers studied did not do the same kind work as their subordinates. Their tasks were different, and included planning and scheduling work, coordinating activities and providing necessary resources.They also spent time guiding subordinates in setting task goals that were both challenging and achievable.
    Relationship-oriented behavior
    Effective managers not only concentrated on the task, but also on their relationship with their subordinates. They were more considerate, helpful and supportive of subordinates, including helping them with their career and personal problems. They recognized effort with intrinsic as well as extrinsic reward, thanking people for effort.Overall, the effective preferred a general and hands-off form of supervision rather than close control. They set goals and provided guidelines, but then gave their subordinates plenty of leeway as to how the goals would be achieved.
    Participative leadership: Effective leaders use a participative style, managing at the group level as well as individually, for example using team meetings to share ideas and involve the team in group decisions and problem-solving. By their actions, such leaders model good team-oriented behavior.
    The role of the manager is more facilitative than directive, guiding the conversation and helping to resolve differences. The manager, however, is responsible for results and is not absolved of responsibility. As such, they may make final decisions that take recommendations from the team into account.
    The effect of participative leadership is to build a cohesive team which works together rather than a set of individuals.
  • The Managerial Grid
    Description
    Leaders may be concerned for their people and they also must also have some concern for the work to be done. The question is, how much attention to they pay to one or the other? This is a model defined by Blake and Mouton in the early 1960s.
    Impoverished management
    Minimum effort to get the work done. A basically lazy approach that avoids as much work as possible.
    Authority-compliance
    Strong focus on task, but with little concern for people. Focus on efficiency, including the elimination of people wherever possible.
    Country Club management
    Care and concern for the people, with a comfortable and friendly environment and collegial style. But a low focus on task may give questionable results.
    Middle of the road management
    A weak balance of focus on both people and the work. Doing enough to get things done, but not pushing the boundaries of what may be possible.
    Team management
    Firing on all cylinders: people are committed to task and leader is committed to people (as well as task).
  • Level 5 -- Executive
    Builds enduring greatness through a paradoxical blend of humility and professional will
    Level 4 -- Effective Leader
    Catalyzes commitment to and vigorous pursuit of a clear and compelling vision, stimulating higher performance standards
    Level 3 -- Competent Manager
    Organizes people and resources toward the effective and efficient pursuit of predetermined objectives.
    Level 2 -- Contributing Team Member
    Contributes individual capabilities to the achievement of group objectives and works effectively with others in a group setting.
    Level 1 -- Highly capable individual
    Makes productive contributions through talent knowledge, skills and good work habits.
  • What is a Visionary Leader?
    Someone who can create and articulate a realistic, credible, and attractive vision of the future that improves on the present situation
    What is a Charismatic Leader?
    An enthusiastic, self-confident leader whose strong personality and actions influence people to behave in certain ways. Often visionary. Will often take risks to achieve vision, and exhibit behavior that is out of the ordinary.
    What is a Transformational Leader?
    Inspires others to transcend their own self-interests and work for the larger good of the organization.
    Articulates a vision that convinces subordinates to make major changes.
    Possesses charisma.
    Can have a profound belief on followers’ beliefs and values – actually change you (goes beyond charisma)
  • AUTOCRATIC (DICTATORSHIP) : LEADER HAS COMPLETE AUTHORITY AND CONTROLThe Autocrat
    The autocratic leader dominates team-members, using unilateralist to achieve a singular objective. This approach to leadership generally results in passive resistance from team-members and requires continual pressure and direction from the leader in order to get things done. Generally, an authoritarian approach is not a good way to get the best performance from a team.
    There are, however, some instances where an autocratic style of leadership may not be inappropriate. Some situations may call for urgent action, and in these cases an autocratic style of leadership may be best. In addition, most people are familiar with autocratic leadership and therefore have less trouble adopting that style. Furthermore, in some situations, sub-ordinates may actually prefer an autocratic style. very self-oriented; organised activities, gave orders, were aloof, and focused exclusively on the task at hand.
    leader is one who demands immediate compliance to his dictates. His style is 'Do What I Tell You'. He creates a reign of terror, bullying and demeaning his executives, roaring his displeasure at the slightest missteps in achieving the business goals. This style is the least effective, because of top-down decision making; it snuffs the ideas and the creativity from the bottom rung of employees. And, high-performing employees who are motivated by more than money, this style erodes their performance. But it has its use. It can break failed business habits, shock people into new ways of working. And in turning around a company or when a hostile takeover is looming.
    DEMOCRATIC: ENTIRE GROUP SHARES IN DECISION MAKING. The Democrat. group focused; got group members involved in making suggestions, discussing plans; leader behaved as ordinary club member. The democratic leader makes decisions by consulting his team, whilst still maintaining control of the group. The democratic leader allows his team to decide how the task will be tackled and who will perform which task.
    The democratic leader can be seen in two lights:
    A good democratic leader encourages participation and delegates wisely, but never loses sight of the fact that he bears the crucial responsibility of leadership. He values group discussion and input from his team and can be seen as drawing from a pool of his team members' strong points in order to obtain the best performance from his team. He motivates his team by empowering them to direct themselves, and guides them with a loose reign.
    However, the democrat can also be seen as being so unsure of himself and his relationship with his sub-ordinates that everything is a matter for group discussion and decision. Clearly, this type of "leader" is not really leading at all.
    LAISSEZ-FAIRE: LEADER EXERTS LITTLE INFLUENCE OR CONTROL. The Laissez-Faire Manager
    The Laissez-Faire manager exercises little control over his group, leaving them to sort out their roles and tackle their work, without participating in this process himself. In general, this approach leaves the team floundering with little direction or motivation.
    Again, there are situations where the Laissez-Faire approach can be effective. The Laissez-Faire technique is usually only appropriate when leading a team of highly motivated and skilled people, who have produced excellent work in the past. Once a leader has established that his team is confident, capable and motivated, it is often best to step back and let them get on with the task, since interfering can generate resentment and detract from their effectiveness. By handing over ownership, a leader can empower his group to achieve their goals. more concerned about having a good time than task at hand; left the group to its own devices and intervened only minimally.
    To ensure that any effects were not due to the particular confederate (i.e., the person/ personality factors), each ‘leader’ participated in each leadership style while being swapped from group to group
    While each group only experienced one leadership style, they had different leaders administer this style – controlled for personality diff.
    NO ONE APPROACH IS RIGHT FOR ALL LEADERS AND THE MOST EFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES USE ASPECTS OF ALL THREE OF THESE STYLES.
    So leadership doesn’t reside in the person – maybe it comes about as a response to the situation.
    One thing we haven’t considered yet is what it is leaders actually do in order to lead.
    Lipitt and white:
  • Give questionnaire
  • Style Choice
    If you have a group of widely differing levels of ability, confidence and commitment, you may want to lead them each with a different style.
    Directing: A team member who has a lot of enthusiasm for the job but not much actual ability, for example a new start, will need to be directed. You will not need to spend much time giving encouragement or coaxing them along. You will however have to tell them what to do next after they complete every task, and how to do the tasks set.
    Coaching /Consulting: After being in the group for a while, somebody might begin to lose confidence and therefore motivation, as they still can't seem to do the work they want to do. At this stage you will need to coach them along. You will still need to tell them what to do at virtually every point along the way, while taking care to encourage them and praise them at every turn.
    Supporting: Gradually the team member's technical ability will increase until they are at a stage where they can actually do everything required of them, however they may still lack the confidence to actually do it off their own backs. You should no longer have to tell them what to do, although they may think otherwise. You should seek their opinions on the next stage, and be seen to take notice of their ideas.
    Delegating: A technically competent person's confidence will gradually grow until they feel able to work completely on their own. You should now be able to delegate specific areas of work to them and feel little need to tell them either what to do or to praise them as frequently for doing it. The time that you don't have to spend "leading" these members of the group can be spent with the less experienced group members, or on the work that you need to do
  • “…research indicates that senior executives don’t often give self-awareness the credit it deserves when they look for potential leaders. Many execs mistake candor about feelings for wimpiness…” Ask folks if they would agree or disagree and what their criteria is?
    What Makes A Leader Effective?
    Ability to influence other people
    Has a vision – ideas or objectives that clarify to others where they should be headed
    “Sells” the vision by articulating it in a compelling and persuasive manner
    Encourages followers to establish appropriate implementation activities to support the accomplishment of the vision
    Ask audience “What do you consider an effective leader? What are key elements?”
    Show definition for a competent manager, then ask what is missing from this definition that makes it fall short of leadership?
    Emphasize the distinction between leadership and management, honing in on the development of a larger vision and the ability to move people toward it. Can be unreasonable (Landmark), goals that shoot for the stars!
  • Everyone can be a leader: Not true. Many executives do not have the self-knowledge or authenticity necessary for leadership. Individuals also must want to be leaders, and many talented people do NOT want that responsibility.
    Leaders deliver business results: Not always. If results were always a matter of good leadership, picking and identifying leaders would be easy. Businesses in quasi-monopolistic industries can often do very well with competent management rather than great leadership. Also well-led companies do not always produce short-term results.
    People who reach the top are leaders. Not necessarily. People in leadership positions are not always leaders! People may rise to top because of political acumen, fundraising skills or other traits, not necessarily true leadership qualities.
    Leaders are great coaches. Rarely. It is possible that great leaders are great coaches but that is seen only occasionally. More typically, leaders excite others through vision, not through coaching.
    What makes a leader
    Interpersonal Skills
    Communication Skills
    Humility
    Counseling/Mentoring: Leading by example
    Team Builder: controlling and evaluating group performance
    Planning and Organizing skills
    Time Management Skills
    Decision Making Skills
    Specific Business/Technical Skills
  • Pay Attention To What’s Important
    Pay attention to it in your written and oral communications. Restate the key themes over and over. Don’t undervalue repetition, repetition makes for memory and memory makes for action. Pay attention to it in your casual contacts. John Kotter, in his book to general managers, pointed out that effective general managers make great use of the random contacts they have with people. Those contacts could be in the hallway, at the water cooler, in the elevator, or walking down the street. The seize on those moments to talk about the things and ask the questions that are important to their leadership agenda. You should do that too.Organize you day, your communications, your organizational structures, your reward systems and everything else to pay attention to what’s important and then do that with unremitting diligence.
    Praise What You Want to Continue
    Praise is your best training tool. In technical terms, praise is a positive consequence that follows a positive action. It’s a reward for something done right. Use praise to get people to continue to do things or to take positive action. That’s where it’s best used.Remember, too, that praise is a tool that is most effective when it’s used inconsistently. Used consistently, praise tends to loose its force. So, don’t worry so much about praising everything that people do right, but do worry about praising.That’s important, because most of us came up in a world where we didn’t praise enough. Seek out opportunities to praise but don’t get anal retentive about it.
    Punish What You Want to Stop
    Punishment is the mirror image of praise. It’s a negative consequence that follows negative behavior. It follows a principle stated almost in biblical terms by one of my past trainees. She said: "the good shall be rewarded and the unjust shall be punished in proportion to their deeds."Punishment – negative consequences – are the tool you use to get people to stop stuff. If you figure out what’s most important for people to quit doing in your organization, rig up some kind of negative consequence for them if they do it. Be careful though, because you may fall prey to the hot stove guideline. It was Mark Twain (or if it wasn’t it should have been) who said, "A cat who sits on a hot stove will never sit on a hot stove again. But he won’t sit on a cold stove either.The management lesson here is that if you zap people too much with negative consequences, they don’t just quit doing the stuff that you don’t want them to do. They quit doing pretty much everything. That’s why "rule by fear" and "controlled ferocity" cultures have a devil of a time getting people to take initiative. They’ve been zapped so often they’re just not willing to risk it.
    Pay For the Results You Want
    Years ago when I was managing distribution and customer service centers I happened to compliment one of the customer service reps. She immediately turned around to me and said, "Don’t just tell me, show me, payday is Friday."Pay is one of the tangible ways you can reward people for doing good stuff. It’s another form of praise in visible, tangible form. Don’t limit your thinking about pay to just money, though. Pay people with time off, recognition, choice assignments, small gifts, and special bonuses to encourage the behavior you want.One of my clients used to carry around a pocket-full of restaurant gift certificates as he wandered around his trucking company. When he found somebody doing something that he wanted to encourage he was likely to whip out a gift certificate and hand it to them on the spot. It created the kind of event and drama that makes for good communication, and it encouraged positive behavior.
    Promote People Who Deliver The Results You Want
    This one just makes sense. The problem is that lots of organizations forget about it. They maintain reward and promotion systems that reward the old behavior, even while they’re trumpeting the new behavior in memo’s, meetings, and executive retreats.
    The five P’s of leadership will help you stay on track to positive organizational change. Remember to pay attention to what’s important, praise what you want to continue, punish what you want to stop, pay for the results you want, and promote the people who deliver those results and you’ll help your organization be the very best that it can become.
  • Transcript

    • 1. F2LF2L Fundamentals to LeadFundamentals to Lead
    • 2. ““The process of influencing the activities of anThe process of influencing the activities of an organized group in its efforts toward goal settingorganized group in its efforts toward goal setting and goal achievement”and goal achievement” (Stogdill, 1950, p. 3)(Stogdill, 1950, p. 3) ““Influencing, motivating, and enabling others toInfluencing, motivating, and enabling others to contribute toward the effectiveness and success ofcontribute toward the effectiveness and success of the organizations of which they are members”the organizations of which they are members” What is Leadership ?What is Leadership ?
    • 3. Which famous leaders can you think of?Which famous leaders can you think of? Before we Begin….Before we Begin….
    • 4. 1.1. Bill Gates (Microsoft)Bill Gates (Microsoft) 2.2. Jack Welch (GE)Jack Welch (GE) 3.3. Carlos Ghosn (Nissan)Carlos Ghosn (Nissan) 4.4. Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway)Warren Buffett (Berkshire Hathaway) 5.5. Michael Dell (Dell Computer)Michael Dell (Dell Computer) 6.6. Hiroshi Okuda (Toyota)Hiroshi Okuda (Toyota) (According to Price Waterhouse Coopers & Financial Times study)(According to Price Waterhouse Coopers & Financial Times study) Leaders – The world respectsLeaders – The world respects the most !the most !
    • 5. 7.7. Jeff Immelt (GE)Jeff Immelt (GE) 8.8. Carly Fiorina (HP)Carly Fiorina (HP) 9.9. Steve Jobs (Apple)Steve Jobs (Apple) 10.10. Fujio Mitarai (Canon)Fujio Mitarai (Canon) 11.11. Lou Grstner ( IBM)Lou Grstner ( IBM) Continued….Continued….
    • 6. Narayan MurthyNarayan Murthy 40%40% Dhirubhai AmbaniDhirubhai Ambani 21%21% Azim PremjiAzim Premji 6%6% Kumaramangalam BirlaKumaramangalam Birla 6%6% TatasTatas 3%3% SOURCE:SOURCE: SURVEY CONDUCTED BY LEADING B-SCHOOLS AMONG MBA STUDENTSSURVEY CONDUCTED BY LEADING B-SCHOOLS AMONG MBA STUDENTS IN THE COUNTRYIN THE COUNTRY Most Admired Indian LeadersMost Admired Indian Leaders
    • 7. TRAIT THEORYTRAIT THEORY BEHAORIVALBEHAORIVAL THOERYTHOERY MANAGERIAL GRIDMANAGERIAL GRID PATH GOAL FRAMEWORKPATH GOAL FRAMEWORK Leadership TheoriesLeadership Theories
    • 8. AmbitionAmbition and Energyand Energy AmbitionAmbition and Energyand Energy DesireDesire to Leadto Lead DesireDesire to Leadto Lead Self-Self- ConfidenceConfidence Self-Self- ConfidenceConfidence HonestyHonesty and Integrityand Integrity HonestyHonesty and Integrityand Integrity IntelligenceIntelligenceIntelligenceIntelligence ““Can-Do”Can-Do” AttitudeAttitude ““Can-Do”Can-Do” AttitudeAttitude Trait TheoryTrait Theory
    • 9. Ohio StateOhio StateOhio StateOhio State Employee-OrientationEmployee-OrientationEmployee-OrientationEmployee-Orientation Production-OrientationProduction-OrientationProduction-OrientationProduction-Orientation University ofUniversity of MichiganMichigan University ofUniversity of MichiganMichigan Initiating StructureInitiating StructureInitiating StructureInitiating Structure ConsiderationConsiderationConsiderationConsideration Behavioural TheoriesBehavioural Theories
    • 10. Country ClubCountry Club ManagementManagement TeamTeam ManagementManagement AuthoritativeAuthoritative ManagementManagement ImpoverishedImpoverished ManagementManagement Middle-of-the RoadMiddle-of-the Road ManagementManagement ConcernforPeopleConcernforPeople Concern for ProductionConcern for Production Managerial GridManagerial Grid
    • 11. Level 5 -- ExecutiveLevel 5 -- Executive Level 4 -- Effective LeaderLevel 4 -- Effective Leader Level 3 -- Competent ManagerLevel 3 -- Competent Manager Level 2 -- Contributing TeamLevel 2 -- Contributing Team MemberMember Level 1 -- Highly capableLevel 1 -- Highly capable individualindividual Leadership LevelsLeadership Levels
    • 12. VISIONARYVISIONARY CHARISMATICCHARISMATIC TRANSFORMATIONATRANSFORMATIONA LL Leadership TypesLeadership Types
    • 13.  Autocratic – “dictator”Autocratic – “dictator”  Democratic – “boss”Democratic – “boss”  Laissez Faire – “guidance”Laissez Faire – “guidance” Leadership ‘Style’Leadership ‘Style’
    • 14. Leadership Style contd….
    • 15. Directing:Directing:  Close supervision;Close supervision;  Leaders define role and task;Leaders define role and task;  Largely one way communicationLargely one way communication Supportive:Supportive:  Leader still defines roles and tasks but seeks ideas /Leader still defines roles and tasks but seeks ideas / suggestions from the followers.suggestions from the followers.  Decision still with leader.Decision still with leader.  More two-way communicationMore two-way communication Leadership StylesLeadership Styles
    • 16. Consulting:Consulting:  Day-to-day decisions rests with the followers,Day-to-day decisions rests with the followers,  LLeader facilitates and takes part in decisions,eader facilitates and takes part in decisions,  The control is with the follower.The control is with the follower. Delegating:Delegating:  Leaders are still involved in decisions and problem-Leaders are still involved in decisions and problem- solving,solving,  The control is with the follower. The control is with the follower.   The follower decides when and how the leader will beThe follower decides when and how the leader will be involved.involved. Leadership StylesLeadership Styles
    • 17. PassionPassion EmpathyEmpathy InnovationInnovation MaturityMaturity Achievement drive Achievement drive HonestyHonesty TraitsTraitsTraitsTraits Key Traits of Successful LeadersKey Traits of Successful Leaders
    • 18. Self Awareness Self Awareness InnovationInnovation CommitmentCommitment High Energy Level High Energy Level Stress Tolerance Stress Tolerance TraitsTraitsTraitsTraits Courage Key Traits of Successful LeadersKey Traits of Successful Leaders
    • 19. Integrity Drive • Truthfulness • Translates words into deeds • Inner motivation to pursue goals • Need for achievement, quest to learn Leadership Motivation • High need for socialized power to accomplish team’s or firm’s goals Emotional Intelligence • Perceiving, assimilating, understanding, and regulating emotions more Seven Leadership CompetenciesSeven Leadership Competencies
    • 20. IntelligenceIntelligence • Above average cognitive ability • Can analyse problems/opportunities Knowledge ofKnowledge of the Businessthe Business • Familiar with business environment • Aids intuitive decision making Self-ConfidenceSelf-Confidence • High self-efficacy regarding ability to lead others Seven Leadership CompetenciesSeven Leadership Competencies
    • 21.  PPay attention to what’s importantay attention to what’s important  PPraise what you want to continueraise what you want to continue  PPunish what you want to stopunish what you want to stop  PPay for the results you wantay for the results you want  PPromote those people who deliver those resultsromote those people who deliver those results The five P’s of LeadershipThe five P’s of Leadership
    • 22.  Does not listenDoes not listen  Fails to delegateFails to delegate  Does not show respectDoes not show respect  Shows no interest in followersShows no interest in followers  Gives negative feedback to a third partyGives negative feedback to a third party  Does not praise when praise is dueDoes not praise when praise is due  Criticizes in front of othersCriticizes in front of others  Takes personal credit for others ideasTakes personal credit for others ideas  Is always taking controlIs always taking control  Has a tendency to bully!Has a tendency to bully! An Effective LeaderAn Effective Leader
    • 23.  Skill 1:Skill 1: Think Like a LeaderThink Like a Leader  Identify what is happeningIdentify what is happening  Explain why it is happeningExplain why it is happening  Decide what you are going to do about it.Decide what you are going to do about it.  Skill 2:Skill 2: Use an Appropriate Leadership StyleUse an Appropriate Leadership Style  Leaders usually fit their style to the situation.Leaders usually fit their style to the situation.  Different leadership styles are appropriate to differentDifferent leadership styles are appropriate to different situations.situations. How to improve your LeadershipHow to improve your Leadership SkillsSkills
    • 24.  Skill 3:Skill 3: Pick the Right Leadership SituationPick the Right Leadership Situation  Gravitate toward leadership situations that fit yourGravitate toward leadership situations that fit your favored leadership style.favored leadership style.  Skill 4:Skill 4: Good communication skillsGood communication skills  Listen carefullyListen carefully  Ask questions and paraphrase to confirmAsk questions and paraphrase to confirm  Speak slowly and clearlySpeak slowly and clearly  Have listeners repeat the understanding of what wasHave listeners repeat the understanding of what was said.said.  Encourage questions.Encourage questions. Continue….Continue….
    • 25.  Skill 5:Skill 5: Exercise Better JudgmentExercise Better Judgment  Decisiveness and good judgment (“cognitive ability”) areDecisiveness and good judgment (“cognitive ability”) are important leadership traits.important leadership traits.  Skill 6:Skill 6: Improve Leadership Traits and SkillsImprove Leadership Traits and Skills  Exhibit self-confidence.Exhibit self-confidence.  Display honesty and integrity.Display honesty and integrity.  Increase your knowledge of the business.Increase your knowledge of the business. Continue….Continue….
    • 26. 1. Project energy.1. Project energy. 2. Be involved and involve others.2. Be involved and involve others. 3. Assist evaluation and change for the group.3. Assist evaluation and change for the group. 4. Persuade and persevere.4. Persuade and persevere. 5. Look beyond the obvious.5. Look beyond the obvious. 6. Maintain perspective.6. Maintain perspective. 7. Target energy on success opportunities.7. Target energy on success opportunities. 8. Influence cooperative action.8. Influence cooperative action. 9. Support creativity.9. Support creativity. 10. Take the initiative.10. Take the initiative. 11. Ignore the negative.11. Ignore the negative. Leadership Practical TipsLeadership Practical Tips
    • 27.  MAKE DECISIONS THAT ENHANCE THE ENTIREMAKE DECISIONS THAT ENHANCE THE ENTIRE GROUP RATHER THAN YOURSELFGROUP RATHER THAN YOURSELF  REALIZE YOU ALSO HAVE A SUPERIORREALIZE YOU ALSO HAVE A SUPERIOR  EXAMPLE OF FAIR PLAY, INTEGRITY & DEPENDABILITYEXAMPLE OF FAIR PLAY, INTEGRITY & DEPENDABILITY  KNOW THAT POWER IS GIVEN BY THE MEMBERS &KNOW THAT POWER IS GIVEN BY THE MEMBERS & CAN BE TAKEN AWAYCAN BE TAKEN AWAY Leadership EtiquetteLeadership Etiquette
    • 28.  GENUINELY LISTENS TO THE NEEDS, FEEDBACK ANDGENUINELY LISTENS TO THE NEEDS, FEEDBACK AND SUGGESTIONS OF MEMBERS, NOT JUST A SELECTSUGGESTIONS OF MEMBERS, NOT JUST A SELECT FEWFEW  UNDERSTAND THAT LEADERSHIP IS NOT A GLORYUNDERSTAND THAT LEADERSHIP IS NOT A GLORY POSITION, BUT A RESPONSIBILITY POSITIONPOSITION, BUT A RESPONSIBILITY POSITION  BE WILLING TO ROLL UP SLEEVES & HELP WHEN THEBE WILLING TO ROLL UP SLEEVES & HELP WHEN THE GOING GETS TOUGHGOING GETS TOUGH Leadership EtiquetteLeadership Etiquette
    • 29.  THE ENTIRE GROUP, NOT FOR SELF KNOWS THATTHE ENTIRE GROUP, NOT FOR SELF KNOWS THAT WITHOUT THE WORK, SUPPORT & DEDICATION OFWITHOUT THE WORK, SUPPORT & DEDICATION OF ALL MEMBERS, THE ORGANIZAITON WILL NOT BEALL MEMBERS, THE ORGANIZAITON WILL NOT BE SUCCESSFULSUCCESSFUL  SACRIFICE PERSONAL GLORY & RECOGNITION TOSACRIFICE PERSONAL GLORY & RECOGNITION TO SHARE WITH ALL FOLLOWERSSHARE WITH ALL FOLLOWERS  WORK FOR THE SUCCESS OF THE ENTIRE GROUP,WORK FOR THE SUCCESS OF THE ENTIRE GROUP, NOT FOR SELFNOT FOR SELF Leadership EtiquetteLeadership Etiquette
    • 30. Five negative leadership traits that prevent individuals from being leaders  Uninformed about the problem being discussedUninformed about the problem being discussed  Non-participativeNon-participative  Rigid in holding on to their ideasRigid in holding on to their ideas  Authoritarian in bossing others aroundAuthoritarian in bossing others around  Offensive and abusive in language styleOffensive and abusive in language style
    • 31. F2LF2L Fundamentals to LeadFundamentals to Lead

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